The Rainbow Wave and the 2020 Election

Thursday, October 15, 2020, 4 p.m. PST
Flyer PDF: The Rainbow Wave and the 2020 Election
Webinar ID: 848 8541 7469
Live Questions & Answers available over Zoom: https://pitzer.zoom.us/s/84885417469

After the crushing disappointment of the 2016 election, Democratic Party voters responded vigorously in 2018. In the words of Van Jones, a “rainbow wave” swept the nation in 2018. Will another rainbow wave emerge and push the Biden-Harris team to victory? The forecast is murky and there is a lot of uncertainty regarding African American, Latino and Asian American voter turnout and their vote choice. In an effort to bring clarity to this issue, President Melvin L. Oliver’s Racial Justice Initiative in conjunction with other sponsors hosts a 2020 elections panel on October 15th from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Join us for a discussion on the presidential campaign. There will be opportunities to ask the panelists questions.

Students, check your email for a zoom link for a post-panel discussion with Sophomore Year Community Assistants (Zawadi Doti and Dani Miller) and Student Affairs staff (Priscilla Cobian and Linda Lam).

Adrian D. Pantoja P’18 and P’24, is Professor of Political Studies and Chicano Studies at Pitzer College, Associate Dean of Faculty, and Senior Analyst for Latino Decisions. He is the author of numerous academic publications, political blogs and policy reports and is frequently interviewed by national and international media. Since 2018 he has worked on the implementation of the Claremont Colleges’ Justice Education Mellon Grant and he is currently chairing President Melvin L. Oliver’s Racial Justice Initiative.

Jane Junn

Jane Junn is the USC Associates Chair in Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science and Gender and Sexuality Studies at the University of Southern California. She is the author of five books on political participation, the politics of race, public opinion on immigration, and gender and politics. Her latest book is about women voters in the United States.

Evelyn Simien

Evelyn M. Simien is a professor in the Department of Political Science and the Director of the Indigeneity, Race, Ethnicity, and Politics (IREP) Master’s degree program at the University of Connecticut. She is the author of Black Feminist Voices in Politics (SUNY Press, 2006); Gender and Lynching: The Politics of Memory (Palgrave/Macmillan, 2011); and Historic Firsts: How Symbolic Empowerment Changes U.S. Politics (Oxford University Press, 2015. Professor Simien is a native of Lake Charles, Louisiana.

Victoria DeFrancesco Soto

Victoria M. DeFrancesco Soto is the Assistant Dean of Civic Engagement at the Lyndon Baines Johnson School of Public Affairs at The University of Texas where she was selected as one of the University’s Game Changing faculty. Named one of the top 12 scholars in the country by Diverse magazine, Victoria previously taught at Northwestern University and Rutgers and received her Ph.D. in political science from Duke University. Victoria is also a contributor to MSNBC and NBCNews.com as well as a regular political analyst for Telemundo.

Co-sponsored by the Agnes Moreland Jackson Diversity Program Fund, the Diversity Committee, the Chicano/Latino Student Affairs Office, the Office of Black Student Affairs, the Center for Asian Pacific American Students, the Office of Student Affairs, and the Mellon Foundation.