Fall 2010 Symposium

ACTUALLY EXISTING DEMOCRACY
(AND WHY IT IS SO LITTLE DEMOCRATIC)

Saturday, 13 November, 12:30-4:30 p.m.

ACTUALLY EXISTING DEMOCRACY (AND WHY IT IS SO LITTLE DEMOCRATIC) features Lisa Hajjar and Daniel HoSang.

Lisa Hajjar is Associate Professor in the Law and Society Program at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She has just returned from the US naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where she has been an observer of the proceedings in the case of Omar Khadr. She will be observing at Guantanamo again, just before our symposium. Her numerous, influential publications include: Human Rights: Critical Concepts in Political Science, Vols. 1-5., co-edited with Richard Falk and Hilal Elver (2008), as well as Courting Conflict: The Israeli Military Court System in the West Bank and Gaza (2005).

Daniel HoSang is Assistant Professor of Ethnic Studies and Political Science at the University of Oregon. His path-breaking book, Racial Propositions: Ballot Initiatives and the Making of Postwar California, will be published in November by the University of California Press. His previous publications include: "The Rise of Racial Liberalism, the Decline of Racial Justice: Lessons from California," in Joe Lowndes, Julie Novkov, and Dorian Warren eds., Race and American Political Development (2008) and "Beyond Policy: Race, Ideology and the Re-imagining of Youth," in S. Ginwright, P. Noguera, and J. Cammarota eds., Beyond Resistance! Youth Activism and Community Change: New Democratic Possibilities for Practice and Policy for America's Youth (2006).

After their presentations, Professors Hajjar and HoSang will be joined for a roundtable discussion with Claremont Colleges faculty Geoffrey Herrera (Pitzer, Political Studies) and Heather Williams (Pomona, Politics).

ACTUALLY EXISTING DEMOCRACY (AND WHY IT IS SO LITTLE DEMOCRATIC) will explore the multitude of factors that diminish, thwart, and pervert democracy in the contemporary U.S. and contemporary world.

FMI: mcsi@pitzer.edu