Emerging Artist Series

  • Emerging Artist Series #14: Cathy Akers

    Pitzer College Art Galleries, February 2 – March 28, 2019

    Opening Reception:
    Saturday, February 2, 2-4 p.m.

    Cathy Akers:
    A Utopia for Some: Morningstar and Wheeler’s Ranches Reconsidered
     

    Expectant (2018), Porcelain, photocopy transfer, underglaze and glaze, 14.25″H x 13″W x 14″D

    The result of more than ten years of research, Cathy Akers’ installation A Utopia for Some: Morningstar and Wheeler’s Ranches Reconsidered explores two northern Californian experimental communes that closed in 1973. Examining the impulse for communal living outside conventional contexts, the exhibition focuses on utopian aspects of these intentional communities as well as their potential for dysfunction.

    Included in the exhibition are a number of exploded ceramic vase-like forms, which combine photographic fragments from the communes’ archives with text that has been inscribed onto the surface of the objects. Extracted from stories narrated by the women themselves, the text articulates different aspects of communal living—surviving off the land, drug experimentation, sexual violence, and utopian idealism. Marginalized as a result of their decision to live outside conventional parameters, these women’s lives have often been overlooked and forgotten. A Utopia for Some: Morningstar and Wheeler’s Ranches Reconsidered gives voice to their experiences and value to their existence.

     

    Related Event:

    Panel Discussion: Feminisms, Motherhood, and the Counterculture
    with Micol Hebron, Olga Koumoundouros, Astri Swendsrud, Claudia Parducci, and Cathy Akers

    The panel discussion will investigate the politics of gender, women’s role in society, and women as producers of counterculture that affirm female identity.

    Wednesday, March 27 at 1:30 p.m.
    Broad Performance Space, Pitzer College



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    Cassie Riger
  • Emerging Artist Series #13: Cassie Riger

    Cassie Riger: Automatic Vaudeville

    Curated by Ciara Ennis

    September 29 – December 8, 2018
    Lenzner Family Art Gallery, Atherton Hall

    Opening Reception: Saturday, September 29, 2 – 4 p.m.
    Nichols Gallery, Broad Center

    Inspired by groundbreaking scholarship of Miriam Hansen and Tom Gunning that focused on early cinema and pre-Hollywood viewing habits, Cassie Riger’s work recreates proto-cinematic devices that explore spectacle and desire.

    Unlike contemporary cinema, film in the late 19th century was encountered in the chaotic context of a funfair or arcade, accessible to all and connected to the flux of everyday. Many early motion-picture devices, such as the Praxinoscope or Zoetrope, were viewer-activated, allowing the user some control of the image. Creating her own renditions of such devices, alongside sculptural, sonic and projected elements, Riger engages scale distortion, color filters and extremes of light and dark to underline the theatrical artifice of film. As Riger has remarked, her work aims to “foster a consideration of cinema as a social medium—with an eye toward viewers rather than auteurs.”

    Riger’s immersive installations enable viewers to engage in the playful and accessible experience of early film, appreciate the medium’s sly trickery, and indulge in its magical qualities. This participatory aspect of viewing empowers the audience and sets it apart from its contemporary counterpart.

    Artist Bio: Cassie Riger
    Los Angeles artist Cassie Riger’s works use installation, kinetic sculpture, performance, and photography to investigate the history of moving images and the interplay between mass media and its audience. Her exhibition of light-based art, Prisms, won the 2018 Curator’s Lab award from Friends of Contemporary Art. She recently completed an NES Residency in Iceland and had projects at the Queer Biennial in Los Angeles and Plan B International Art Festival. She has had solo exhibitions at Northwestern University’s AIR Studio, University of California, Irvine’s Room Gallery and the Right Window Gallery in San Francisco. Riger has also published writing on photography, film and video in Camerawork: A Journal of Photographic Arts, ArtWeek, Art Ltd., and other publications.  She earned an MA from the University of Chicago and an MFA from UC Irvine.

    Related Event:

    Artist Talk with Cassie Riger
    Thursday, October 4 at 2 p.m.
    Lenzner Family Art Gallery

    This exhibition is supported in part by the California Arts Council, a state agency, and the National Arts and Disability Center at the University of California Los Angeles.

    Image:
    News (orange) (detail view) (2018); 114” x 150” x 124” (variable to site); Motor, paper, metal, plexiglass, slide projector with 80 handmade slides



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    Distance In/Formation (2016), production stills. Photo: Johanna Breiding
  • Emerging Artist Series #12: Distance In/Formation: Johanna Breiding, Rebecca Bruno, Yann Novak, and Willy Souly

    Co-curated by Robert Crouch and Ciara Ennis

    Lenzner Family Art Gallery
    January 26 – March 30, 2017

    Opening Reception: January 26, 5-7 pm

    Distance In/Formation is a collaborative work by Los Angeles-based artists Johanna Breiding, Rebecca Bruno, Yann Novak, and Willy Souly that draws on landscapes in the distance between Los Angeles and Claremont.  Featuring two media artists and two dancers, the project focuses on the intersection of dance, video, sound, and aesthetics as a means to explore the extension of body in space. Inhabiting queer identities, the project creates a space in which different architectures, geographies, and subjectivities are manifested and extend beyond the physical constraints of site and the body itself.

     



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    Blacklisted: A Planted Allegory (Incubation), 2014
  • Blacklisted: A Planted Allegory

    Emerging Artist Series #9: Jenny Yurshansky

    January 24 – March 26, 2015
    Lenzner Family Art Gallery

    Blacklisted: A Planted Allegory investigates the distinction between native versus invasive species as determined by the California Invasive Species Advisory Committee, a scientific organization charged with creating a statewide “living list” of invasive species since late 2009. The discourse surrounding a list of “invasive” or “alien” flora and fauna species has interesting and fruitful correlations to policies regarding immigration, multiculturalism and evolving ideas about national identities that are inherently tied to the identity of border cultures. The project allows viewers to engage in a meaningful and nuanced way with how these issues are thought of in direct and applicable terms.

    Jenny Yurshansky: Hot House Hot House

    Blacklisted: A Planted Allegory takes a number of forms, including a comprehensive index of the invasive species found on-site; a large-scale projection—a portrait of all the plants collected and a record of their growth during June 2014; and a light-box image of their incubated sequestration. The exhibition also features two sculptural works, one of which is an index of the more than 100 plants collected, in the style of a classic botanical herbaria rendered in detailed handmade paper silhouettes. The second sculpture refers to the Harvard Museum of Natural History’s Ware Collection of Glass Models of Plants, which is a window into the common presence in 1892 of what are now rare California native plants. This piece, which features a seemingly empty vitrine, is a nod to the fears of the ultimate disappearance of natives in the wake of the encroachment by alien species that fuels the discourse around this issue.

    Related Programming

    The Botany Seminar Series at Ranch Santa Ana Botanic Garden
    Friday, March 6

    Dr. Peter Del Tredici, Senior Research Scientist, Arnold Arboretum at Harvard University
    and Adjunct Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture, Harvard Graduate School of Design

    Logos - Konstnarsnamnden, art+environment, ghr

    Blacklisted: A Planted Allegory­ has been produced with support by Konstnärsnämnden / Swedish Arts Grant Committee.

    The exhibition is also generously supported by the GuestHaus Residency, Kungliga Konsthögskolan / Stockholm Royal Institute of Art, and art+environment – an interdisciplinary program at Pitzer College funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

    With very special thanks to:

    Pitzer College

    • Joe Clements, Arboretum and Grounds Manager, Pitzer College
    • Ciara Ennis, Director/Curator, Pitzer College Art Galleries
    • Dr. Paul Faulstich, Professor of Environmental Analysis, Pitzer College
    • Nicolas Galindo, Lead Groundskeeper, Pitzer College
    • Cheukwa Jones, Curatorial/PR Coordinator, Pitzer College Art Galleries
    • Rachel Kessler ’14, Assistant to the artist, Pitzer College
    • Dr. Muriel Poston, Vice President/Dean of Faculty, Pitzer College
    • Lance Neckar, MLA, MALA, Director, Robert Redford Conservancy for Southern
      California Sustainability and Professor of Environmental Analysis, Pitzer College
    • Angelica Perez, Preparator, Pitzer College Art Galleries

    Pomona / BFS

    • Dr. Wallace M. Meyer III, Assistant Professor of Biology, Pomona College and Director of the Bernard Field Station, Claremont, CA
    • Ronald Nemo, Lead Groundskeeper, Pomona College

    Harvey Mudd / BFS

    • Dr. Nancy V. Hamlett, Visiting Professor of Biology, Harvey Mudd College; Volunteer Researcher and Habitat Coordinator at the Bernard Field Station, Claremont, CA

    Keck Science Department, Claremont Colleges

    • Dr. Susan M. Schenk, Biology Laboratory Instructor/Coordinator and Lab Lecturer of Biology, W.M. Keck Science Department, Claremont Colleges

    Scripps College

    • Fred Carlson, Lead Groundskeeper, Scripps College
    • Lola Trafecanty, Director of Grounds, Scripps College
    • Liv Townsend ’14, Documentation Photographer, Scripps College

    Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden

    • Dr. J. Travis Columbus II, Research Scientist; Professor of Botany, Claremont Graduate University
    • Nick Jensen, Master’s Student, Claremont Graduate University Botany Department
    • Evan P. Meyer, Seed Conservation Program Manager, Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden
    • Dr. Jeffery Morawetz, Postdoctoral Researcher, Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden
    • Dr. Mare Nazaire, Herbarium Collections Manager, Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden
    • Irene Holiman, Library Specialist, Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden

    Other Affiliations

    • Jenny Brown, Collection Manager, Ware Collection of Blaschka Glass Models of Plants, Harvard University Herbaria
    • Dr. Peter Del Tredici, Senior Research Scientist, Arnold Arboretum of Harvard; University and Adjunct Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture, Harvard Graduate School of Design
    • Lisa DeCesare, Head of Archives and Public Services, Botany Libraries, Harvard University Herbaria
    • Mary Anne Hamblen, Special Collections & Archives Librarian, Juliette K. and Leonard S. Rakow Research Library, The Corning Museum of Glass
    • Dr. Chris MacDonald, Desert Natural Resources Advisor of Cooperative Extension San Bernardino County, University of California Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources
    • Robert Perry, FASLA, USC School of Artchitecture Adjunct Professor, Professor Emeritus at California State Polytechnic University
    • Nisreen Azar, Habitat Restoration Specialist at Glenn Lukos Associates, Inc.
    • Noreen Murano, President of Wildscape Restoration, Inc. and the CEO of Resource Conservation Partners, Inc.
    • Bill Neill, Desert Protective Council
    • Drew Ready, Sustainable Landscape Program Manager at the Council for Watershed Health


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    Video stills from On the Rocks, In the Land (2013); ©Danielle Adair
  • On the Rocks, In the Land

    Emerging Artist Series #8: Danielle Adair

    September 19 – December 6, 2013
    Lenzner Family Art Gallery

    The documentary-performance-video installation, On the Rocks, In the Land, analyzes the role of the “tourist-observer,” within contemporary “conflict zones,” and questions how a “tourist” perceives and experiences sites of historic and contemporary political significance. The project incorporates experiences of and around the peace lines of Belfast, the Berlin Wall, the stonewalls of New England, the US-Mexican border in Ciudad Juárez, the separation barrier in the West Bank and the Occupy Wall Street Movement. The exhibition explores the notion of “play” as a persistent and ethical form of resistance in relation to the physicality of a “wall” as defined by these specific locations. Meanwhile, in investigating the intersection of place, politics and play in these sites, the project resists the assumption and further enforcement of a dominant narrative.

    On the Rocks, In the Land is in keeping with Adair’s practice of assuming a particular role or responsibility during long-term projects to better examine the institutions and narratives by which we live. In an earlier work, FIRST ASSIGNMENT, Adair took on the role of a “war journalist”, as she embedded as “media” with US servicewomen and followed a unit in training, deployment in Jalalabad, Afghanistan, and upon their return home. This project involved a number of discrete works, including her artist field guide, From JBAD, Lessons Learned (Les Figues Press), and culminated in a long-form video piece. Adair engages with contemporary issues by actively blurring the distinction between documentary and performance praxis. Through the intimacy and particularity of such experience, On the Rocks, In the Land reveals unfamiliar forms of resistance and protest.



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    Image: Untitled (2012); Mixed media; Dimension variable; Courtesy of the artist
  • Crowd Control

    Emerging Artist Series #7: Tannaz Farsi: Crowd Control

    Guest Curator: Tim Berg, assistant professor of art, Pitzer College

    January 26 – March 22, 2013
    Lenzner Family Art Gallery

    you_are_invisible You are Invisible (2012); Mixed media; Dimension variable; Courtesy of the artist

    Tannaz Farsi’s work examines the activity surrounding cultural uprisings and uses liminal moments in our current landscape of events that can speak to individual agency. Farsi’s sources range from the language of advertising to mass-produced, pedestrian objects, such as fluorescent light bulbs, cinder blocks, megaphones and roses, which evoke political protests as well as the globalized economy. This negotiation of the mundane to the historical presents an opportunity to create monuments that aren’t generated through the proclamation of power but by the understanding of human fallibility. Through the relationship of objects, shift of scale and contingency of parts, Farsi embraces the flux of transmission, temporality and site by examining the semiology connected to the construction of meaning in public space.

    The work shown in Lenzner Family Art Gallery will explore language and objects that highlight political divisions by transforming recognizable forms to manifest the perceptual and emotional aspects associated with the visual vocabulary of conflict. By translating material from our contemporary cultural archive, Farsi’s practice is invested in producing speculative realities that allow for subjective intervention.

    About the Artist

    Flag Flag (2012); Mixed media; Dimension variable; Courtesy of the artist

    Tannaz Farsi received her MFA from Ohio University in Athens, OH in 2007 and a BFA summa cum laude from West Virginia University in Morgantown, WV in 2004. Farsi has participated in numerous solo exhibitions including Losing Themselves in a Distance to Far Away Heights at Disjecta in Portland, OR (2011); Of News and Reclamation at Delaware Center for Contemporary Art in Wilmington, DE (2010); The Future Belongs to Crowds at Ohge Ltd, Seattle, WA (2009); ECHOMAKER at The Barron and Elin Gordon Galleries, ODU University in Norfolk, VA (2009); the Formal Absences of Precious Things at Sculpture Center in Cleveland, OH (2008); and Self-Haunted and Synthetic at Siegfried Gallery in Athens, OH (2007). She has also participated in numerous group exhibitions including In Light Richmond at 1708 Gallery in Richmond, VA (2012); The Long Now at Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art in Eugene, OR (2012); Beacons at Urban Institute of Contemporary Art in Grand Rapids, MI (2011); The 9th Northwest Biennial at Tacoma Art Museum in Tacoma, WA (2009); Architecture of Fragments at The New Art Center Gallery in Newtonville, MA (2009); HANDS REMAIN STILL at Tacoma Contemporary in Tacoma, WA (2009); Surreal Systems at Gallery Homeland, PDX Film Festival in Portland, OR (2009); Beginnings and Ends at Gallery 621 in Tallahassee, FL (2009); and 1990 Until Now* at The Winery in Louisville, KY (2007). Farsi was the recipient of Bemis Center for Contemporary Art award in 2008 and Artist Fellowship Grant from Oregon Arts Commission in 2010. In 2011, she was awarded the MacArthur Foundation Travel Grant, the Leon Levy Foundation Grant, the Dean’s Award from the University of Oregon and was the finalist for both The Brink Award of Henry Art Gallery in Seattle, WA and Contemporary Northwest Art Awards from Portland Art Museum in Portland, OR. Farsi was the artist-in-resident at Bernis Center for Contemporary Art in Omaha, NE in 2009 and at MacDowell Colony in Peterborough, NH in 2011. Tannaz Farsi lives and works in Eugene, OR, where she currently serves as an assistant professor of art at the University of Oregon.

    About the Curator

    Tim Berg is assistant professor of art at Pitzer College and a sculptor. Berg and his full-time studio collaborator, Rebekah Myers, have participated in numerous exhibitions including On the brink at Dean Project Gallery in New York, NY (2011); As Luck Would Have It at Nääs Konsthantverk Galleri in Göteborg, Sweden (2009); All Good Things… at Dean Project Gallery in Long Island City, NY (2008); Hope Springs Eternal at Seigfred Gallery at Ohio University in Athens, OH (2007); and Glacial at Ironton Studios in Denver, CO (2007). Over the years, Berg and Myers have participated in numerous group exhibitions in the US, Mexico, South Korea, Sweden and Kuwait. Their work is included in several private and public collections including the Betty Wood­man Collection at the University of Colorado and the Biedermann Museum in Germany. Berg additionally works as a freelance curator and has curated a number of exhibitions including The 67th Scripps Ceramic Annual (2011); Student Exchange Exhibition (2007 and 2004); and Northern Colorado Regional Student Show (2004). Berg received his MFA from the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University in 2003 and BFA magna cum laude from the University of Colorado in Boulder in 2000.

    Related Events

    Opening Reception: Saturday, January 26, 2-4 p.m. at Nichols Gallery

    Artist Lecture: Monday, January 28 at 9:00 a.m. in Lenzner Family Art Gallery



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    Ohm Vanitas
  • Vanitas

    Emerging Artist Series #6: Matthew R. Ohm

    January 21 – March 23, 2012
    Lenzner Family Art Gallery

    Why are there trees I never walk under but large and melodious thoughts descend upon me?
    — Walt Whitman, Song of the Open Road

    The work of Chicago-born but now Long Beach-based artist Matthew R. Ohm focuses on our interactions with the natural world and our need to measure, regulate, possess, and control it.

    The centerpiece of Vanitas is a large installation of whitewashed tree branches suspended above the viewer’s head, casting multiple shadows upon the walls of the gallery. The artist reassembles the discarded limbs, leftovers from the pruning of trees, in a renewed, if fictive, landscape––creating a memento mori to, and from, the dead branches. The installation transforms the gallery into an environment that references the natural world through a theatrical distillation: nature as hunting trophy. The shadows created by the suspended branches echo the former living plants but only as ghosts. They appear on the walls like a macabre William Morris decorative device, a sepulchral swag. Further pruning levels all the branches to create a flat plane overhead thus lowering the ceiling and enlarging the audience to a domineering scale in relation to nature.

    The transforming of trees into skeletal clouds is an absurdist gesture but, arguably, an ad rem response to our abusive stewardship of this planet. With public water sources being sold to private corporations in order that we may purchase, at inflated rates, that which formerly belonged to us; and our relentless encroachment upon, and devastation of, open lands to make room for urban sprawl housing and the raw materials to construct it; is it any wonder that such a fever of willful self-destruction should prove contagious? Mr. Ohm’s editorial environmentalism presents us with such a poetic vision of ecological squalor that we hunger for the next chapter in the serialization of our collapse.

    Matthew R. Ohm received his MFA from California State University, Long Beach in 2009. Ohm, an artist, sculptor and woodworker, has participated in numerous solo exhibitions including, A Majestic Oak Is Just A Crazy Nut Who Stood His Ground at Marilyn Werby Gallery in Long Beach, CA (2009); Trying to Bring the Dead Back to Life at Max L. Gatov Gallery in Long Beach, CA (2007); and Sticks & Stones at Marilyn Werby Gallery in Long Beach, CA (2007). He has also participated in numerous group exhibitions including, Off the Wall at Palos Verde Art Center in Palos Verde, CA (2011); Anarchy at Post Gallery in Los Angeles, CA (2010); Sub-Transient (collaborative show with Tyler Ferreira) at Arts Visalia Gallery in Visalia, CA (2009); Insights 2009 at the University Art Museum in Long Beach, CA (2009); Foehn Documents at The Constant Gallery in Los Angeles, CA (2008); CSULB Six Pack at the Tahoe Gallery in Incline Village, NV (2007); and The Grand Design at Hokin Gallery in Chicago, IL (2006). Ohm has co-curated Hysteria Updated at Max L. Gatov Gallery in Long Beach, CA (2008), Polytheism at Hokin Gallery in Chicago, IL (2005) and White at Little Known Gallery in Chicago, IL (2004). He was the visiting artist at Sierra Nevada College in Incline Village, NV in 2007. Matthew R. Ohm currently lives and works in Long Beach.

    Contributing Writers

    Mark Allen is an artist, educator and curator based in Los Angeles. He is the founder and executive director of Machine Project, a non-profit performance and installation space in Los Angeles. Machine Project also operates as a loose confederacy of artists producing shows at locations ranging from beaches to museums to parking lots. Under his direction Machine Project has produced shows with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Denver, the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis in Missouri, and the Walker Museum in Minneapolis. He has produced more than 500 events in Los Angeles at the Machine Project storefront space, and recently concluded a yearlong artist residency addressing topics of public engagement at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. Allen has taught at the California Institute of the Arts and the University of California San Diego, and is currently an associate professor of art at Pomona College. He serves on the Board of Directors of the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts in New York and on the Advisory Board of the Center for Integrated Media at the California Institute of the Arts in Los Angeles. Allen received his MFA from the California Institute of the Arts following a residency with the Core Fellowship of the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston.

    Thomas Lawson is an artist with a diverse, project-driven output that encompasses painting, writing, editing, curating and teaching. He has been showing paintings and developing temporary public works internationally since the late ʼ70s. Lawson was one of three selectors of the British Art Show in 1995. In the spring of 2009, selections from his older works were included in historical survey shows of the ʼ80s at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and at Le Magasin – Centre National d’Art Contemporain in Grenoble, France. His essays have appeared in Artforum and other art journals, as well as many exhibition catalogues. From 1979 until 1992 he, along with Susan Morgan, published and edited REAL LIFE Magazine. From 2002 until 2009 he was co-editor of Afterall Journal. In 2010 he launched www.eastofborneo.org, an online magazine and archive. A book of selected writings, Mining for Gold, was published by JRP-Ringier, Zurich in 2005 and an anthology of REAL LIFE Magazine was published by Primary Information, New York in 2007. Lawson has received support from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. He has been Dean of the School of Art at the California Institute of the Arts since 1991.

    Related Events

    Opening Reception: Saturday, January 21, 2 – 5 pm

    Artist Lecture: Monday, January 30 at 9 am



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  • Worker

    Emerging Artist Series #5:  James Gilbert & Jennifer Vanderpool

    January 27 – March 25, 2011
    Lenzner Family Art Gallery

    Worker: James Gilbert & Jennifer Vanderpool; Worker (2010 – 2011); Digital image; Dimensions variable; Courtesy of the artistsWorker is a performance-based installation that includes sculptural elements, video and audio, creating a powerful visual and aural experience. A group of anthropomorphic life-size soft sculptures are positioned within an undulating organic and visceral environment, created by a mass of used thrift-store and abandoned clothing stacked and layered from floor to ceiling. A cacophonous hum of buzzing bees and chirping birds make up the soundtrack, which is layered against the clattering of sewing machines in the gallery that produce dissonant and competing sounds. Worker pays homage to the artists’ mothers and their innumerable anonymous counterparts who worked in a textile factory in the late 1950s while simultaneously acknowledging Los Angeles garment workers and their collective action to change sweatshop conditions in Los Angeles factories. Worker draws attention to the alienation of contemporary laborers, their invisibility within the process of mass production and the precarious nature of their employment made infinitely worse by the economic downturn. Both organic and industrial, the soundscape creates an enveloping and all-consuming experience providing a charged and meditative space.

    On opening night, an anthropomorphic sculpture will be created by the artists, Pitzer College students and local participants dressed in repurposed clothes, and material used in the installation symbolically representing the efforts of unseen laborers.

    Related Events

    Opening Reception: January 27, 5-8 p.m.
    Lenzner Family Art Gallery

    Panel Discussion: February 10, 2011, 1:15 p.m.
    Broad Performance Space, Broad Center, Pitzer College
    Panel discussion with artists James Gilbert and Jennifer Vanderpool with Maria Soldatenko, professor of gender and feminist studies/Chicana studies, Pitzer College and Richard Widick, visiting scholar at the Orfalea Center for Global and International Studies, University of California Santa Barbara



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  • Localization, Location, Ubicación

    Emerging Artist Series #4: Carla Herrera-Prats

    January 28 – March 19, 2010

    Lenzner Family Art Gallery

    In the fourth installment of Pitzer’s Emerging Artist Series, Carla Herrera-Prats will transform the Lenzner Family Art Gallery into a collection center holding all the materials—correspondence, agreements, rejection letters and pictures—accumulated in the production of her book Localization, Location, Ubicación.

    In his 1922 book The Gift, Marcel Mauss analyzes different models of a gift economy that can be seen as a form of resistance to an expanding market economy. Mauss describes how the exchange of objects between groups builds relationships among them. Giving a gift triggers an inherent obligation on the part of the receiver to reciprocate the gift. The resulting series of exchanges between groups hence provides one of the earliest forms of social solidarity.

    Localization, Location, Ubicación departs from this notion of solidarity, working with Mauss’s analysis in the context of a regulated system of gift-giving common to us. Carla Herrera-Prats’s project consists of making and donating a gift––in the form of a book–– to a host of libraries, institutions and research centers that deal with questions of immigration, labor, collaboration and art in Canada, the United States and Mexico. This gift functions as a bridge linking the participating institutions together and examines the way knowledge production and art are formed, disseminated and organized. As a “true gift,” the book requires the reciprocity and participation of its receivers to exist. The book itself consists of photographs and descriptions—provided by the participating libraries—of the shelves where Herrera-Prats’s book is to reside once it is printed. Once accepted, the book is put into the libraries’ circulation and distribution system and listed in various subject categories, including art.

     



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  • This Land is Your Land

    Emerging Artist Series #3: Nuttaphol Ma

    September 24 – November 20, 2009
    Lenzner Family Art Gallery

    In the third installment of Pitzer’s Emerging Artist Series, Thai-born, Los Angeles based artist Nuttaphol Ma combines references to Manzanar—an abandoned Japanese relocation camp at the base of California’s Sierra Nevada mountain range—with Woody Guthrie’s missing lyrics from “This Land Is Your Land.” Ma’s site-specific installation explores issues of displacement, migration and survival and asks whether “This Land Is Your Land” is still relevant to today’s new immigrants.

    This Land is Your Land is co-organized with the 18th Street Arts Center, Santa Monica.



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