Spring 2023 Media Studies Courses

Claremont-McKenna College

KRNT 130 CM-01: Korean Cinema & Culture

T/R, 01:15-02:30 PM; RN Room 103 (Roberts North)

This course examines Korean history, politics, culture, and society through analysis of their representation in contemporary Korean cinema. This course will follow the history of Korea chronologically from Yi Dynasty to the present focusing on the topics such as Confucianism, Colonial period, nationalism, Korean War, national division, military government, democratic movements, and urbanization. The focus of the class will be equally distributed between the films themselves and the historical time and people captured on these films. Knowledge of Korean is not required. Letter grade only.

Instructor: Pak, S. [Elective]

LIT 036 CM-01: Screenwriting

M/W, 02:45-04:00PM; KRV Room 167 (The Kravis Center)

A seminar-workshop on the theory and practice of writing screenplays. We will view films and read scripts in a variety of genres, examine the roles of art, craft, and commerce in writing for film, and discuss in general the enterprise of being a writer. Each student will make substantial progress in the writing of an original screenplay. All registered students must attend the first class. Instructor permission required.

Instructor: Moffett, K. [Elective]

LIT 130 CM-01: Introduction to Film

W, 02:45-05:30PM; KRV Room 100 (The Kravis Center)

From its inception, cinema has often been conceptualized as having a “language” of its own. This course examines that metaphor from aesthetic, cultural, social, and historical perspectives. We will begin with a close analysis of a contemporary popular film, in an effort to “defamiliarize” typical conventions of cinematic expression, and then proceed through a study of multiple movements and genres in the history of film, from German Expressionism to the French New Wave, from Hollywood to documentary to avant-grade and independent filmmaking. Overall, the course is intended to provide students with a broad introduction to film analysis and to the field of Film Studies. Sophomores and Juniors only.

Instructor: Schur, T. [Introduction to Critical Studies]

LIT 132 CM-01: Film History II (1965-Present)

M/W, 02:45-04:00PM; RN Room 15 (Roberts North)

This course surveys the history of cinema as art and mass medium, from 1965 to the present. Topics such as the rise of independent filmmaking in America, the conglomeration of the studios, and European resistance to Hollywood’s domination on the world market are considered in social, cultural, and aesthetic terms.

Instructor: Morrison, J. [Media History]

LIT 134C CM-01: Special Studies In Film

T/R, 01:15-02:30PM; RS Room 102 (Roberts South)

A seminar designed to explore the aesthetic achievement and social impact of film as an art form. Subjects for study include such topics as specific film genres, the work of individual film-makers, and recurring themes in film. Each year the seminar concentrates on a different area – for example, “Film and Politics,” “The Director as Author,” or “Violence and the Hero in American Films.” Repeatable for differing topics. The topic for spring 2023 is “Spy Films”. This course focuses on spy-thrillers. The films are entertainments, but they deal directly with political subjects; they imagine ways of being a patriot, an effective agent, a reliable civil servant, and of pursuing the interests of a state beyond lawful, acknowledged procedures. We will emphasize interpretations that engage these concerns, and look to some essays by political philosophers to guide our analyses.

Instructor: von Hallberg, R. [Media History]

LIT 163 AF-01: North African Literature/Culture

T/R, 01:15-02:30PM; RN Room 104 (Roberts North)

This course is an introduction to North African Studies which offers an overview of North African literature and culture, through a selection of the works of some of the most important North African authors from diverse ethnic backgrounds (Arab, Berber, French and Jewish). In addition, we will consider a selection of films, photographs, and other visual culture which will provide further insights into the complex social political and religious fabric of each country and the region as a whole. And, of course, we will consider music, which, along with poetry, is a cultural practice and form which is oral and an essential aspect of the everyday life in North Africa.

Instructor: Aitel, F. [Elective]

RLST 125 CM-01: Race/Religion in Hollywood Films

T, 06:00-10:00PM; RS Room 104 (Roberts South)

This course critically examines how Blacks, Latinos/as, and Native Americans have been depicted and socially constructed in Hollywood-distributed films over the past century. We start by exploring screenwriting and critical theories about film, race, religion, gender, and social change and then how Hollywood has served as a vehicle for both affirming racial-ethnic stereotypes and/or challenging and resisting them in their desire to rewrite the visual narrative of American history. We analyze and interpret how film can function as a vehicle for racial, religious, political, gender, and/or social commentary, conscientization, protest, and reconciliation. Instructor permission required.

Instructor: Espinosa, G. [Elective]

Harvey-Mudd College

MS 190 JT-02: Senior Seminar

M/W, 02:45-04:00PM; SHAN Room 2407 (Shanahan Center)

Jointly-taught seminar designed for senior majors. Review of key issues/theories in media studies.

Instructor: Mayeri, R. [Capstone]

Pitzer College

MS 050 PZ-01: Introduction to Film

T/R, 11:00AM-12:15PM; TBA (To Be Assigned)

Film and video are often considered to be a distinct semiotic system or art form with their own “language.” This course surveys the variety of structures which can organize moving pictures: from Hollywood continuity editing, Soviet montage and cinema verité to voice-over documentary, talking-heads and postmodern voices with no center at all. The course includes silent film, classic Hollywood narrative, avant-garde film and video, documentary and activist video. First-years and sophomores only.

Instructor: Ma, M-Y. [Introduction to Critical Studies]

MS 051 PZ-01: Introduction to Digital Media Studies

T/R, 11:00AM-12:15PM; TBA (To Be Assigned)

An interdisciplinary introduction to digital and electronic media, exploring the relationships between “old” and “new” media forms, the historical development of computer-based communication and the ways that new technologies are reshaping literature, art, journalism, and the social world. First-years and sophomores only.

Instructor: Esmaeli, K. [Introduction to Critical Studies]

MS 060 PZ-01: Creative Coding

R, 01:15-04:00PM; TBA (To Be Assigned)

Creative Coding is an introductive course to DIY electronics, algorithmic art practices, and creative coding via various hardware and software applications. Each class is a hybrid of work survey, technology instruction, and hands on workshop.

Instructor: Pagoaga, M. [Introduction to Production]

MS 087 PZ-01: Media Sketchbook

M/W, 11:00AM-12:15PM; TBA (To Be Assigned)

This is an intermediate-level video production class. Students are required to complete short (one to two minute) assignments every other week. The objectives of the class are to further refine the skills of shooting, editing, etc. and to develop a critical vocabulary to talk about your work and the work of others. [Prerequisite: MS 82.]

Instructor: Lerner, J. [Intermediate/Advanced Production]

MS 093 PZ-01: Experimental Media Studio

T, 02:45-05:30PM; TBA (To Be Assigned)

An intermediate production course that engages with media practices outside of the traditional single-channel film or videotapes made for broadcast or screening in a theatre. New genres and hybrid media forms including installation, performance, and tactical media are explored through a series of readings, lectures, presentations, and creative assignments in both individual and group projects. First-years required instructor permission. [Prerequisite: MS 82, or other Intro to Video Art, Digital Art or relevant studio art or music course.]

Instructor: Ma, M-Y. [Intermediate/Advanced Production]

MS 097 PZ-01: Contemporary U.S. Media

R, 01:15-04:00PM; TBA (To Be Assigned)

American Media in Trump Era. This course will introduce students to a range of disciplinary and intellectual tools for understanding the media of contemporary US. Theories of media and the new media ecology will form the context for topics such as electoralism and populism; neoliberalism & imperialism; fight for racial, gender and sexual equality; the politics of globalization and anti-globalization; environmentalism; and the cultural formations that lie at the core of these converging issues. Students will be expected to produce their own media projects in dialogue with the mediated images studied in class. First-years require instructor permission.

Instructor: Esmaeli, K. [Media Theory or Intermediate/Advanced Production]

MS 099 PZ-01: Advanced Editing

W, 07:00-09:50PM; TBA (To Be Assigned)

This course integrates the theory and history of editing with instruction in on-line non-linear video editing. Reading and viewing assignments will complement hands-on editing exercises. [Prerequisite: Introduction to Video Production-MS 82 PZ, MS 182 HM, Art 148 SC or equivalent]

Instructor: Kaneko, A. [Intermediate/Advanced Production]

MS 100 AA-01: Asian Americans in Media

W, 02:45-05:30PM; TBA (To Be Assigned)

This is a historical survey of Asian American involvement in media production, beginning with the Silent Film Era and ending with contemporary projects in film, video and new media. In this course, we will focus on the shifting yet continuous participation of Asians in the production of media in North America and look at how changing political, social and cultural discourses have shaped media representations of Asians throughout this period.

Instructor: Kaneko, A. [Media History]

MS 120 PZ-01: Social/Media

M, 02:45-05:30PM; TBA (To Be Assigned)

This course will consider how social media is impacting personal communication, consumption practices, and media industries. Through case studies of social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, and related spaces students will theorize the role of interactivity in contemporary popular culture. This class will consider how social media impacts narrative form, political engagement, performance of self, and cultural conceptions of reading/authorship. In addition to discussing the media industry’s use of social media platforms as sites of promotion, participation, and surveillance, students will produce critical media analyses using these platforms as part of their coursework. [Prerequisite: MS 49, 50, MS 51 or LIT 130.]

Instructor: Affuso, E. [Media History or Media Theory]

MS 124 PZ-01: Self Representation of Islam & Middle East in US Media

T, 02:45-05:30PM; TBA (To Be Assigned)

Course examines the way media producers of Muslim and MidEastern background are representing themselves in contemporary American Media. We will look at history of representations of Islam and MidEast in order to understand how filmmakers, TV producers, social media influencers & celebrities are defining their identity today. The course will also study what it means to “self represent” in general and study examples of feminist and queer self-representation and the way these identities intersect with Islamic and Mid Eastern identity. In the process we will see how being “Muslim”, “Middle Eastern”, and “American” are being redefined in our contemporary mediascape. First-years require instructor permission.

Instructor: Esmaeli, K. [Media History or Media Theory]

MS 190 JT-01: Senior Seminar

M/W, 02:45-04:00 PM; WST Room Q116

Jointly-taught seminar designed for senior majors. Review of key issues/theories in media studies.

Instructor: Lerner, J. [Capstone]

MS 194 PZ-01: Media Arts for Social Justice

M/W, 01:15-02:30PM; TBA (To Be Assigned)

This course is a combination of analysis, theory, and hands-on service-learning experience of how media arts mobilize, educate and empower communities. The course will examine working models of media-based community collaboraiton projects. Students will be linked with non-profit community collaborators (media arts centers, social service and youth service agencies) who are using media as a catalyst for action in their community. Working with site hosts/collaborators, students will work with undeserved populations to design, implement and produce unique media collaborations that provoke thought and action. Course Fee $150 [Prerequisite: MS 82, MS 182, ART 21, ART 141, ART 143, or ART 148]

Instructor: Lamb, G. [Intermediate/Advanced Production]

MS 196 PZ-01: Media Internship

M/W, 01:15-02:30PM; TBA (To Be Assigned)

Internship in media related industry or institution integrated with significant and clear connection to academic curriculum through independent written or production project. May be taken twice for credit. Pass/NC only. Instructor permission required. [Prerequisite: MS 49, MS 50, MS 51 or LIT 130]

Instructor: Affuso, E. [Elective]

Pomona College

ARHI 141A PO-01: Represent Africa: Art, History & Film

T, 01:15-04:00PM; LE Room 110 (LeBus Court)

Seminar centers on independent African films to examine (re)presentations of the people, arts, cultures and socio-political histories of Africa and its Diaspora. Course critically examines the cinematic themes, aesthetics, styles and schools of post-independence African and African Diasporic filmmakers. Letter grade only. Seniors need permission.

Instructor: Jackson, P. [Media Theory]

ARHI 178 PO-01: Black Aesth/Poli Representation

R, 01:15-04:00PM; LE Room 110 (LeBus Court)

Course examines the visual arts (including painting, sculpture, photography, prints, textiles, mixed media, installations, performance, independent film and video) produced by people of African descent in the United States from the colonial era to the present. Emphasis on Black artists’ changing relationship to African arts and cultures, the emergence of an oppositional aesthetic tradition interrogating visual constructs of “Blackness” and “Whiteness,” gender, sexuality and class as a means of revisioning representational pratices. Course provides a social-historical frame for the interpretation and analysis of form, content and the production of historically situated cultural criticism. Letter grade only. Seniors need permission.

Instructor: Jackson, P. [Media Theory]

ART 020 PO-01: Black and White Photography

T/R, 09:35AM-12:05PM; STAR Room 214 (Studio Arts)

Black and White Photography. Introductory photography course focuses on traditional black and white processes. Readings and lectures about issues, ideas, and photographers give students the opportunity to contextualize their own work within the trajectory of photographic history. Emphasis falls equally on questions of “how?” and “why?” and a final self-directed project allows students to explore their specific interests. Instructor permission required.

Instructor: Auerbach, L. [Introduction to Production]

ART 021 PO-01: Foundations of 2D Design

T/R, 01:15-03:45PM; STAR Room 215 (Studio Arts)

Foundations of 2D Design is a hands-on introduction to the principles of visual design. Instructor permission required.

Instructor: Lofchie, R. [Introduction to Production]

JPNT 176 PO-01: Time & Space in Modern Japan

M/W, 02:45-04:00PM; MA Room 220 (Mason Hall)

This course offers an interdisciplinary, comparative approach to the literary expression of Japanese temporal and spatial concepts from the 8th century onward, with some reference to China and Korea. The focus, however, is on modern Japan, which in some ways “left Asia,” looking ahead to a very foreign time-space but trying to comprehend it with a language that does not even have a future tense.

Instructor: Kurita, K. [Elective]

MS 049 PO-01: Introduction to Media Studies

T/R, 02:45-04:00PM; MA Room 5 (Mason Hall)

Introduction to Media Studies. Presents a comprehensive view of the issues important to media studies, including the development of new technologies, visual literacy, ideological analysis and the construction of content. Read theory, history and fiction; view films and television programs; and write research and opinion papers. Same course as SC 49.

Instructor: Klioutchkine, K. [Introduction to Critical Studies]

MS 049 PO-02: Introduction to Media Studies

T/R, 01:15-02:30PM; CR Room 02 (Crookshank Hall)

Introduction to Media Studies. Presents a comprehensive view of the issues important to media studies, including the development of new technologies, visual literacy, ideological analysis and the construction of content. Read theory, history and fiction; view films and television programs; and write research and opinion papers. Same course as SC 49. First-year students and sophomores only. 

Instructor: Boyer, W. [Introduction to Critical Studies]

MS 051 PO-01: Introduction to Digital Media Studies

M/W, 01:15-02:30PM; CR Room 08 (Crookshank Hall)

Introduction to Digital Media Studies. An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of digital and electronic media, exploring the relationships between “old” and “new” media forms, the historical development of computer-based communication and the ways that new technologies are reshaping literature, art, journalism and the social world.

Instructor: Moralde, O. [Introduction to Critical Studies]

MS 126 PO-01: Video Games and Media Discourse

M/W, 02:45-04:00PM; CR Room 08 (Crookshank Hall)

How does a medium become gendered or racialized? Whose voices, images, and bodies come to delimit a medium? In this course, we will investigate the role that para-textual fields such as criticism, marketing, and fandom play in shaping media culture, with video games and game cultures as a paradigmatic case study. Historical examples from games will be supplemented with theories of criticism and discourse to create a starting point for student-developed media research projects. [Prerequisite: MS 049 SC, MS 050 PZ, or MS 051 SC.]

Instructor: Moralde, O. [Media History or Media Theory]

MS 148D PO-01: Powers of Pleasure

T, 01:15-04:00PM; CR Room 8 (Crookshank Hall)

This course interrogates John Fiske’s contention that “pleasure may be the bait on the hook of hegemony, but it is always more than this; it always involves an element that escapes the system of power.” With this claim in mind, we will: 1) evaluate key arguments in the field regarding pleasure’s complicity with dominant ideological frameworks–particularly with regard to normative views of gender, race, class and sexuality; 2) consider ways in which the critique of pleasure itself may collude with patriarchal, racist, clasist and heteronormative systems of thought; and 3) explore the possibilities for pleasure to undermine established systems of power. Letter grade only. [Prerequisites: MS 049 PO, MS 050 PO, and MS 051 PO.]

Instructor: Friedlander, J. [Media Theory]

MS 149T PO-01: Seminar: Critical Core Theories in Media Studies

R, 01:15-04:00PM; CR Room 08 (Crookshank Hall)

An overview of core traditions in Critical Media Studies through in-depth engagement with key texts. This course serves as preparation for the Senior Seminar by consolidating a foundation in critical theory. Areas of focus include the following: The Frankfurt School, The Chicago School, Pragmatism, Structuralism and Post-Structuralism, Semiotics, Feminist Theory, Queer Theory, Psychoanalytical Theory, Postcolonial Theory, and Critical Race Theory. [Prerequisites: MS 049 PO, MS 050 PO, or MS 051 PO, and one upper level theory class (MS 147 PO – MS 149 PO)]. May be repeated once for credit.

Instructor: Friedlander, J. [Media Theory]

MS 174 PO-01: Film Noir

M, 07:00-09:50PM; TR, 01:15-02:30PM; CR Room 10 (Crookshank Hall)

This course offers a detailed exploration of film noir from its emergence in the classical Hollywood tradition of the 1940s to the present. We will study film noir’s roots in German Expressionism, Depression-Era gangster movies, and film adaptations of hard-boiled detective fiction. We will also consider the unique cultural factors in post-World War II America that gave rise to film noir and its enduring legacy in the French New Wave, its 1970s revival in American grind-house cinema, and the resurgence of ‘neo-noir’ in contemporary American cinema and abroad.

Instructor: Wynter, K. [Media History]

MS 175 PO-01: "Horror" and The American Horror

W, 07:00-09:50PM; TR, 02:45-04:00PM; CR Room 10 (Crookshank Hall)

Of all the film genres that partition and divide the products of American cinema, the horror genre has proven to be the most durable and the most easily adaptable to the shifting historical circumstances and socio-political anxieties to which it runs parallel. This course examines some of the key factors that have contributed to the horror genres capacity to maintain its continued viability in popular culture across a wide range of media including graphic novels, video art, and interactive gaming. Beginning with the modern period of the American horror film and then expanding beyond its physical and ideological borders, this course is designed to encourage students to challenge the ideas that have become associated with the term “horror,” and to consider whether some other term or terms may be better suited to describe the types of feelings horror films and its related forms of media actually inspire. We will consider some of the following questions: What is horror? Do horror genre films truly inspire horror or are we, as participants, moved by some other affect or response? Is it possible to locate cinematic representations of horror and its experience outside of the horror genre? [Prerequisites: MS 049 PO, or MS 050 PO, or MS 051 PO or equivalent.] Letter grade only.

Instructor: Wynter, K. [Media Theory]

MUS 091 PO-01: Sound, Cognition, and History

M/W/F, 11:00-11:50AM; THAT Room 109 (Thatcher Music Bldg)

This multi-disciplinary course examines sound as a cultural and technological artifact. Surveying recent scholarship in cognitive science, history, musicology, media studies and psychoacoustics, we study film, music, historical recording devices and other technologies, architectural and urban spaces and other sites of sound in the world from roughly 1500 to the present.

Instructor: Cramer, A. [Elective]

MUS 096B PO-01: Electronic Music Studio

M/W, 01:15-02:30PM; THAT Room STDO (Thatcher Music Bldg)

Laboratory course designed to continue developing electronic compositions using techniques of analog and digital synthesis. Instructor permission required. [Prerequisite: MUS 096A PO.]

Instructor: Flaherty, T. [Elective]

RUSS 183 PO-01: Comedy in Russian Literature and Film

W, 07:00-09:40PM; MA Room 5 (Mason Hall)

Introduction to comic works of film and fiction from the 19th and 20th centuries. Textual analysis, class discussion, oral reports, composition, advanced work on grammar and stylistics. [Prerequisites: RUSS 044 PO or equivalent.]

Instructor: Rudova, L. [Elective]

RUST 110 PO-01: Russian and East European Cinema

T/R, 01:15-02:30PM; MA Room 5 (Mason Hall)

A survey of Russian and Eastern European film from Soviet to post-Soviet times. Focus on the most innovative films and directors from Russia, Poland, Czechoslovakia (and its successor states), Hungary, and former Yugoslavia in their relation to social, cultural, and political discourses. The course includes such topics as the communist past and its aftermath, aesthetics and ideology, historical memory, migration, human trafficking, ethnicity, and gender. Film genres, styles, and basic notions of film theory.

Instructor: Rudova, L. [Elective]

THEA 001A PO-01: Basic Acting: Tools & Fundamentals

M/W, 10:00AM-12:30PM; TE Room 120 (Seaver Theatre)

Basic Acting: Tools & Fundamentals. This introductory course explores the fundamentals of voice, movement, relaxation, text analysis, characterization and sensory and emotional-awareness exercises. Course material includes detailed analysis, preparation and performance of scenes. First-year students only.

Instructor: TBA [Elective]

THEA 001A PO-02: Basic Acting: Tools & Fundamentals

T/R, 01:15-03:45PM; TE Room 122 (Seaver Theatre)

Basic Acting: Tools & Fundamentals. This introductory course explores the fundamentals of voice, movement, relaxation, text analysis, characterization and sensory and emotional-awareness exercises. Course material includes detailed analysis, preparation and performance of scenes. 
Instructor: Gonzalez Jr., E. [Elective]

THEA 002 PO-01: Introduction to Theatrical Design

T/R, 09:35-10:50AM; TE Room 200 (Seaver Theatre)

This course is an introduction to the design process for a wide range of performance-based productions including theatre, dance, opera, and film. Readings, discussions, and writing are supplemented by creative projects, interviews with Designers in each field and attendance at live performances when possible.

Instructor: Bartenstein, L.  [Elective]

THEA 012 PO-01: Intermediate Acting

M/W, 10:00AM-12:30PM; TE Room 122 (Seaver Theatre)

This course continues the investigation of the tools and techniques explored in the Beginning Acting class. Students will delve into scene study, improvisation, and Stanislavski-based analysis techniques as well as deepen the connection between the truth of their emotional life and how it is expressed vocally and physically. May be repeated twice for credit. Letter grade only. [Prerequisites: THEA 001A PO or THEA 001G PO.]

Instructor: Gonzalez Jr., E. [Elective]

Scripps College

ARHI 185 SC-01: History of Photography

T/R, 11:00AM-12:15PM; ST Room 101 (Steele Hall)

Photography from the nineteenth century to the present. The camera as a tool for documentation, portraiture, social comment, journalism, advertising, and as a pure vehicle for personal expression and a point of departure for allied art forms. Instructor permission required.

Instructor: Lum, J. [Media History]

ART 135 SC-01: Experimental Relief Printing

M/W, 10:00AM-12:00PM; LA Room 100 (Lang Art Building)

Through open and structured assignments, students will learn the basics of experimental and relief printing. In library and artist visits, the class will explore how artists utilize printmaking with original text to entertain, educate, connect, shift consciousness, and build community. Unique and editioned prints will represent the effort and vision of each student. Instructor permission required.

Instructor: Blassingame, T. [Elective]

ART 141 SC-01: Introduction to Digital Art

T/R, 01:15-03:15PM; ST Room 5 (Steele Hall)

This course is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of digital art through the use of digital art software. The curriculum is designed to assist students in approaching their artistic ideas from a fine arts perspective, to draw upon formal elements in art and conceptual issues related to art and technology thus influencing and informing their creative process, projects and goals. Also listed as MS 041 SC. Instructor permission required.

Instructor: Macko, N. [Introduction to Production]

ART 142 SC-01: Intermediate Digital Art

M/W, 04:15-06:45PM; ST Room 5 (Steele Hall)

This intermediate level course will explore digital approaches, history, concepts and techniques with a fine art context. Intermediate digital art will encourage students to develop mobility and fluidity between mediums and techniques, analogand digital. This approach mirrors the way in which digital media exists in practice for many artists-where the relationship between different ideas and approaches shifts and adapts between projects, and production techniques are significantly determined by conceptin project necessity. Assignments will develop proficiency across a range of programs. This is not intended to be a technical training course. [Prerequisite: Either Art 141, Art 148 or MS82.]

Instructor: Charlesworth, V. [Intermediate/Advanced Production]

ART 143 SC-01: Advanced Digital Art

T/R, 10:00AM-12:30PM; ST Room 5 (Steele Hall)

This advanced level course will build upon techniques, methodologies and approaches developed in Intermediate and Introductory Digital Art. Assignments will develop proficiency in a range of software in conjunction with digital fabrication techniques. Advanced Digital Art will encourage cross-disciplinary experimentation; the relationship between physical and digital space will be interrogated. Instructor permission required. [Prerequisite: Art 141 SC, Art 142 SC.] Fee: $75.

Instructor: Ogasion, A. [Intermediate/Advanced Production]

ART 147 SC-01: Int/Adv Digital Photography

M/W, 10:00AM-12:00PM; LA Room 119 (Lang Art Building)

M/W, 10:00AM-12:00PM; ST Room 5 (Steele Hall)

This course will provide the student with an opportunity to gain an in-depth understanding of digital color photography. Working with Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom, studnets will learn advanced image editing skills and image management, and be given the opportunity to combine digital with film, large format, and wet darkroom techniques. Course will include readings and student presentations on contemporary photography. Digital SLR camera recommended. Instructor permission required. [Prerequisite: Art 141 or Art 145.] Laboratory fee: $75.

Instructor: Gonzalez-Day, K. [Intermediate/Advanced Production]

ART 148 SC-01: Introduction to Video Art

T/R, 01:15-03:15PM; LA Room 214 (Lang Art Building)

A studio course introducing students to the basic techniques of digital video production: camerawork, audio recording, lighting and non-linear editing. Production is augmented by critiques, screenings, and discussions of conceptual and formal ideas. Instructor permission required.

Instructor: Tran, K-T. [Introduction to Production]

ART 149 SC-01: Intermediate Video Art

T/R, 10:00AM-12:00PM; LA Room 214 (Lang Art Building)

This advanced level course will build upon techniques, methodologies and approaches developed in Intermediate and Introductory Digital Art. Assignments will develop proficiency in a range of software in conjunction with digital fabrication techniques. Advanced Digital Art will encourage cross-disciplinary experimentation; the relationship between physical and digital space will be interrogated. Instructor permission required. [Prerequisite: ART 148 or equivalent]. Fee $75.

Instructor: Tran, K-T. [Intermediate/Advanced Production]

ART 181G SC-01: Abjection, Beauty, and Difference

M/W, 01:15-02:30PM; LA Room 119 (Lang Art Building)

Theory Seminar in Art: The Abject, Beauty, and Difference. This course will highlight the intersection of modern and and contemporary art criticism with race and gender issues in contemporary U.S. culture. This course fulfills the art theory requirement for Scripps Art, and/or Media Studies majors. Though not restricted to art majors, this seminar course is intended to help prepare majors for their capstone project. In addition to presentations and exams, students will be expected to produce a final research project/paper.

Instructor: Gonzalez-Day, K. [Media Theory]

CLAS 019 SC-01: Classical Myth in Film

T/R, 11:00AM-12:15PM; HM Room 201 (Humanities Building)

From Cleopatra’s beguiling charms and Medea’s torrid love affair with Jason to Homer’s wily Odysseus, ancient culture still provides material for conceptualizing modern political, racial, social, and sexual issues as imagined in modern Hollywood films and European cinema. This course explores contradictions in the relationship between modernity and antiquity through a study of cinematic adaptations of ancient narratives; central to these discussions are the relationship between aesthetics and politics and the shifting role of culture from common ground to culture industry and beyond. In addition to screening films, students will also read plays, poetry, historical narratives, film criticism, and works of critical theory.

Instructor: Roselli, D. [Elective]

MS 036 SC-01: Worldbuilding

M/W, 11:00AM-12:15PM; ST Room 229 (Steele Hall)

In this course, students will develop and create their own fictional worlds through the process of worldbuilding. Worldbuilding is the practice of creating a fully developed fictionalized environment in which the political, historical, cultural, environmental, philosophical (and more) are fully conceptualized and explored. Throughout the semester, students will engage with different forms of concepting and world-design such as creative writing, storyboarding, digital painting and photobashing in order to understand and visualize their respective worlds. This will ultimately culminate in the creation of a media artwork that portrays a narrative within this created universe. In addition to this, we will engage with a variety of films, artworks, games and more to learn about the process of world creation. Course pending faculty approval.

Instructor: Charlesworth, V. [Introduction to Production]

MS 038 SC-01: Machine Learning for Artists

T/R, 01:15-02:30PM; ARR (Arranged Location)

Machine learning (ML) is a new branch of computer science that provides services for automatic translation and speech recognition (Apple’s Siri, Amazon’s Alexa, Google Assistant), product recommendations (Netflix, Amazon, etc.), transportation (Waymo, Tesla, the City of Copenhagen), and political campaigns (Facebook and Cambridge Analytica). ML is becoming a familiar presence in our lives; computer scientists and developers introduce new applications every day for chatting with humans, recommending the best course of action, and making predictions about the future. In spite of all the press, ML remains daunting to non-specialists. This class seeks to mend this divide. This class will introduce ML concepts to students without prior experience and provide templates to get students working in ML right away. We will study and remake artworks by Mario Klingemann, Anna Ridler, Sougwen Chung, Memo Akten, Helena Sarin, Tom White, and others. They will use techniques such as image segmentation, CycleGAN, pix2pix, and Tensorflow. Students will propose and work on a larger project in the last third of the class. [Prerequisite: Any experience with programming, especially with Python.]

Instructor: Goodwin, D. [Introduction to Production]

MS 041 SC-01: Introduction to Digital Art

M/W, 01:15-03:45PM; ST Room 5 (Steele Hall)

This course is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of digital art through the use of digital art software. The curriculum is designed to assist students in approaching their artistic ideas from a fine arts perspective, to draw upon formal elements in art and conceptual issues related to art and technology thus influencing and informing their creative process, projects and goals. Also listed as ART 141 SC.

Instructor: Charlesworth, V. [Introduction to Production]

MS 049 SC-01: Introduction to Media Studies

M/W, 11:00AM-12:15PM; ST Room 107 (Steele Hall)

This course presents a comprehensive view of the issues important to media studies, including the development of new technologies, visual literacy, ideological analysis and the construction of content. Students will read theory, history, and fiction; view films and television programs; and write research and opinion papers.

Instructor: Moralde, O. [Introduction to Critical Studies]

MS 059 SC-01: Introduction to Python

T/R, 02:45-04:00PM; ST Room 229 (Steele Hall)

This is an introduction to computer programming that supports Scripps College’s interdisciplinary vision. It is for everyone–visual designers, data scientists, and fine artists–who wants to create interactive media and computer graphics. This course links software concepts to principles of visual form, motion, and interaction. Students learn the fundamentals of Python programming (data structures, sequencing, selection and sorting, iteration and recursion, functions, object-oriented code) and use Processing.py to analyze and visualize data, generate drawings and sounds, manipulate images, create interactions for games, use network communication to collect data, and learn how to work with remote data to create environmental simulations. Prior programming experience not required. This course satisfies the pre-requisite for DS2 in Scripps’ Data Science minor.

Instructor: Goodwin, D. [Introduction to Production]

MS 082 SC-01: Introduction to Video

T/R, 10:00AM-12:30PM; LA Room 221 (Lang Art Building)

This class is an introduction to the fundamentals of video production, encouraging a creative approach to the medium through an open-ended engagement with different techniques and modalities found in documentary and other filmmaking practices. The goal is to familiarize students with the use of the video camera, microphones and sound recording equipment, tripod,and non-linear editing systems. The class is critique-driven: the discussions that follow the screening of each exercise are the principal method by which the successes and shortcomings of that work are evaluated. Students will create 5 2-minute video works. All assignments will be carefully explained long before the due date. Instructor permission required.

Instructor: Wing, C. [Introduction to Production]

MS 132 SC-01: Theory of Interaction

R, 02:45-05:30PM; HM Room 105 (Humanities Building)

This course explores cultural techniques and technologies of interaction, including but not limited to games, motion capture, and virtual reality. This semester, we will use the topic of games to unpack notions of interaction within a productive set of limits. Games are interactive media. And more and more, they are everywhere. While Eric Zimmerman calls our present moment the “ludic century,” Alex Galloway describes it as “an era of ludic capitalism.” In this moment, making and playing games ranges across the personal, political, professional, prescribed, and performative. Students will explore central questions in media theory and game studies while developing projects about formal, material, technical, social, and theoretical understandings of interaction. [Prerequisites: MS 049, 050, or MS 051]

Instructor: Wing, C. [Media Theory]

SPAN 140 SC-01: Spanish Transition Almodovar

M/W, 01:15-02:30PM; BL Room 220 (Balch Hall)

Pedro Almodovar is one of the most recognizable auteur directors in Europe today. This course studies Pedro Almodovar’s development from his directorial debut to the present, from the “shock” value of the early films to the award-winning mastery of the later ones. [Prerequisite: Spanish 101.]

Instructor: Sanjuan, C. [Elective]