Alumni Weekend 2023 Reunion Volunteers

Alumni Weekend is April 28–30, 2023, and we cannot wait to celebrate with alumni in person and on campus for the first time since 2019! 

At Alumni Weekend, we’ll be celebrating two special groups of Pitzer alumni! 

Pitzer Trailblazers
Classes celebrating 50 years or more since graduation helped shape the College and blazed the trail for the Pitzer students of today. If you graduated in 1973 or earlier, you are a Pitzer Trailblazer! 

All Alumni in Classes Ending in 3s and 8s
1978 (45th Reunion), 1983 (40th Reunion), 1988 (35th Reunion), 1993 (30th Reunion), 1998 (25th Reunion), 2003 (20th Reunion), 2008 (15th Reunion), 2013 (10th Reunion), and 2018 (5th Reunion) 

Thank you for your interest in volunteering for your Reunion! There are many ways you can participate as a Class Volunteer:

  • Partner with Pitzer staff to plan class-specific and all-class programming. 
  • Recruit classmates to serve as committee members, event co-hosts, and panelists. 
  • Promote Reunion to fellow alumni through personal outreach. 
  • Encourage classmates to come back and give back during Reunion. 

If you would like to learn more about becoming a Reunion Rep, please contact our office at [email protected]

Reunion Volunteer Resources

Important Dates for Reunion Volunteers 

PAST

August 30

Reunion Volunteer Summit

September 9

Deadline to complete Confidentiality Agreement

September 27

Monthly Meeting

September 30

Deadline to determine Class Gift Designation

September (TBD)

Volunteer contact lists are assigned and solicitation outreach begins (must have completed Confidentiality Agreement)

October 18

Monthly Meeting

November 18

Deadline to submit All-Class Programming Suggestions

November 16

Monthly Meeting

December 9

Deadline to submit Reunion Class Event ideas

December 6

Monthly Meeting

January 11

Monthly Meeting

February 8

Monthly Meeting

March 9

Monthly Meeting

April 11

Monthly Meeting

April 28–30

Alumni Weekend 2023! 

Alumni Weekend 2023 Trailblazers Registration

Alumni Weekend 2023 All-Inclusive Registration

A special message from President Melvin L. Oliver and Suzanne Oliver to the Class of 2020!

[email protected]

One Pitzer. Support our efforts to respond to the most pressing needs of the Pitzer community during the COVID-19 pandemic.

PITZER ALUMNI TOWN HALL
Friday, May 1 @ 12 p.m.

Please join Pitzer College President Melvin L. Oliver for a virtual Town Hall discussion with our family community.

Click here to register.

MEDITATION: RESEARCH & PRAXIS
Monday, April 27 @ 12:15 p.m.
Sit in on our PAS Faculty-in-Residence Virtual Lunch as Professor Marcus Rodriguez leads an informal discussion about mindfulness based on his research and walk us through a brief, guided relaxation exercise. Click here to register.

RAMADAN 2020: QURAN QUEST IN THE 21ST CENTURY
Nightly, until May 23 @ 8:30 p.m. – 8:45 p.m.
Throughout the course of the month, Chaplin Adeel will be covering the entirety of the Quran, discussing how to relate and apply the message to daily life. Please visit Facebook, Instagram, or Zoom to view.

TUESDAY TAKEOVER
Live Throughout the Day
View our Instagram Live Broadcast on our alumni Instagram as one of our alumni takes over and shares what’s going on in their life

HOW TO SUPPORT A SURVIVOR
Tuesday, April 28 @ 1 p.m.
In honor of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, the emPOWER Center addresses the common signs of sexual assault, dating/domestic violence, stalking, and related stress or trauma as well as simple ways each of us can support survivors in our lives in this virtual workshop. Among topics discussed is how to support survivors during the added changes, complications, and stress of sheltering-in-place during COVID-19. Prior Registration Required. Email for more information.

SKY CAMPUS HAPPINESS
Wednesdays, until May 6th @ 5:30 p.m.
We invite you to step inwards with a 30-minute interactive guided meditation & breath work sessions for the Claremont Colleges Community by SKY Campus Happiness faculty. Click here to join Zoom meeting.

RAMADAN 2020: HALAQAH
Thursdays, until May 23 @ 5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
An intimate sessions of the Claremont Muslim community to chat and discuss a variety of different topics. Please contact Chaplain Adeel for more information or to join.

PZ FRIDAYS
Fridays
Submit a photo of your Pitzer Pride to enter in the weekly drawing to win PZ gear and gift cards! Winners will be announced every Monday with their winning photo. The drawing is open to Pitzer students, faculty, staff, alumni and parents! You may submit one photo every Friday. Click here to submit your photo.

[email protected] PRESENTS STAY AT HOME WITH PITZER ART GALLERIES
Friday, May 1 @ 11 a.m.
Pitzer College Professor of Art and co-curator of the 2017 Faculty Art Show, Bill Anthes is joined by Pitzer Art Field Group faculty Tim Berg and Jessica McCoy in the second in our “Stay at Home” series. Faculty Art Show was co-curated by Professor of Art Bill Anthes and Pitzer College Art Galleries Director and Curator Ciara Ennis. To register, please click here.

PITZER ALUMNI TOWN HALL
Friday, May 1 @ 12 p.m.
Please join Pitzer College President Melvin L. Oliver for a virtual Town Hall discussion with our family community. Click here to register.

RAMADAN 2020: JUMMAH REFLECTIONS
Fridays, until May 23 @ 1 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Join Chaplain Adeel for his weekly sermons. Each week, he will be discussing a new topic. Tune into Facebook.

Friday Events

PZ Fridays

9 a.m.
Zumba Fridays

10 a.m.
Circuit Training Fridays

12 p.m.
Boot Camp Fridays

1 p.m.
Ramadan 2020: Jummah Reflections

Starting in May
PZ Virtual Watch Party

#StayingConnected Global Resources

Created for our Pitzer alumni and family community, this digital one-stop-shop is designed with you in mind. It features curated content, resources, and virtual experiences from a variety of genres and disciplines.
Click here to view.

For a full list of upcoming events, please click here.

One Pitzer. Support our efforts to respond to the most pressing needs of the Pitzer community during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Presidential Town Hall for the Pitzer College Alumni Community

Thank you for your interest in joining Pitzer College President Melvin L. Oliver for a virtual Town Hall discussion with our alumni community on Friday, May 1, at noon (PST).

Online registration on ended. Please email [email protected] if you would like to participate.

Paul Faulstich Message

April 2020 Newsletter

Warmest Wishes from Pitzer College

Greetings, Pitzer alumni and families. Wherever you are, I hope you are doing well and staying safe.

During these difficult days, I take comfort in the strength and resilience of our community. I began my Pitzer experience as a student 45 years ago. While I didn’t imagine then that I would become a Pitzer professor and parent, I knew that I had found a rare, wonderful collection of student peers and teachers, drawn together by curiosity, creativity, and a determination to make this world a better place.

Today, I am heartened by the overwhelming acts of kindness from members of our community. Many of you contributed to the Pitzer Student Emergency Fund, and we thank you for that. Our upcoming One Pitzer campaign, launching on Monday, April 13, will highlight the College’s COVID-19 Relief Fund and provide more opportunities for us to support one another during these uncertain times.

At Pitzer, students are asked to wrestle with new ideas, stretch their minds, and apply their ideals to the lives they live. I am confident that we will not only get through this together, but that we will emerge more connected and stronger than ever.

Provida Futuri,

Paul Faulstich ’79, P’15
Professor of Environmental Analysis
Chair, Faculty Executive Committee

Alumni Association Past Presidents

We thank the following Alumni Association Presidents for their service:

1971-1975
Louise Beaudette Thornton ’68

1975-1977
Ann M. Lawson Bilodeau ’69

1977-1979
Judith Jennings Treas ’69

1979-1981
Kathey Rupp Haas ’71

1981-1983
Susan C. Price ’70

1983-1985
Kathleen Blunt Marmon ’72, P’16

1985-1988
Deborah Bach Kallick ’78

1988-1990
Sandra J. Sigman ’78

1990-1993
Camille Lombardo ’70

1993-1995
Anita Oei ’75

1995-1998
William C. Sias ’78

1998-2000
Margaret Rose Perry ’78

2000-2003
Andrew Goodman ’81

2003-2006
Ella Pennington ’81

2006-2009
Claudio R. Chavez ’88

2009-2011
Claudio R. Chavez ’88

2011-2013
Gilbert V. Gonzales ’03

2013-2015
Tracy McDonald Tindle ’82

2015-2017
Brian Christiansen ’93

2017-2019
Timothy F. Campos ’10

2019-2021
Michele Siqueiros ’95 

Pomona-Pitzer Football Golf Tournament

The Pomona-Pitzer Football Program would like to invite all alumni, faculty, staff, parents, and supporters of Pomona-Pitzer Football to join us for The 4th Annual Pomona-Pitzer Football Alumni Golf Tournament onFriday, May 1!

Sponsorship Opportunities:
$10,000: 3 4-person bundles, Sagehen Swag/Gift, Commemorative Plaque, Lunch w/ Walsh, Signed Football
General Donation Opportunity
$5,000 Tournament: 2 4-person bundles, 2 Sagehen Swag Bags/Gift, Commemorative Plaque, Gunshot Announcement
$750 Hole: Includes 4-person bundle and Sagehen Swag Bag
$125 Lunch Table: Sponsoring a lunch table of current players, a sign printed with their name to put on the table

In-Tournament Competitions–winners to receive Sagehen Football Gifts: Winner of Tournament
4-Person Winner
Longest Drive
Closest to Pin
Best Dressed

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Pomona-Pitzer Athletic Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony 2020

The Pomona-Pitzer Athletic Hall of Fame will induct five individuals on Saturday, April 11. Our 2020 Hall of Fame inductees are: Ruchi Patel ’09 for volleyball, Jose Cortez ’09 for baseball, David Obert PO’84 for swimming, Megan Prior PO’09 for volleyball, and Nancy Treser-Osgood PO’80 for Distinguished Service.

Reception starts at 5:30 p.m. followed by dinner at 6 p.m. in the Edmunds Ballroom of Pomona College’s Smith Campus Center at 170 E. Sixth Street, Claremont, CA 91711.

If you have any questions, please email [email protected] or call 909.607.4030.

Life after Graduation: A CLS Major in “The Real World”

A 5C multi-generational gathering with Chicana/o Latina/o Studies Alumni in diverse professions with opening and closing performances by La Marisoul and Dorian Wood. There will be pastries & coffee in the morning and a catered lunch in the afternoon. This event is free and open to the public.

We are so glad you will be joining us for this special celebration on Saturday, February 8, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. This event will take place at Scripps College in the Hampton Room, Malott Commons.

*An event schedule will be sent to all registered attendees approx. 2 weeks before the event

We can’t wait to see you there!

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Pitzer in San Jose: Cheers to Pitzer!

We are so glad you will be joining us at the Pitzer in San Jose: Cheers to Pitzer! event on Wednesday, January 18, 2020. We can’t wait to see you there! If you have any questions, please email [email protected].

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Pitzer in Los Angeles: A Young Alumni Toast to Pitzer!

Thank you for registering for A Young Alumni Toast to Pitzer at the Jonathan Club on Wednesday, October 23. We can’t wait to see you there! If you have any questions, please email [email protected].

This event is currently at capacity. To be placed on the waiting list, please email [email protected].

Lindsey Burkart-Lima ’16
Kyle Dalrymple ’17
April Forrest ’18
Mia Hepner ’19
Chance Kawar ’17
Alexander Landau ’18
Bailey Masullo ’15
Marley Reifert ’17
Evan Slovak ’14, Alumni Board
Event Committee

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Mark Goscenski ’05

Why Pitzer: I applied to Pitzer while studying abroad in Spain. I wanted to continue my Spanish language studies and figured Pitzer in Southern California and as a member of 5Cs would have more learning opportunities than your typical liberal arts college.

Favorite class: Community Based Spanish

Favorite professor: Peter Nardi, Sociology Professor

What keeps you busy now: In my free time, learning Greek with Duolingo.

What is your dream job: My current job. Each day I learn something new and speak in a second language.

What book is currently on your nightstand: The Code of Trust by Robin Dreeke

Best question to ask in an interview: What can I do to help this organization perform better?

What do you miss most about Pitzer: The Grove House cookies

What is your most memorable Pitzer moment: Spending an afternoon learning a West African language as part of a practicum for a class titled Teaching English as A Second Language using a method know as Total Physical Response where the instructor only communicates in that language and uses physical movements like a game of Simon Says with repetition to build vocabulary. I still remember some of the words.

Top networking tip: Networking needs to be mutually beneficial. Always ask yourself how will the person I approach benefit from this interaction? And if you call someone, the first question you need to ask after you say hello is, “Am I catching you in the middle of something? Do you have a moment to talk? I know you’re busy and I don’t want to waste your time.”

Where are do you work/what is your title: I’m the Business Development Manager at company that imports equipment and adhesives used in photovoltaics manufacturing. I identify sales opportunities for our European vendors and help American companies make cutting edge electronic products.

What is your favorite part of your job: Researching a new company that has developed some unique product / technology and then getting to call them to learn about it.

How did you get into your current line of work: My first job after college was at a futures trading firm in Los Angeles helping German speaking customers with technical support and account documents. I eventually became a commodities broker at the firm helping traders open futures and currency trading accounts and supervised our foreign language sales team. After the financial crisis in 2008/2009 I decided to look for a job where I could bridge the gap between European companies and American customers. It was important to me to work in manufacturing so I could participate in making physical products that would have a net benefit to society.

Favorite quote: “You can always count on Americans to do the right thing – after they’ve tried everything else.” – Winston Churchill

Feel free to reach out to me if you have any questions.
https://www.linkedin.com/in/mark-goscenski-bbb3631b

Submitted September 2019

Mike Harris ’91

Favorite class: Environmental Landscapes

Favorite professor: Paul Shepard and John Rodman

What keeps you busy now: Fighting for animal rights while raising a 7 year old son

What is your dream job: I have it. I direct a wildlife law program from an international animal advocacy organization.

What book is currently on your nightstand: A Small Porch by Wendell Berry and Saint Augustine: A Life, by G. Willis

Best question to ask in an interview: I always like when an applicant asks questions about how the job impacts the mission of our organization. It shows me a dedication to our organization and advocacy, not just an interest in a job with us.

What do you miss most about Pitzer: Just having the time to read and learn. It is a gift that we have in College and so hard to maintain in every day life with work and family.

What is your most memorable Pitzer moment: Tamarisk bashes with John Rodman.

Top networking tip: Get offline—make calls and have coffee dates!

Where are do you work/what is your title: Director, Wildlife Law Program, Friends of Animals

What is your favorite part of your job: Protecting animals, of course!

How did you get into your current line of work: After Pitzer and law school, I worked for a number of non-profits as legal counsel. In 2013, I approached Friends of Animals about developing an in-house legal program. They said yes without hesitation. Six years later the Wildlife Law Program is recognized a leading animal legal advocacy group.

Favorite quote: It is never too late to be what you might have been. -George Eliot

Last thoughts: Just that I know in my heart that without Pitzer I would never have become what I am today. Pitzer instilled in me the believer needed to do this type of work.

[email protected]

Submitted August 2019

Pitzer on the Pitch with Nigel Boyle and the LA Galaxy

Thank you for your interest in our event. We have reached capacity. If you have any questions, please email [email protected]

Nigel Boyle, professor of political studies, fútbol fan
Zelinda Welch ’00
Jill McGougan ’00
Jeff Gottlieb ’75
Planning Committee

Liz Scherffius ’13

Favorite class: Peoples and Cultures of the Amazon

Favorite professor: Leda Martins, associate professor of anthropology

What keeps you busy now: Planning a historical recreations shoot in Europe and keeping my plants alive!

What is your dream job: Film director

What book is currently on your nightstand: The Conference of the Birds by Farid ud-Din Attar.

Best question to ask in an interview: What is your day-to-day like?

What do you miss most about Pitzer: The people and the beautiful desert landscaping!

What is your most memorable Pitzer moment: Creating the OA kayaking trip to Catalina Island and leading the maiden voyage with my friends. Thankfully, everyone came back in one piece!

Top networking tip: Approach it as an opportunity to learn about somebody else’s line of work and how they arrived where they are. They took the time to speak with you, so get to know them a little!

Where do you work/what is your title: I’m an associate producer at Ark Media, which is a documentary production company in Brooklyn, NY, that makes films and series for PBS and Netflix. I’m currently producing a documentary about food adulteration, human trials, and the founding of the FDA. I direct my own independent documentaries on the side. My most recent film is about a woman seeking sanctuary in a rural Colorado church and her fight for permanent residency, which premiered at the 2019 Mountainfilm festival in Telluride, CO. 

What is your favorite part of your job: I’m a very curious person, so I really like interviewing people and getting a glimpse into their lives and experiences. Working to craft stories into visually compelling, and accurate, content is a creative aspect of the job that’s exciting to me. I love being a filmmaker because you have the opportunity to present diverse points of view that have the power to deepen understanding on some of the most important issues of our time.

How did you get into your current line of work: I was a staff writer on The Peel my senior year at Pitzer, and I worked as a foreign correspondent in South America my first few years after college. I pursued my master’s degree at the Columbia School of Journalism, where I ultimately made the switch from producing news to documentary film. 

Favorite quote: “No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted.” Aesop

[email protected]

Submitted May 2019

Pitzer in Seattle: Cheers to Pitzer!

Alumni, parents, students, emeriti faculty, faculty, and staff are invited to raise a glass to Pitzer. This family- and dog-friendly event, held at Optimism Brewing Company, is a great opportunity to meet other Pitzer community members in your area.

Melissa Banales ’18
Brian Bomhoff ’10
Jake Douglass ’12
Corinne Monaco ’14
Scott Nakamoto ’14
Small Dog Nakamoto
Planning Committee

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Cindy Lou Onyekwelu ’18

Favorite class: Social Inequality taught by Kara Placek

Favorite professors: Emma Stephens and Michael Ballagh

What keeps you busy now: Building upon my startup ideas within Austin, Texas, while programing on GM’s IT Supply Chain team.

What is your dream job: Engineering Product Manager | CEO of my own company

What book is currently on your nightstand: Grit by Angela Duckworth

Best question to ask in an interview: Describe your average workday

What do you miss most about Pitzer: The food, staff members and chilling on the Mounds!

What is your most memorable Pitzer moment: Pitzer study aboard exchange program with Singapore Management University

Top networking tip: Always look for conferences that relate to your interests to go to and ask as many questions as possible! 

How did you get into your current line of work: I explored multiple majors and traveled to many tech conferences to figure out what really captured my interests.

Favorite quote: “Only compare yourself to yourself.”

www.cindyonyekwelu.com, https://www.linkedin.com/in/conyekwelu/

Submitted May 2018

Carlos G. Perrett ’18

Favorite class: Latin American Politics

Favorite professor: William Barndt

What keeps you busy now: Leisure travel and work.

What is your dream job: Become a business owner in Latin America

What books are currently on your nightstand: El engaño populista (Spanish Edition) by Axel Kaiser and Gloria Álvarez and The Death and Life of the Great American School System: How Testing and Choice Undermine Education by Diane Ravitch.

Best question to ask in an interview: How many days off do I get?

What do you miss most about Pitzer: I miss the Pitzer community and being in a space of like-mind social agents of change.

What is your most memorable Pitzer moment: Finessing. I networked my way into my current line of work. I met people during my time in Costa Rica and stayed in touch with them, which helped me get a job.

Top networking tip: Stay in touch with your network. After meeting with someone, follow up. After creating a relationship, stay in touch. It’s not about who you know, it’s about who knows you.

How did you get into your current line of work: Finessing. I networked my way into my current line of work. I met people during my time in Costa Rica and stayed in touch with helped me get a job. As I get ready to go back to Houston, TX, I also reached out to networks to secure my new job.

Favorite quote: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” — Margaret Mead

[email protected]

Submitted July 2018

Gabriel Madrid ’17

Favorite class: My favorite class was Introduction to Sociology. I learned to apply sociological concepts to everyday life to better understand how society affects individual behavior. My positive experience influenced me to declare sociology as a major.

Favorite professor: Pitzer has great professors, however, some professors are more special than others because they go the extra mile. I’m happy to say that Dr. Alicia Bonaparte is a part of this special group. She is a great professor, role model, and friend. I am grateful for her mentorship. She helped me survive college.

What keeps you busy now: I am an admission counselor at Chapman University. We are currently finalizing travel arrangements and working on special projects to promote diversity on campus. With travel season nearby, we are super busy in the office.

Top networking tip: It never hurts to ask for help. People love talking about their profession. You should always seek advice from people who are experts in their field.

How did you get into your current line of work: Throughout college, I worked for the Office of Admission as a tour guide and admission fellow. After graduation, I noticed an opening at Chapman and immediately applied. I was hired within a few weeks and fell in love with the job. It is always a privilege when you get to help students navigate the college selection process.

Favorite quote: “Hard work beats talent when talent doesn’t work hard.” Tim Notke

Submitted July 2017

Sylvie Froncek ’11

Favorite class: The Sixties Now taught by Tom Hayden

Favorite professor: Phil Zuckerman

What keeps you busy now: For the last year I’ve been traveling around the world, working as an electric-bike tour guide in New Zealand, studying human sexuality in the Netherlands, and cycle-touring in Chile. A few months ago I returned to the US and started my own business, which has definitely kept me occupied.

What is your dream job: Running skills- and confidence-building courses for women and gender minorities, which is what I’m doing now!

What book is currently on your nightstand: The Origami Man: A Farther Orbit by Benjamin Mumford-Zisk

What do you miss most about Pitzer: I miss having all my favorite people right down the hall from me.

What is your most memorable Pitzer moment: The chili pepper game was one of my highlights of Pitzer. It was this hide-and-go-seek competition where someone would hide a plastic pepper on the 5Cs. Then they would take an obscure, up close photograph of it and post it on the student list-serv with a poem that described its location. As soon as someone new found the pepper, they’d put it to a new hiding place and continue the thread. It felt like this creative and cooperative activity shared by anyone who was interested, which ended up being a lot of people that I’d never even met. I think the game went on for about three months. 

Top networking tip: There’s this strange temptation to say the things that people want to hear when you’re trying to connect with them. You end up pitching a modified version of yourself and eventually the realities of what you want and who you are will come out anyway. Talking to people face to face and being your most authentic self from the start has always worked well for me.

How did you get into your current line of work: I started working at a ropes course at Cornell University almost by accident when I was 15 years old. While at Pitzer I led Orientation Adventures, Pitzer Outdoor Adventure trips, and spent hours at the Green Bike Program, all of which solidified my love for outdoor education and team-building. Those experiences and more led me to jobs as a bicycle mechanic, tour guide, and an Outward Bound instructor. The skills that I was able to hone by following my passions have brought me to this particular work as an educator, mentor, and mechanic. 

Favorite quotes: “How does it get better than this and what else is possible?” — Joanna Giles; “Be excellent to each other.” — Bill S. Preston, Esq.

[email protected]; instagram.com/viecycle

Submitted April 2018

Nick Lopez ’07

Favorite Professor at Pitzer: Jose Calderon

What keeps you busy now: I am working to connect individuals with their personal and professional goals by pursuing higher education. 

Top networking tip: One way to get the most out of networking is to step out of your comfort zone and make genuine attempts to connect with people on a personal level. The rest usually takes care of itself. Making genuine connections through honest conversation is how the best networks get built. 

How did you get into your current line of work: After working for 10 years in corporate America, I decided it was time to make a change. I pursued my passion for helping people connect with their personal and professional goals. Working at Claremont Graduate University has provided me the opportunity to do all of that and more.

Favorite quote: “If you want to change the world, start by loving your family.” –Mother Teresa

[email protected]

Submitted July 2017

Trifari Williams ’01

Favorite class: Cuban Film and Literature

Favorite professor: Ntongela Masilela and Jesse Lerner

What keeps you busy now: My three smart/beautiful daughters and working in television.  

What is your dream job: Running my own production company with my husband.

What book is currently on your nightstand: The Four Agreements.

Best question to ask in an interview: What makes up the essence of who you are?

What do you miss most about Pitzer: The professors!!!

What is your most memorable Pitzer moment: When my senior thesis film was screened and won an award.

Top networking tip: Don’t be afraid to reach out and talk to people you think are out of your league.

How did you get into your current line of work: Knowing the right people and having a good enough character to be recommended.

Favorite quote: “May my character not spoil my destiny.”

[email protected]

Submitted August 2017

Alumni Spotlight

Char Miller ’75

Char Miller

“While writing my senior thesis, I realized that I loved to research in dusty archives and that being a historian would take me to those dark, dim, and intriguing places. It helped that in Claremont I had a cadre of mentors who clearly reveled in their work in and out of class, and I wanted to share in that joy.”

Shawn Coleman ’83

“In 1977, a multi-race teenager began researching colleges in the continental US. His initial list of prospective institutions did not include Pitzer. In 1978, he achieved SAT scores that garnered attention from dozens of schools that were not on his list, including Pitzer. Additional research yielded a top-five list of schools that did include Pitzer, which was ultimately selected for three reasons…”

Len Davis ’97

“In 1999, I traveled around the US at the turn of the millennium, 20,000 miles in a minivan with my best friend, using the new technology of digital video to interview strangers about Y2K and the state of the nation. I’ve been a filmmaker ever since.”

Mike Harris ’91

“After Pitzer and law school, I worked for a number of non-profits as legal counsel. In 2013, I approached Friends of Animals about developing an in-house legal program. They said yes without hesitation. Six years later the Wildlife Law Program is recognized a leading animal legal advocacy group.”

Yvette J. Saavedra ’00

Even if you’re shy, fight it, and meet new people.”

Trifari Williams ’01

“Don’t be afraid to reach out and talk to people you think are out of your league.”

Mark Goscenski ’05

Networking needs to be mutually beneficial. Always ask yourself how will the person I approach benefit from this interaction? And if you call someone, the first question you need to ask after you say hello is, “Am I catching you in the middle of something? Do you have a moment to talk? I know you’re busy and I don’t want to waste your time.”

Nick Lopez ’07

“One way to get the most out of networking is to step out of your comfort zone and make genuine attempts to connect with people on a personal level. The rest usually takes care of itself. Making genuine connections through honest conversation is how the best networks get built.” 

Sylvie Froncek ’11

“I started working at a ropes course at Cornell University almost by accident when I was 15 years old. While at Pitzer, I led Orientation Adventures, Pitzer Outdoor Adventure trips and spent hours at the Green Bike Program, all of which solidified my love for outdoor education and team-building. Those experiences and more led me to jobs as a bicycle mechanic, tour guide, and an Outward Bound instructor. The skills that I was able to hone by following my passions have brought me to this particular work as an educator, mentor, and mechanic.” 

Liz Scherffius ’13

“I was a staff writer on The Peel my senior year at Pitzer, and I worked as a foreign correspondent in South America my first few years after college. I pursued my master’s degree at the Columbia School of Journalism, where I ultimately made the switch from producing news to documentary film.”

Gabriel Madrid ’17

“My favorite class was Introduction to Sociology. I learned to apply sociological concepts to everyday life to better understand how society affects individual behavior. My positive experience influenced me to declare sociology as a major.”

Carlos G. Perrett ’18

“My most memorable Pitzer moment is traveling to Ecuador with the IGLAS cohort my first year. We played an awesome soccer game with locals and Pitzer faculty. ”

Cindy Lou Onyekwelu ’18

“Always look for conferences that relate to your interests to go to and ask as many questions as possible!” 

Yvette J. Saavedra ’00

Favorite class: Chicana/o History (PO)

Favorite professor: Maria Soldatenko

What keeps you busy now: Tenure-track job and research

What is your dream job: I’m doing it.

What book is currently on your nightstand: Octavia Butler’s Dawn and Kindred

What do you miss most about Pitzer: The people and campus.  

What is your most memorable Pitzer moment: Atttending my first protest on campus.

Top networking tip: Even if you’re shy, fight it, and meet new people.

How did you get into your current line of work: Through the inspiration of the various professors at Pitzer.

Favorite quote: “Do work that matters. Vale la pena.” — Gloria Anzaldúa

[email protected]

Submitted July 2018

Len Davis ’97

Business: Loving Legacy Video
Favorite class: The Crossroads of Art and Politics
Favorite professor: Mike Davis
What keeps you busy now: My first feature-length documentary. I’m working on about 20 years of spontaneous interviews with strangers.                 
What is your dream job: Fully financed documentary filmmaker
What book is currently on your nightstand: Inside of a Dog
Best question to ask in an interview: When have you felt most alive in life?
What do you miss most about Pitzer: That it’s likely a school I could no longer get into as the student I was when I entered
What is your most memorable Pitzer moment: Studying abroad in Nepal
Top networking tip: Have a few drinks
How did you get into your current line of work: In 1999, I traveled around the US at the turn of the millennium, 20,000 miles in a minivan with my best friend, using the new technology of digital video to interview strangers about Y2K and the state of the nation. I’ve been a filmmaker ever since.
Favorite quote: “Stay Fresh” + “Don’t ask yourself what the world needs. Ask yourself what makes you come alive, and go do that, because what the world needs is people who have come alive.”
www.youtube.com/LenDavis

Submitted August 2018

Shawn Coleman ’83

Favorite professors: Dr. Andrew Zanella; Dr. Ronald K.S. Macaulay

What keeps you busy now: On October 2, 2018, I was issued a patent for one of my ideas. This was the culmination of four years of work. I am now busy launching the product, which I named WEDJ Containers, starting in California.

What is your dream job: I am living it! For the second time since graduating from Pitzer, I have started my own business, of which I am president and CEO.

What book is currently on your nightstand: Sobering Trademark Stories, by David L. Hoffman, Esq. David’s firm, Hoffman Patent Group, handles intellectual property matters for my company.

Best question to ask in an interview: What infrastructure does this enterprise have in place to ensure a sustainable future?

What do you miss most about Pitzer: The people

What is your most memorable Pitzer moment: During my time at Pitzer, I lived the student-athlete dichotomy. Therefore, I have two most memorable moments. As an athlete, I made a catch in a 1980 football game against Azusa Pacific. I remember the ball being high and me jumping up to get it. From the sidelines, my teammates described me as “flying” up to get the ball. They said that I vertically jumped more than three feet. As I landed, I was hit hard by at least three defenders, but I held onto the ball, which was marked on the opponent’s three-yard line. We scored on the next play. Head Coach Steinhour said it was one of the greatest efforts he had seen. As a student, the moment I turned in my senior thesis I knew that I earned my degree in chemistry and the sense of accomplishment and pride I had at the time was palpable. I was the second family member of my generation to obtain a degree. My oldest brother had the same accomplishment three years before when he was awarded a degree in computer science from Washington University in St. Louis.

Top networking tip: Treat EVERYONE with respect, regardless of their occupation, race, creed, color, gender, sexual orientation, or other distinctive circumstance. My professional journey began less than one month after I graduated from Pitzer. I was speaking to some guys who also grew up in Santa Monica. They were welcoming me back and asking about what college I attended and the type of degree I received. As expected, none of them ever heard of Pitzer College and they figured that I had some kind of science or engineering degree. One of the guys said he worked in the shipping/receiving department of a business in Santa Monica and he could probably get me a job. I said that I was not sure I wanted that kind of job. He said that I misunderstood him, that the company makes some kind of test kits, and there were a lot of employees at the business who wore white lab coats. He gave me the owner’s office number and I called the next day. The company was Pantex, they manufactured radioimmunoassay kits for testing steroids and androgens, and I was hired as a quality control chemist. About three months later, in September of 1983, I began my first corporate job as an analytical chemist for the Chevron Refinery in El Segundo, CA. This event gave me the first proof of an adage that my parents often cited: “It’s easier to find a job when you already have one.”

Where do you work/what is your title: I own and operate a California subchapter S corporation, S. Coleman Enterprises, Inc. I am the president and CEO.

What is your favorite part of your job: Having an idea and manifesting it in the real world. I have been able to take one of my ideas that was originally conceptualized in the 1990s, when I owned my first business. From that idea, I was issued a patent, which validates another accomplishment, that of inventor. A manufacturing platform has been developed and I will have units to sell by March of 2019. My product, WEDJ Containers, will benefit the environment.

How did you get into your current line of work: When I was an analytical chemist for Chevron, there was a section of the lab that housed the Environmental Department. This department collected soil, water, air, and waste samples and either tested them or sent them out to commercial testing labs. Jeff was the lead chemist for the Environmental Department. One of the tasks that Jeff routinely performed was sampling the water in deep wells located throughout the refinery. Some of these wells were beneath large manhole covers that were removed using a five-foot pry bar. One day, the pry bar slipped, the manhole cover shattered Jeff’s foot, and my boss asked me to take over Jeff’s responsibilities. This was the start of my career as an Environmental, Health, and Safety (EHS) professional. Over the next 30 years, every position that I worked had a predominant EHS component.

Favorite quote: “The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.” Lao Tzu

Any last thoughts to share with fellow alumni? In 1977, a multi-race teenager began researching colleges in the continental United States. His initial list of prospective institutions did not include Pitzer. In 1978, he achieved SAT scores that garnered attention from dozens of schools that were not on his list, including Pitzer. Additional research yielded a top five list of schools that did include Pitzer, which was ultimately selected for three reasons:

1. The ability to design a curriculum – All of the other schools in the final top five had “breadth requirements” that included classes in fields that were of no interest.

2. Close contact with faculty – Students who attended USC, UCLA, and other large schools in that era had limited contact with their professors.

3. An ethnic and socio-economic makeup emulating that of Santa Monica Unified School District – Racism and other exclusionary practices were a daily hazard for minorities in the 1970s. The relative diversity of Santa Monica in those days provided some insulation as well as a sense of comfort.

The parents of the teenager raised him to believe that he could accomplish anything upon which he focused his mind. Pitzer was the perfect incubator for this philosophy.

Youth is a time rife with mistakes and 35 years is more than enough time for a comprehensive retrospective of the decisions made early in one’s life. Be it based in serendipity or genius, my decision to attend Pitzer College will always be beyond reproach.

[email protected]

Submitted October 2018

Char Miller ’75

Favorite class: Politics and the Novel

Favorite professor: Lucian Marquis

What keeps you busy now: I teach in the Environmental Analysis Program at Pomona College and am active in the EA major across the Claremont Consortium

Top networking tip: Schmooze.

How did you get into your current line of work: While writing my senior thesis, I realized that I loved to research in dusty archives and that being a historian would take me to those dark, dim, and intriguing places. It helped that in Claremont I had a cadre of mentors who clearly reveled in their work in and out of class, and I wanted to share in that joy. I’ve been so lucky to have found it.

Favorite quote: “It is not your responsibility to finish the work [of perfecting the world], but you are not free to desist from it either.” (Rabbi Tarfon: Pirke Avot 2:21)

[email protected]; @charmillerfour

Submitted July 2017

Pitzer College at the Magic Castle

Thank you for your interest in this event. We have reached our maximum capacity. Keep your eyes peeled for future communication of this event next year.

Sagehens Men’s Alumni Soccer Match

Thank you for registering for the Sagehens Men’s Alumni Soccer networking event and match.

Below is the schedule for the day:
2:30 p.m.         Pre-match Networking Session
5 p.m.              Kickoff
After Match     Post-match BBQ

An Evening with President Melvin L. Oliver and Suzanne Oliver

Common Space Brewery Tour and Tasting

Alumni, parents, students, staff, faculty, and friends! Thank you for joining us at Common Space Brewery with Ben Demarchelier ’04, Sophy Cohen ’13, and Academic Director of Intercollegiate Media Studies Elizabeth Affuso.

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2018 Whale Watching

Readings for Engagement Month

Future Zarahs by William Powers

The Revolution Will Note Be Funded by Pail Kivel

Practical Activism in Difficult Situations
Pitzer College ResLife Fall Training 2015

Dominant Groups Subordinate Groups
Always believe the other person’s experience Engaging the aggressor in a conversation through questions. This could help give you context. You can create a space for dialogue and vulnerability.
Coalition  Building – in a way that’s driven, not by what you think, but by the way that people who are impacted believe they can be best supported When the aggressor is in a position of power, recognizing that is difficult. How can you use YOUR power to make an intervention? Read the environment. Are there others that can join you? What are the consequences? Assessing what intervention is going to be most effective for allies and targets.
Being willing to ask for guidance… how can I be an ally? (and if others don’t have desire or capacity to teach you, then seek mentors who are allies) Coalition Building- you are not alone!
Honor the experience of the person coming to you and your own experience Asking for ally ship, coming to others who are not part of your marginalized identity group, reaching out to build relationships and/or a coalition.
When you feel guilty, ashamed, embarrassed… it’s so uncomfortable that you may check out because it’s too painful… be mindful and present to your own reaction Finding the delicate balance between protecting yourself and being vulnerable enough to address a microaggression with an aggressor. You can’t give up self-protection, but vulnerability is important to make those human connections. Will you be wrong sometimes? Yes. Will you be right sometimes? Yes.
Don’t allow guilt and shame to keep you from taking responsibility and being present to the experience of the other On who’s shoulders do you stand and who are you accountable to? Being accountable for the people that came before and the people who come after.
On who’s shoulder do you stand and to whom are our accountable? Not fighting every fight- it’s okay to not let a microaggression ruin your day. Choose your battles.
Reflect on the groups you are a part of that may be perpetuating oppression and whether you can call them out. Can you always call out your mom? Can you call out your friends? What does that look like? Can you call them UP instead of OUT? Engage in self-care. “Caring for myself is not self-indulgence; it is self-preservation and that is an act of political warfare” Audre Lorde.
Aim for dialogues over a fight. Ask questions.
Knowing what to step in and when not to. Ask questions.
Not fighting every fight.
Engage in self-care. “Caring for myself is not self-indulgence; it is self-preservation and that is an act of political warfare” Audre Lorde.

 

Tips for being an effective social justice ally and advocate
Research has shown that prejudice is countered when critical thinking, empathy development, and positive self-esteem are nurtured. It is important to think about how we can most effectively raise the complex issues of hate, bias, scapegoating, and exclusion so that conversations about cultural understanding and respect are not limited to commemorative events, or other special programs, holidays, or activities but instead, are a part of everyday life. Creating inclusive, respectful communities is an ongoing effort and working for social justice is a life-long endeavor. To prepare for successfully raising issues of diversity, bias, and social justice with others, attempt to make the following practices an integral art of daily practice:

  1. Self-Exploration – Examine personal cultural biases and assumptions. Explore personal perceptions and understanding of situations by developing an awareness of personal cultural “filters”. Keep abreast of current anti-bias and social justice issues. Always consider yourself a lifelong learner, a part of the continual learning process about social justice.

  2. Comprehensive Integration – Integrate culturally diverse information/perspectives into all aspects of learning. Go beyond the constraints of your own cultural history by incorporating multiple perspectives into your worldview, through immersion in other cultural literature, arts, languages, and community experiences.

  3. Accepting Environment – Establish an environment that allows for mistakes. Since most people have been unconsciously acculturated into prejudicial and stereotypical thinking, individuals may not be aware that certain attitudes are hurtful to others. Acknowledge that intolerant thinking will surface from time to time in others and ourselves. Model non-defensive responses when told that something you said or did was offensive to someone.

  4. Intervention – Be prepared to respond to purposely-directed acts of bias. Silence in the face of injustice conveys the impression that prejudicial behavior is condones or not worthy of attention. Make it clear to those around you that name-calling, slurs, offensive jokes, and outright prejudicial behavior will not be tolerated. Appropriate and timely intervention is critical in interrupting both interpersonal and institutional acts of bias.

  5. Discovery Learning – Avoid “preaching” to others about how they should behave. Research indicates that exhortation is the least effective methodology for changing prejudiced attitudes; in fact, it often produces a result opposite from the desired effect. Create opportunities for yourself and other to resolve conflicts, solve problems, work in diverse teams, and think critically about information.

  6. Life Experience – Provide opportunities for everyone to share their distinct life experiences in order to recognize differences, celebrate similarities, and develop empathy. Make every attempt to make any space you are a part of (school, work, home, place of worship, etc.) one where no one’s experiences are marginalized, trivialized, or invalidated. Prejudice and discrimination have a unique impact on each individual. We all develop a variety of coping strategies based upon the type and frequency of discrimination we have experienced. It is never fruitful to engage in a debate over who has suffered the most. Oppression is harmful to all people in all of its forms.

(Adapted from ADL “Creating an Anti-Bias Learning Environment” curriculum resources)

Pitzer Community Engagement & Alumni Action Month

June is Pitzer’s Engagement Month! 

We have teamed up with the Community Engagement Center (CEC)  to connect the Pitzer community with our local community partner sites and beyond. Engaging with social responsibility and the ethical implications of knowledge and action draws many to Pitzer and informs their experience in meaningful and lasting ways.

Here’s how to get involved:

  • Decide where you want to serve. We have several Claremont-local options listed below. Choose a community, organization, or group you want to partner with.
  • Tell us! Let [email protected] know where you plan to connect during the month of June or share in the Facebook event.
  • Read the materials. Click here to thoughtfully frame your experience.
  • Tell your friends! Rally your Pitzer community friends to serve with you
  • Serve! Post a photo on Facebook or Instagram and use #PitzerServes to let us know what you’re doing out in the world to make a Pitzer difference.
  • Share. Tell us all about your experience.

If you want to get involved, but don’t know where to start, contact the CEC. They can help!

Below are Claremont-local options for getting involved:

  1. Tongva Living History Garden , Upland, CA – The Chaffey Communities Cultural Center and Pitzer College students have teamed up to design, build, and cultivate a Living Tongva History Garden. Your help is needed to help maintain the Tongva Living Garden which seeks to represent 500 years of growth in the area.

  2. Julia Bogany: Talking Circle A project facilitated by Pitzer Students after decolonizing discussion to recognize and include indigenous ways of knowing on campus. The project is creating a defined space on the campus for collaboration among students, faculty, and indigenous community members from the greater Southern California area.

  3. Indige-Nation Claremont Scholars – Indige-Nation Claremont Scholars provides mentorship and support for Native youth who are in the process of applying to colleges. Claremont College students either drive to partner sites twice a week or groups come to Pomona. Partner schools include Sherman Indian High School, Noli Indian High School, and Semillas del Pueblo.

  4. Elders in Residence Program – Brings American Indian elders to campus for hands-on workshops, presentations and discussions, to answer questions, offer support, or just listen. Our current Elder in Residence is Julia Bogany, Tongva cultural affairs director.

  5. Native Youth to College Program – Focuses  on college preparatory experience for Native American high school students in 9th-12th grades, designed to motivate them to complete high school, strengthen their self-esteem, their academic preparation for college, and their connection to traditional knowledge and culture. Native American Scholars and Elders contribute cultural knowledge and traditional ways of learning within the academic environment. For more information, contact Scott Scoggins ’10, director,  Native Youth to College, assistant director, Native American Initiatives  [email protected].

  6. Huerta Del Valle – Ontario, CA – The Huerta Del Valle (HdV) mission is to cultivate an organization of community members to grow our own organic crops. Through growing our food we work toward sustainable community empowerment and health: creating meaningful work, building lasting skills, and developing strong relationships within the city of Ontario. Just west of Bon View Park, it’s the city’s first urban farm and community garden. Volunteers will be involved in planting, harvesting, composting, and other gardening tasks.  For more information,  contact HdV at [email protected].

  7. Help Build the Prototypes Library – Prototypes Women’s Center has been a community-based partnership with Pitzer College for nearly 20 years and was started by Pitzer professor, Dr. Laura Harris. Prototypes’ mission is to rebuild the lives of women, children, and communities impacted by substance abuse, mental illness, and domestic violence; the program promotes self-sufficiency while ensuring safety and shelter for those in need. Each year, Prototypes serves more than 10,000 women, men, and children with individualized and comprehensive behavioral health services. Women who enroll in their residential treatment program can bring their children with them. In fact, all of their programs are focused on the needs of the entire family. Therefore, services are available for children separately or even while their parents are receiving care. The impact this can have on the recovery of the client and the preservation of the family cannot be emphasized enough. Prototypes is a very special place which not only does tremendous work with communities but also hosts our students’ community-based internships regularly throughout the year in GED tutoring, College Access classes, and youth programs.


    Prototypes clients have made a direct request to Pitzer and the CEC to help build their on-site library. Gently used or new books for all ages and interests are welcome! To place a donation or learn more, please contact CEC Community Fellow, Elizabeth Shulterbrandt at [email protected].