Spring 2022 Media Studies Courses

Claremont McKenna College

FREN 133 CM-01: Africa in France

TR 1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Since the late 1960s, new generations of French citizens has emerged to redefine France and Frenchness. These new generations are French citizens whose parents or grandparents were originally from North Africa or sub-Saharan Africa, yet who grew up or were born in France, often in the suburbs of major French cities. This course will focus on their experience and more broadly the experience of being African in France in the 21st Century, an experience rooted in migration and colonial history between France and the African continent. Specifically, however, we will also examine the place this new generation occupies in France today through close readings of selected literary and critical texts and through a range of media, old and new, aural and visual. Instructor: Aitel, Fazia [Elective]

KRNT 130 CM-01: Korean Cinema & Culture

TR 11 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

This course examines Korean history, politics, culture, and society through analysis of their representation in contemporary Korean cinema. This course will follow the history of Korea chronologically from Yi Dynasty to the present focusing on the topics such as Confucianism, Colonial period, nationalism, Korean War, national division, military government, democratic movements, and urbanization. The focus of the class will be equally distributed between the films themselves and the historical time and people captured on these films. Knowledge of Korean is not required. Letter grade only. Instructor: Pak, Sooran [Elective]

LIT 036 CM-01: Screenwriting

T 2:45 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

A seminar-workshop on the theory and practice of writing screenplays. We will view films and read scripts in a variety of genres, examine the roles of art, craft, and commerce in writing for film, and discuss in general the enterprise of being a writer. Each student will make substantial progress in the writing of an original screenplay. Prerequisite: written permission of department chair. All registered students must attend the first class. Instructor: Moffett, Kevin [Elective]

LIT 130 CM-01: Introduction to Film

R 2:45 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

From its inception, cinema has often been conceptualized as having a “language” of its own. This course examines that metaphor from aesthetic, cultural, social, and historical perspectives. We will begin with a close analysis of a contemporary popular film, in an effort to “defamiliarize” typical conventions of cinematic expression, and then proceed through a study of multiple movements and genres in the history of film, from German Expressionism to the French New Wave, from Hollywood to documentary to avant-garde and independent filmmaking. Overall, the course is intended to provide students with a broad introduction to film analysis and to the field of Film Studies. Instructor: Schur, Thomas [Intro. Critical]

LIT 131 CM-01: Film History I (1925-1965)

T 2:45 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

This course surveys the history of cinema as art and mass medium, from the introduction of sound to the rise of the “New Hollywood.” Topics such as cinematic response to World War II, the decline of the studio system, and “new waves” of European filmmaking are studied in social, cultural and aesthetic perspectives. Instructor: Schur, Thomas [Media History]

LIT 134 CM-01: Special Studies in Film - Spy Films

TR 4:15 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

A seminar designed to explore the aesthetic achievement and social impact of film as an art form. Subjects for study include such topics as specific film genres, the work of individual film-makers, and recurring themes in film. Each year the seminar concentrates on a different area – for example, “Film and Politics,” “The Director as Author,” or “Violence and the Hero in American Films.” Repeatable for differing topics. The topic for spring 2021 is Spy Films. This course focuses on spy-thrillers. The films are entertainments, but they deal directly with political subjects; they imagine ways of being a patriot, an effective agent, a reliable civil servant, and of pursuing the interests of a state beyond lawful, acknowledged procedures. We will emphasize interpretations that engage these concerns, and look to some essays by political philosophers to guide our analyses. Students will write two papers of about 8 pages, and introduce one film to the class. Their grades will be determined on the basis of (1) the quality of their writing, (2) the acuteness of their analyses, (3) and their class participation. Here are our films: Notorious (1946) North by Northwest (1959) Manchurian Candidate (1962) Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965) Three Days of the Condor (1975) Tinker, Tailor (1979; 2011) Man on Fire (2004) Lives of Others (2006) Traitor (2008) L’Affaire Farewell (2009) Page Eight [Worricker] (2011) Homeland (2011-19) A Most Wanted Man (2014) THIS COURSE WILL BE ENTIRELY SYNCHRONOUS ON ZOOM. ALL STUDENTS ARE EXPECTED TO PARTICIPATE IN ALL MEETINGS OF THE COURSE. NO EXCEPTIONS. Instructor: von Hallberg, Robert [Media History]

LIT 136 CM-01: American Film Genres - The Hollywood Western

MW 1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Mainstream genres can be seen as expressions of American culture’s popular mythology. This course will concentrate on selected genres to examine the social values, issues, and tensions that underlie these narratives and their characteristic ways of resolving fundamental societal conflicts. Students may repeat this course to explore different topics such as Spy Films, Film Noir, Westerns, etc. Prerequisite: FWS 010 CM or permission of the instructor. The genre for fall 2020 will be, “The Hollywood Western.” This course focuses on that most distinctively American of all film genres, the Western. We will explore such themes as wilderness vs. civilization; race relations; gender roles; and notions of American national identity. Students will engage in close study of about 10-12 films, and will read background materials in film criticism, American history, and the culture of the American west. Our main goal will be to achieve a deeper understanding of the Hollywood Western in and of itself and as a significant historical and political phenomenon. In addition, the course seeks to enhance students’ writing skills and to give students more expertise in viewing, understanding, and writing about the great art form of cinema. Written work consists of essays of varying length, a midterm, and take-home final project. Instructor: Warner, Nicholas O. [Media Theory; G/U]

RLST 171 CM-01: Religion & Film

W 6 p.m. – 10 p.m.

This course employs critical social, race, gender, and post-colonial theories to analyze the role of religious symbols, rhetoric, values, and world-views in American film. After briefly examining film genre, structure, and screenwriting, the course will explore religious sensibilities in six genres such as: Historical Epic, Action/Adventure, Science Fiction, Comedy, Drama, and Politics. Instructor permission required. Instructor: Espinosa, Gaston [Elective]

SPAN 179 CM-01: Mexican Cinema in New Millennium

TR 2:45 p.m. – 4 p.m.

W 7 p.m. – 10 p.m.

The popularity of Mexican cinema has grown recently, thanks to a number of films that have done very well at the box office and won recognition at international film festivals. This course explores the development of Mexican cinema in the 21st-century (2000-2010), focusing on the most innovative filmmakers. It examines thematic and stylistic variety in films dealing with history, politics, gender, democracy, and society. We also will consider Mexican filmmakers that are filming in Hollywood such as Alfonso Cuarón, Guillermo Del Toro and Alejandro Cuarón as well as the impact of globalization in Mexican film production. Prerequisite: Spanish 100 or higher. Instructor: Velazco, Salvador [Elective]

Harvey Mudd College

MS 120 HM-01: Animal Media Studies

TR 2:45 p.m. – 4 p.m.

This course will examine representations of animals in film – wildlife documentaries, animated features, critter cams, scientific data, and video art – to address fundamental questions about human and animal nature and culture. Animal Studies is an interdisciplinary field in which scholars from philosophy, biology, media studies, and literature consider the subjective lives of animals, the representations of animals in media and literature, and the shifting boundary line between human and animal. In readings, screenings, and discussions, we will consider the cultural and material lives of humans and animals through the lenses of science, art, literature, and film. HSA Writing Intensive: No. Instructor: Mayeri, Rachel [Media Theory]

MS 172 HM-01: Third Cinema

TR 8:10 a.m. – 9:25 a.m.

Emerging in Latin America in the 1960s and 1970s, the notion of Third Cinema takes its inspiration from the Cuban revolution and from Brazil’s Cinema Novo. Third Cinema is the art of political film making and represents an alternative cinematic practice to that offered by mainstream film industries. This course explores the aesthetics of film making from a revolutionary consciousness in three regions: Africa, Asia, and Latin America. HSA Writing Intensive: No. Instructor: Balseiro, Isabel [Media History or Media Theory]

Pitzer College

MS 040 PZ-01: Curatorial Practice

W 2:45 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

This course offers a survey of current practices and debates around curating art, especially contemporary and modern art. Students will review the recent history of these issues, view and critique current exhibitions on view in the Southern California area, and design a hypothetical exhibition of their own. Readings and class presentations will provide a wider critical and historical framework for understanding contemporary debates in curatorial practice. Instructors: Lerner, Jesse and Ennis, Ciara [Media History]

MS 045 PZ-01: Documentary Media

MW 11 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

This course involves production, a historical survey of documentary practices in photography, film and video and a discussion of the ethical and ideological issues raised by the genre. Students will be expected to produce two short documentary projects in any media. Prerequisite: MS 50 or MS 49. Instructor: Kaneko, Ann A. [Media History or Intermediate/Advanced Production]

MS 050 PZ-01: Intro to Film

TR 2:45 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Film and video are often considered to be a distinct semiotic system or art form with their own “language.” This course surveys the variety of structures which can organize moving pictures: from Hollywood continuity editing, Soviet montage and cinema verite to voice-over documentary, talking heads and postmodern voices with no center at all. The course includes silent film, classic Hollywood narrative, avant-garde film and video, documentary and activist video. Enrollment is limited. Instructor: Ma, Ming-Yuen [Intro. Critical]

MS 051 PZ-01: Intro to Digital Media Studies

TR 9:35 a.m. – 10:50 a.m.

An interdisciplinary introduction to digital and electronic media, exploring the relationships between “old” and “new” media forms, the historical development of computer-based communication and the ways that new technologies are reshaping literature, art, journalism, and the social world. Instructor: Esmaeli, Kouross [Intro. Critical]

MS 073 PZ-01: Technology, Capitalism & Race

TR 1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

This course places the concept of “race” as central to critical media as well as science and technology studies. We will study how historians and theorists have discussed the concept as part of the rise of modern capitalist society. We will look at the role of technology as a material force that delineates the parameters of profit accumulation, exploitation, and social distinction in order to better conceptualize the notions of race in our contemporary digital society. Instructor: Esmaeli, Kouross [Media History or Media Theory]

MS 082 PZ-01: Introduction to Video Art

MW 1:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

This is an introductory course in digital video production. This class encourages a critical, creative approach to the medium, non-traditional solutions, and explanation of the history and methodology of independent video and video art. Class session combines hands-on technical training in script writing, storyboarding, camera operation, off-line and non-linear editing, lighting and sound equipment with critical analysis of subject matter, treatment, and modes of address in independent as well as mass media. Prerequisite: MS 049 or 050 or 051 or LIT 130 CM. Instructor: Kaneko, Ann A. [Intro. Production]

MS 087 PZ-01: Media Sketchbook

MW 11 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

This is an intermediate-level video production class. Students are required to complete short (one to two minute) assignments every other week. The objectives of the class are to further refine the skills of shooting, editing, etc. and to develop a critical vocabulary to talk about your work and the work of others. Prerequisite: MS082PZ or MS182HM or LIT030CM or ART148SC. Instructor: Lerner, Jesse [Intermediate/Advanced Production]

MS 097 PZ-01: Contemporary US Media

T 2:45 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

American Media in Trump Era. This course will introduce students to a range of disciplinary and intellectual tools for understanding the media of contemporary US. Theories of media and the new media ecology will form the context for topics such as electoralism and populism; neoliberalism & imperialism; fight for racial, gender and sexual equality; the politics of globalization and anti-globalization; environmentalism; and the cultural formations that lie at the core of these converging issues. Students will be expected to produce their own media projects in dialogue with the mediated images studied in class. Instructor: Esmaeli, Kouross [Media Theory or Intermediate/Advanced Production]

MS 100 AA-01: Asian Americans in Media

MW 4:15 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

This is a historical survey of Asian American involvement in media production, beginning with the Silent Film Era and ending with contemporary projects in film, video and new media. In this course, we will focus on the shifting yet continuous participation of Asians in the production of media in North America and look at how changing political, social and cultural discourses have shaped media representations of Asians throughout this period. Instructors: Kaneko, Ann A. [Media History]

MS 115 PZ-01: Sound, Art, and Power

TR 11 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Sound Art Diversity Media Power An intermediate/advanced level media theory course exploring unique and challenging audio-visual relationships found in experimental media art. Additionally, it argues for diversity within the emerging field of sound studies, as well as art history and criticism, media and cinema studies, and other fields within the human sciences. This course offers students in-depth examination of broad topics in sound, including silence, voice, listening, noise, and the soundscape via specific case studies including voiceover in avant-garde and ethnographic film, the history of racialized violence in the U.S., acoustic architecture, and site-specific sound installations, to name a few. Prerequisites: MS 049 or MS 050, or MS 051, or MS 052. Instructor: Ma, Ming-Yuen [Media History or Media Theory]

MS 121 PZ-01: Cultural Politics of Self Care

TR 2:45 p.m. – 4 p.m.

“Self care” has become a ubiquitous buzzword attached to an enormous variety of practices (including social media and celebrity, entrepreneurship, and the fitness, wellness, and food industries) and has reshaped notions of leisure, work, health, and travel. At the same time, scholars, journalists, and activists have criticized this term as a rebranding of preexisting exclusionary practices around ability, shape and size, access to healthcare and food, and economic position. Positioning this term within a variety of theoretical modes—including media studies, anthropology, global health, disability studies, fat studies, and critical theory—this class will unpack the cultural politics of the term. Prerequisites: MS 049 PZ or MS 050 PZ or MS 051 PZ or Lit 103 CM or ANTH 002 PZ or ANTH 011 OZ. Instructor: Talmor, Ruti [Media Theory]

MS 122 PZ-01: Popular Feminism

M 2:45 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

This course will critically examine trends in feminist scholarship and popular culture in the last twenty years to examine what happens when feminism becomes “trendy.” Using case studies from media representation, blogs, advertising, and social media—such as #metoo, girlboss, girl power, and flawless—this course will interrogate how the positioning of feminism as a brand upholds the structural systems it seeks to undermine. We will use these case studies to think about the ways popular feminist discourse positions intimate relationships, the domestic, the workplace, and social interactions in the contemporary moment and what they expose about the position of women worldwide. Prerequisites: MS 049 and MS 050 and MS 051 or LIT 030. Instructor: Affuso, Elizabeth [Media Theory]

MS 190 JT-01: Senior Seminar

TR 1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Senior Seminar. Jointly-taught seminar designed for senior majors. Review of key issues/theories in media studies. Instructor: Talmor, Ruti [Senior Seminar]

MS 194 PZ-01: Media Arts for Social Justice

MW 1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

This course is a combination of analysis, theory, and hands-on service-learning experience of how media arts mobilize, educate and empower communities. The course will examine working models of media-based community collaboration projects. Students will be linked with non-profit community collaborators (media arts centers, social service and youth service agencies) who are using media as a catalyst for action in their community. Working with site hosts/collaborators, students will work with under-served populations to design, implement and produce unique media collaborations that provoke thought and action. Instructor permission required. Course Fee $150. Prerequisites: MS 082 or ART 148 SC or MS 182 HM or ART 021 PO or ART 141 SC or ART 143 SC. Instructor: Lamb, Gina [Intermediate/Advanced Production]

MS 196 PZ-01: Media Internship

Day & Time: TBA

Internship in media related industry or institution integrated with significant and clear connection to academic curriculum through independent written or production project. Instructor permission required. Students in major only. Prerequisites: MS 049 or MS 050 or MS 051 or LIT 130. Instructor: Affuso, Elizabeth [Elective]

Pomona College

ARHI 144B PO-01: Daughters Africa Art Cinema Love

T 1:15 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Examines visual arts and cultural criticism produced by women from Africa and the African Diaspora (North America, Caribbean and Europe). Students analyze aesthetic values, key representational themes, visual conventions, symbolic codes and stylistic approaches created from feminism’s spirited love of Blackness, Africanness and justice. Complement to AFRI144A AF, Black Women Feminism(s) and Social Change. Letter grade only. Instructor: Jackson, Phyllis J. [Media Theory]

ARHI 186W PO-01: Interrog Whiteness: Race, Sex, Rep

R 1:15 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Interdisciplinary course studying select African disaporan visual arts interrogating linguistic, conceptual, and visual solipsisms contributing to the construction and reproduction of whiteness in aesthetics, studio art, film, video, and social media. Course assignments and activities develop critical visual literacy employing a constructionist approach to the production of knowledge and cultural criticism. Students encouraged to decode and deconstruct interlocking binary oppositions, such as blackness/whiteness, female/male, propaganda/art, modernity/postmodernity, citizen/immigrant, which dominate in Euroethnic intellectual thought, our racially-gendered relations of power, representational practices, and contemporary [white] nationalist visual grammar. Letter grade only. Instructor: Jackson, Phyllis J. [Art History]

ART 020 PO-01: Black and White Photography

MW 1:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

Black and White Photography. Introductory photography course focuses on traditional black and white processes. Readings and lectures about issues, ideas, and photographers give students the opportunity to contextualize their own work within the trajectory of photographic history. Emphasis falls equally on questions of “how?” and “why?” and a final self-directed project allows students to explore their specific interests. Instructor: Auerbach, Lisa Anne [Intro. Production]

FREN 110 PO-01: French Films

TR 2:45 p.m. – 4 p.m.

The aesthetics of a small selection of French films and the cultural, philosophical and political cultures out of which they were produced as an introduction to the major styles, periods, and directors of French cinema. Linguistic, technical and theoretical tools for cinematic analysis in French. Oral and written expression through discussion, essays and oral presentations. Possible filmmakers include Méliès, Renoir, Resnais, Rohmer, Truffaut, Godard, Kurys, Varda, Malle and Garrel. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: FREN044 PO. Instructor: Abecassis, Jack I. [Elective]

MS 049 PO-01: Intro to Media Studies

WF 11 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Introduction to Media Studies. Presents a comprehensive view of the issues important to media studies, including the development of new technologies, visual literacy, ideological analysis and the construction of content. Read theory, history and fiction; view films and television programs; and write research and opinion papers. Same course as SC 49. Instructor: Staff [Intro. Critical]

MS 049 PO-02: Intro to Media Studies

TR 2:45 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Introduction to Media Studies. Presents a comprehensive view of the issues important to media studies, including the development of new technologies, visual literacy, ideological analysis and the construction of content. Read theory, history and fiction; view films and television programs; and write research and opinion papers. Same course as SC 49. Instructor: Klioutchkine, Konstantine [Intro. Critical]

MS 051 PO-01: Intro to Digital Media Studies

TR 1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Introduction to Digital Media Studies. An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of digital and electronic media, exploring the relationships between “old” and “new” media forms, the historical development of computer-based communication and the ways that new technologies are reshaping literature, art, journalism and the social world. Instructor: Moralde, Oscar John Arellano [Intro. Critical]

MS 051 PO-02: Intro to Digital Media Studies

TR 9:35 a.m. – 10:50 a.m.

Introduction to Digital Media Studies. An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of digital and electronic media, exploring the relationships between “old” and “new” media forms, the historical development of computer-based communication and the ways that new technologies are reshaping literature, art, journalism and the social world. Instructor: Boyer, William Douglas Bahng [Intro. Critical]

MS 092 PO-01: Principles of Television Study

MW 1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Television is now at the forefront of political and aesthetic culture in a way that used to be reserved strictly for film, literature, and visual art. Seizing this contemporary moment of TV’s (seemingly) widespread culture legitimation, this course examines the historical development of television study, focusing on concepts such as: flow, immediacy, genre, platform, narrative complexity, liveness, ideology, and bingeing. Letter grade only. Perquisites: MS 049 or MS 050, or MS 051. Instructor: Engley, Ryan [Media History or Media Theory]

MS 125 PO-01: Critical Game Studies

TR 2:45 p.m. – 4 p.m.

This course provides students with the intellectual framework and critical vocabulary to examine video games as media texts via aesthetics: the value of gameplay experiences and how we fit them into our lives. How do we play, and why? The course will also address questions of politics: how can games shape, and how are they shaped by, the current of public life? Who gets to play, particularly along lines of race, gender, sexuality, and class? Live and recorded gameplay demonstrations will provide students with the material for criticism and inquiry, alongside contemporary critical games writing that will serve as models for their own writing projects. Participants do not need previous experience with games or computers, but only a willingness to engage with games and gameplay within a critical context. Prerequisites: MS 049 PO or MS 050 PO or MS 051 PO or MS 092 PO. Instructor: Moralde, Oscar John Arellano [Media History or Media Theory]

MS 144 PO-01: Masculinities

F 1:15 p.m. – 4 p.m.

This course explores how in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, masculinity has served as a constant (and constantly shifting) object of cultural fantasy, inextricable from the changing ways we understand and imagine gender, sex, class, race, and nation. Precisely because, in the US and Europe, white masculinity has named a position (or fantasy) of cultural dominance; one often confused with the ostensibly “universal.” We will focus especially on the minoritarian and situated perspectives on masculinity opened up by nonwhite, trans, queer, and/or feminist writers, theorists, and film-makers. Instructor: Staff [Advanced Theory]

MS 149T PO-01: Seminar: Critical Studies - Core Theories in Media Studies

MW 11 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

An overview of core traditions in Critical Media Studies through in-depth engagement with key texts. This course serves as preparation for the Senior Seminar by consolidating a foundation in critical theory. Areas of focus include the following: The Frankfurt School, The Chicago School, Pragmatism, Structuralism and Post-Structuralism, Semiotics, Feminist Theory, Queer Theory, Psychoanalytical Theory, Postcolonial Theory, and Critical Race Theory. Prerequisites: MS 049 PO or MS 050 PO or MS 051 PO and one upper-level theory class MS 147 or MS 048 or MS 149. May be repeated once for credit. Instructor: Engley, Ryan [Media Theory]

MUS 096B PO-01: Electronic Music Studio

MW 1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Laboratory course designed to continue developing electronic compositions using techniques of analog and digital synthesis. Permission of instructor required. Prerequisite: MUS 096A PO. Instructor: Staff [Elective]

THEA 001A PO-01: Basic Acting: Tools & Fundamentals

MW 1:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

Basic Acting: Tools & Fundamentals. This introductory course explores the fundamentals of voice, movement, relaxation, text analysis, characterization and sensory and emotional-awareness exercises. Course material includes detailed analysis, preparation and performance of scenes. Instructor: Knox, Jill [Elective]

THEA 001A PO-02: Basic Acting: Tools & Fundamentals

TR 1:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

Basic Acting: Tools & Fundamentals. This introductory course explores the fundamentals of voice, movement, relaxation, text analysis, characterization and sensory and emotional-awareness exercises. Course material includes detailed analysis, preparation and performance of scenes. Instructor: Staff [Elective]

THEA 001A PO-03: Basic Acting: Tools & Fundamentals

MW 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Basic Acting: Tools & Fundamentals. This introductory course explores the fundamentals of voice, movement, relaxation, text analysis, characterization and sensory and emotional-awareness exercises. Course material includes detailed analysis, preparation and performance of scenes. Instructor: Knox, Jill [Elective]

THEA 001A PO-04: Basic Acting: Tools & Fundamentals

TR 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Basic Acting: Tools & Fundamentals. This introductory course explores the fundamentals of voice, movement, relaxation, text analysis, characterization and sensory and emotional-awareness exercises. Course material includes detailed analysis, preparation and performance of scenes. Instructor: Staff [Elective]

THEA 002 PO-01: The Dramatic Imagination

TR 9:35 a.m. – 10:50 a.m.

The visual principles underlying design for live performance: theatre, dance, opera and related fields. The course explores theatre architecture, staging conventions and styles of historic and contemporary design. Readings, discussions and writing are supplemented by creative projects, video showings and attendance at live performances, both on-campus and at professional venues in the Los Angeles area. Instructor: Taylor, James P. [Elective]

THEA 012 PO-01: Interm. Acting: Scene and Voice

MW 1:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

This course continues the investigation of Stanislavski-based acting techniques which began in the Basic Acting class. Students will also explore voice and speech techniques which will aid them in understanding breath support, resonation, and articulation. The teachings of Sanford Meisner and/or Stella Adler are employed as students learn to deepen their connection to contemporary and realistic plays. May be repeated twice for credit. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: THEA 001A PO or THEA001D or THEA 001G PO. Instructor: Ratteray, Carolyn [Elective]

THEA 012 PO-02: Interm. Acting: Scene and Voice

TR 1:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

This course continues the investigation of Stanislavski-based acting techniques which began in the Basic Acting class. Students will also explore voice and speech techniques which will aid them in understanding breath support, resonation, and articulation. The teachings of Sanford Meisner and/or Stella Adler are employed as students learn to deepen their connection to contemporary and realistic plays. May be repeated twice for credit. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: THEA 001A PO or THEA001D or THEA 001G PO. Instructor: Ortega, Giovanni [Elective]

Scripps College

ARHI 185 SC-0: History of Photography

MW 1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Photography from the nineteenth century to the present. The camera as a tool for documentation, portraiture, social comment, journalism, advertising, and as a pure vehicle for personal expression and a point of departure for allied art forms. Instructor: Lum, Julia [Media Theory]

ART 116 SC-01: Intro to Digital Photo

MW 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

A studio art course in digital photography with an emphasis on image production. Students will explore, discuss, and contextualize historical and contemporary uses of photographic media. Student will learn or expand on their skills in Photoshop and Lightroom. Students must have access to a DSL or Lensless camera w/ full manual camera settings. The course will include student presentations, technical assignments, writing assignments, and a final portfolio. Instructor: Gonzales-Day, Ken [Intro. Production]

ART 134 SC-01: Between Analog+Digital Printmkng

TR 2:45 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

The digital print is considered something of a hybrid in the print and photo world. Crossing platforms between the etching studio and the digital art lab, students will create works that integrate both methodologies. Systems including transfer drawing, monoprinting, silk solar plates, digital transfer, and analog and digital printing will be explored. Pre-requisite: Art 141 SC. Fee: $75. Instructor: Macko, Nancy [Intermediate/Advanced Production]

ART 135 SC-01: Experimental Relief Printing

MW 1 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Through open and structured assignments, students will learn the basics of experimental and relief printing. In library and artist visits, the class will explore how artists utilize printmaking with original text to entertain, educate, connect, shift consciousness, and build community. Unique and editioned prints will represent the effort and vision of each student. Instructor: Blassingame, Tia [Elective]

ART 141 SC-01: Introduction to Digital Art

TR 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

This course is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of digital art through the use of digital art software. The curriculum is designed to assist students in approaching their artistic ideas from a fine arts perspective, to draw upon formal elements in art and conceptual issues related to art and technology thus influencing and informing their creative process, projects and goals. Instructor: Macko, Nancy [Intro. Production]

ART 141 SC-02: Introduction to Digital Art

MW 4:15 p.m. – 6:15 p.m.

This course is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of digital art through the use of digital art software. The curriculum is designed to assist students in approaching their artistic ideas from a fine arts perspective, to draw upon formal elements in art and conceptual issues related to art and technology thus influencing and informing their creative process, projects and goals. Instructor: Charlesworth, Vivian [Intro. Production]

ART 142 SC-01: Intermediate Digital Art

TR 1:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

This intermediate level course will explore digital approaches, history, concepts and techniques within the realms of art and design. Assignments will develop proficiency in a range of programs including Adobe InDesign and Illustrator. This is not intended to be a technical training course. Prerequisite: ART 141. Instructor: Ogasian, Alyson [Intermediate/Advanced Production]

ART 143 SC-01: Adv Digital Art

TR 4:15 p.m. – 6:45 p.m.

This advanced level course will build upon techniques, methodologies and approaches developed in Intermediate and Introductory Digital Art. Assignments will develop proficiency in a range of software in conjunction with digital fabrication techniques. Advanced Digital Art will encourage cross-disciplinary experimentation; the relationship between physical and digital space will be interrogated. Prerequisite: Art 141 SC, Art 142 SC. Fee: $75. Instructor: Ogasian, Alyson [Intermediate/Advanced Production]

ART 147 SC-01: Int/Adv Digital Photography

MW 1:15 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.

This course will provide the student with an opportunity to gain an in-depth understanding of digital color photography. Working with Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom, students will learn advanced image editing skills and image management, and be given the opportunity to combine digital with film, large format, and wet darkroom techniques. Course will include readings and student presentations on contemporary photography. Digital SLR camera recommended. Prerequisite: Art 141 or Art 145. Laboratory fee: $75. Instructor: Gonzales-Day, Ken [Intermediate/Advanced Production]

ART 149 SC-01: Intermediate Video Art

TR 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Students continue to develop digital video projects and experiment with expanded video practices such as creating motion graphics for video using Adobe software; projections, installations, and additional video forms. Production is augmented by critiques, screenings, and discussions of conceptual and formal ideas. This course may be taken twice for credit. Prerequisite: ART 148 SC or equivalent. Fee $75. Instructor: Tran, Kim-Trang T. [Intermediate/Advanced Production]

ART 181T SC-01: Digital Art Theories/Concepts

TR 1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

This upper-division course provides an in-depth look at the history and methodologies underlying contemporary art practices and is intended to provide students with an opportunity to explore, research, and write on visual culture. Connecting contemporary art practice to the wider history of art, topics may include uses of photography in the 19th century, the avantgarde in Europe, Performance Art, Conceptual Art, Minimalism, Installation Art, Pop Art, and contemporary practices. Repeatable for credit with different topics. Instructor: Tran, Kim-Trang T. [Media Theory] 

FGSS 188B SC-01: Adv Top: Queer Rep Film & Video

TR 2:45 p.m. – 4 p.m.

This course examines queer representations that intervene into film/video production and consumption. Here, “queer” describes strange, odd, or uncanny film/video content. It also refers to racial, gender, and sexual representations that diverge from heterosexual, patriarchal, and national representational norms. We attend to strategies filmmakers use to code non-normative depictions despite filmmaking prohibitions. We also consider the role film/video play in facilitating and challenging the late twentieth-century globalization of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender identities. In turn, we develop queer methodologies-reading practices and materialist analyses-to understand how film/video shape and intercept social norms, economic imperatives, and institutions of power. Instructor: Cheng, Jih-Fei [Media Theory]

FREN 127 SC-01: French Contemp Women Directors

W 2:45 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

The first film director in the history of narrative cinema was a French woman, Alice Guy-Blaché, who, starting in 1896, made over a 1000 films during her lifetime. Even though early precursors like Guy-Blaché, were often erased from film history, women directors in France have a long tradition to draw from. It is this tradition of women filmmaking that we will explore in this course, focusing in particular on a new generation of women directors who today are revitalizing contemporary French cinema. Directors studied include: Guy, Dulac, Epstein, Varda, Akerman, Denis, Palcy, Sciamma, Maïwenn, Benguigui, Braillat, Ducournau. This course introduces students to the art of cinema, its language and techniques, as well as to film analysis. Taught in French with weekly screenings. Prerequisite: FREN044 or equivalent required. Note that the course will be conducted entirely in French and that some of the films will be screened without subtitles. Note: Monday night film screenings. Instructor: Rachlin, Nathalie M. [Elective]

GERM 111 SC-01: Leaden Times: Film After 1968

MW 4:15 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

More than 50 years on, 2021 looks a lot like 1968 did: widespread political upheaval and economic crises; global war, mass migration, unresolved fights for equality and civil rights, student revolts, violent political terror, deteriorating welfare states… And cinema was there to record it all. In fact, no other period in international cinema has been more impactful than the late 1960s. This comparative film history class discusses some of Germany’s most influential/controversial political films of the time in conversation with a selection of international productions of and since 1968. Features a thorough introduction to film theory and film analysis. Taught in German. Instructor: Vennemann, Kevin [Elective]

ITAL 140 SC-01: Italian Cinema

TR 2:45 p.m. – 4 p.m.

This course will explore the history and criticism of Italian cinema from its origin to the 21st century through the showing of a number of iconic films and the criticism surrounding them. It will also help student better understand contemporary Italian history through film. Taught alternately in Italian and English. Instructor: Ovan, Sabrina [Elective]

MS 054 SC-01: Intermediate Computational Media

Courste Time: TBA

This course focuses on the creation of three-dimensional computational forms for media studies and arts practice. Students explore spatial design, motion, and visualization in augmented, virtual, and extended reality (XR) by way of a variety of softwares ranging from Tinkercad to Blender to Adobe Spark. The course centers on the process of reflection and critique, including visits from practicing artists who will share their work and expertise in XR. This course is designed as an intermediate production course for media studies majors and minors and for all students who have taken an introductory production course and/or have some experience with programming. Instructor: TBA [Intermediate/Advanced Production]

MS 082 SC-01: Introduction to Video Art

TR 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

This class is an introduction to the fundamentals of video production, encouraging a creative approach to the medium through an open-ended engagement with different techniques and modalities found in documentary and other filmmaking practices. The goal is to familiarize students with the use of the video camera, microphones and sound recording equipment, tripod, and non-linear editing systems. The class is critique-driven: the discussions that follow the screening of each exercise are the principal method by which the successes and shortcomings of that work are evaluated. Students will create 5 2-minute video works. All assignments will be carefully explained long before the due date. Pending faculty approval. Instructor: Wing, Carlin [Intro. Production]

MS 190 JT-02: Senior Seminar

TR 1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Senior Seminar. Jointly-taught seminar designed for senior majors. Review of key issues/theories in media studies. Instructor: Wing, Carlin [Senior Seminar]

SPAN 140 SC-01: Spanish Transition Almodovar

MW 1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Pedro Almodóvar is one of the most recognizable auteur directors in Europe today. This course studies Pedro Almodóvar’s development from his directorial debut to the present, from the “shock” value of the early films to the award-winning mastery of the later ones. Prerequisites: SPAN 044 SC and SPAN 101 SC. Instructor: Sanjuan, Carmen. [Elective]