Notice of Privacy Practices - 02.10.21
Hamilton Health Box

Hamilton Health Box Corporate Office: TMC Innovation Institute 2450 Holcombe Blvd. x+240, Houston, Texas 77021


Your Information.
Your Rights.
Our Responsibilities.

This notice describes how medical information about you may be used and disclosed and how you can get access to this information.

Please review it carefully.

Your Rights

When it comes to your health information, you have certain rights.
This section explains your rights and some of our responsibilities to help you.


Get an electronic or paper copy of your medical record

  • You can ask to see or get an electronic or paper copy of your medical record and other health information we have about you. Ask us how to do this.
  • We will provide a copy or a summary of your health information, usually within 30 days of your request (15 days if you request an electronic record). We may charge a reasonable, cost-based fee.

Ask us to correct your medical record

  • You can ask us to correct health information about you that you think is incorrect or incomplete. Ask us how to do this.
  • We may say “no” to your request, but we’ll tell you why in writing within 60 days.

Request confidential communications

  • You can ask us to contact you in a specific way (for example, home or office phone) or to send mail to a different address.
  • We will say “yes” to all reasonable requests.

Ask us to limit what we use or share

  • You can ask us not to use or share certain health information for treatment, payment, or our operations.
  • We are not required to agree to your request, and we may say “no” if it would affect your care.
  • If you pay for a service or health care item out-of-pocket in full, you can ask us not to share that information for the purpose of payment or our operations with your health insurer.
  • We will say “yes” unless a law requires us to share that information.

Get a list of those with whom we’ve shared information

  • You can ask for a list (accounting) of the times we’ve shared your health information for six years prior to the date you ask, who we shared it with, and why.
  • We will include all the disclosures except for those about treatment, payment, and health care operations, and certain other disclosures (such as any you asked us to make). We’ll provide one accounting a year for free but will charge a reasonable, cost-based fee if you ask for another one within 12 months.
  • You can ask for a paper copy of this notice at any time, even if you have agreed to receive the notice electronically. We will provide you with a paper copy promptly.

Get a copy of this privacy notice

  • If you have given someone medical power of attorney or if someone is your legal guardian, that person can exercise your rights and make choices about your health information.
  • We will make sure the person has this authority and can act for you before we take any action.

Choose someone to act for you

  • You can complain if you feel we have violated your rights by contacting us.
  • You can file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights by sending a letter to 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20201, calling 1-877-696-6775, or visiting www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/complaints/.

File a complaint if you feel your rights are violated

  • We will not retaliate against you for filing a complaint.

For certain health information, you can tell us your choices about what we share.
If you have a clear preference for how we share your information in the situations described below, talk to us. Tell us what you want us to do, and we will follow your instructions.


In these cases, you have both the right and choice to tell us to:

  • Share information with your family, close friends, or others involved in your care
  • Share information in a disaster relief situation
  • Include your information in a hospital directory
  • Contact you for fundraising efforts

If you are not able to tell us your preference, for example, if you are unconscious, we may go ahead and share your information if we believe it is in your best interest. We may also share your information when needed to lessen a serious and imminent threat to health or safety.


In these cases we never share your information unless you give us written permission:

  • Marketing purposes
  • Sale of your information
  • Most sharing of psychotherapy notes

In the case of fundraising:

  • We may contact you for fundraising efforts, but you can tell us not to contact you again.

How do we typically use or share your health information?
We typically use or share your health information in the following ways.


Treat you

  • We can use your health information and share it with other professionals who are treating you.

Example: A doctor treating you for an injury asks another doctor about your overall health condition.


Run our organization

  • We can use and share your health information to run our practice, improve your care, and contact you when necessary.

Example: We use health information about you to manage your treatment and services.


Bill for your services

  • We can use and share your health information to bill and get payment from health plans or other entities.

Example: We give information about you to your health insurance plan so it will pay for your services.


How else can we use or share your health information?
We are allowed or required to share your information in other ways – usually in ways that contribute to the public good, such as public health and research. We have to meet many conditions in the law before we can share your information for these purposes. For more information see: www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/understanding/consumers/index.html.


Help with public health and safety issues

  • We can share health information about you for certain situations such as:
    • Preventing disease
    • Helping with product recalls
    • Reporting adverse reactions to medications
    • Reporting suspected abuse, neglect, or domestic violence
    • Preventing or reducing a serious threat to anyone’s health or safety

Comply with the law

  • We will share information about you if state or federal laws require it, including with the Department of Health and Human Services if it wants to see that we’re complying with federal privacy law.

Respond to organ and tissue donation requests

  • We can share health information about you with organ procurement organizations.

Work with a medical examiner or funeral director

  • We can share health information with a coroner, medical examiner, or funeral director when an individual dies.

Address workers’ compensation, law enforcement, and other government requests

  • We can use or share health information about you:
    • For workers’ compensation claims
    • For law enforcement purposes or with a law enforcement official
    • With health oversight agencies for activities authorized by law
  • For special government functions such as military, national security, and presidential protective services

Respond to lawsuits and legal actions

  • We can share health information about you in response to a court or administrative order, or in response to a subpoena.

Electronic Disclosure and Transmission

  • When making a permitted disclosure, we may do so electronically. For example, we may email your information to another provider who is treating you.

  • We are required by law to maintain the privacy and security of your protected health information.
  • We will let you know promptly if a breach occurs that may have compromised the privacy or security of your information.
  • We must follow the duties and privacy practices described in this notice and give you a copy of it.
  • We will not use or share your information other than as described here unless you tell us we can in writing. If you tell us we can, you may change your mind at any time. Let us know in writing if you change your mind.

For more information see: www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/understanding/consumers/noticepp.html.

Changes to the Terms of This Notice

We can change the terms of this notice, and the changes will apply to all information we have about you. The new notice will be available upon request, in our office, and on our web site.

Effective Date: 5/4/2020

This Notice of Privacy Practices applies to the following organizations:

Health Hub Physicians, Inc., d/b/a Hamilton Health Box, Health Box Physicians, PC and Hamilton Health Box, Inc.

Proceso COVID-19 de Pitzer - 02.10.21

Examen de salud diario de Healthy Pitzer

Health Pitzer es una plataforma de gestión de experiencias que hemos configurado para crear un camino tecnológico para nuestros protocolos y procedimientos COVID-19, incluyendo ese conducto de comunicación entre la comunidad Pitzer y nuestro proveedor de servicios de atención médica, Hamilton Health Box.

A partir del lunes 15 de Febrero, los visitantes que lleguen al campus utilizarán nuestro nuevo formulario de evaluación de salud: www.pitzer.edu/healthypitzer

También puede acceder este formulario:

  • Usando el vínculo en el sitio web principal de Pitzer en Recursos> Formulario de evaluación diaria
  • Agregar este enlace a su teléfono móvil.
  • Escanear el código QR en la señalización fuera de los edificios del campus.
  • Uso del quiosco de iPad cerca del reloj en el sótano de McConnell.

Este nuevo formulario está diseñado para ser compatible con teléfonos móviles, está disponible en español e inglés y utiliza su información de inicio de sesión para completar los campos de identificación para que usted no tenga que hacerlo. Para obtener más instrucciones sobre cómo utilizar el nuevo formulario, visite: https://www.pitzer.edu/information-technology/covid-19/.

Además del formulario de evaluación de salud, esta plataforma le permitirá administrar sus datos personales COVID-19; incluida la programación de exámenes, la recepción de resultados de exámenes y la comunicación / recordatorios sobre los exámenes en el campus.

Tenga en cuenta que la primera vez que inicie sesión en esta nueva herramienta, se le pedirá que brinde su consentimiento y reconocimiento para los formularios relacionados con el proceso de prueba de COVID-19 y nuestro proveedor de servicios de salud, Hamilton Health Box. Si no brinda su consentimiento y reconocimiento, no podrá completar los formularios de evaluación y no se le permitirá ingresar al campus. Este proceso de consentimiento ocurre una sola vez y la próxima vez que inicie sesión en la herramienta, irá directamente al menú principal donde podrá completar su examen de salud diario.


Introducción: Hamilton Health Box

En Hamilton Health Box, su salud y seguridad son nuestra principal prioridad. Nos hemos comprometido a proteger y cuidar a la comunidad de Pitzer College durante la pandemia de COVID-19 mediante el establecimiento de una Clínica de Respuesta COVID-19 privada que permitirá a los profesores y al personal de Pitzer tener acceso directo a asesoramiento médico en el lugar, citas de telesalud, COVID -19 Pruebas y seguimiento personalizado.

Conocer al equipo

River Santee RN, BSN es la enfermera designada por Pitzer. Tiene 6 años de experiencia en el ámbito de la atención aguda con 5 años en el departamento de emergencias. Ella es una apasionada de las universidades de Claremont y la comunidad de Claremont ya que creció localmente. Asistió a Claremont High y su madre y su hermana gemela son ex alumnos de 5C (Pitzer y Scripps).

Dr. Toby Hamilton es el Director Ejecutivo de Hamilton Health Box (HHB), miembro del Colegio Estadounidense de Médicos de Emergencia y certificado por la junta en medicina de emergencia. (M.D., B.S., Universidad Tecnológica de Texas)

Dr. Glenn Davis es el Director Médico de HHB. Está certificado por la junta en medicina interna y pediatría. (M.D., Baylor University; B.S., Texas A&M University)

Cuándo y cómo contactarnos:

Si tiene signos y síntomas asociados con COVID-19 o ha estado en contacto cercano con alguien que dio positivo en la prueba de COVID-19, debe ponerse en cuarentena lo antes posible e informar a Pitzer COVID-19 LÍNEA DIRECTA: 909 -607-2180 x72180 o nurse@pitzer.edu

EMERGENCIA MÉDICA

Si muestra alguno de estos signos, busque atención médica de emergencia de inmediato.

  • Dolor de pecho o dificultad para respirar
  • Nueva confusión o somnolencia excesiva
  • La temperatura alcanza los 103 ° F o más en cualquier momento
  • Fiebre de cualquier temperatura> 99.6 ° F que dura más de tres días

*Esta lista no incluye todas las posibles afecciones potencialmente mortales. Llame a su proveedor médico por cualquier otro síntoma que sea grave o que le preocupe.

Llame al 911 o llame con anticipación a su centro de emergencia local: Notifique al operador que está buscando atención para alguien que tiene o puede tener COVID-19.


Pruebas:

Pruebas de detección:

Proporcionaremos pruebas de detección en el sitio para el personal y los profesores que vienen al campus de forma regular. Esta prueba es para monitorear la prevalencia de las infecciones por COVID-19 en nuestra comunidad y detectar la infección temprano para prevenir brotes. Esto se hará con un hisopo nasal autoadministrado bajo la supervisión / dirección de un profesional médico de Hamilton Health Box. Los resultados se le enviarán por correo electrónico en 24-48 horas.

Las pruebas de detección se llevarán a cabo en el Benson Atrium. Esta ubicación es perfecta para realizar pruebas porque permite un buen flujo de aire y está equipada con un nuevo sistema de ventilación. La frecuencia de las pruebas dependerá de su horario de trabajo y de la frecuencia con la que se encuentre en el campus según la política de pruebas de detección de Pitzer. Su supervisor le notificará sobre su programa de pruebas y cuándo comenzarán las pruebas.

Pruebas de diagnóstico:

Proporcionaremos pruebas de diagnóstico en el lugar para las personas que dan positivo durante una prueba de detección, son sintomáticas de COVID-19 o han estado expuestas a un caso positivo. En estas situaciones, la enfermera de HHB, River Santee, programará una cita con usted para obtener un hisopo de diagnóstico (generalmente el mismo día). Las instrucciones para las pruebas de diagnóstico se darán por teléfono/correo electrónico según sea necesario.

¿Qué sucede si obtengo un resultado positivo o me expongo a alguien que estaba enfermo?

Si en algún momento da positivo en la prueba de COVID-19, la enfermera de Pitzer, River Santee, se comunicará con usted directamente y le dará más instrucciones para el aislamiento, además de proporcionarle recursos y asesoramiento médico.

Hamilton Health Box llevará a cabo medidas de rastreo de contactos para casos positivos para notificar a los contactos cercanos lo antes posible en un esfuerzo por prevenir una mayor propagación del COVID-19. Si se lo considera un contacto cercano, la enfermera River se comunicará con usted de inmediato y le dará instrucciones para ponerlo en cuarentena y realizar más pruebas.

Confidencialidad:

Lo que no compartimos:
Si bien trabajamos en estrecha colaboración con Pitzer, somos un proveedor de atención médica y obligado a mantener la confidencialidad de su información médica privada, como su historial médico, a menos que dé su consentimiento para compartirlo con el Universidad.

Que compartimos:
Como institución de educación superior, Pitzer tiene el mandato del condado de informar los casos positivos entre los empleados que trabajan en el campus al Departamento de Salud Pública para que los funcionarios de salud pública puedan monitorear situaciones potenciales de brotes. Si da positivo en la prueba de COVID-19, compartirá su nombre e información de contacto junto con los resultados positivos de sus pruebas con el departamento de salud pública del condado de Los Ángeles, caso por caso.

También trabajaremos en conjunto con Pitzer HR solo para facilitar el tiempo libre, los beneficios y los recursos para ayudarlo si necesita estar en cuarentena en casa. Esto incluiría notificar a HR sobre cualquier fecha de aislamiento o cuarentena (cuánto tiempo permanecerá fuera del campus) y de un resultado positivo de la prueba, según sea necesario.


DIRECTRICES DE SALUD Y SEGURIDAD

Wear a Mask Wearing a mask or face mask is mandatory on campus, and in public or outdoors per County ordinance. Please refer to the instructions below for proper use of a face mask.

Usar una máscara
El uso de una mascarilla es obligatorio en el campus y en público o al aire libre según la ordenanza del condado. Consulte las instrucciones a continuación para el uso correcto de una mascarilla facial.

Distanciamiento social
Mantenga una distancia mínima de 6 PIES entre usted y los demás en todo momento.

Higiene de manos
Lávese las manos con la mayor frecuencia posible con agua y jabón durante al menos 20 segundos o lávese las manos con un desinfectante para manos a base de alcohol que contenga al menos un 60% de alcohol.

Encuesta de detección diaria de Healthy Pitzer
Se requiere que toda la facultad/personal complete la Encuesta de evaluación diaria de Healthy Pitzer antes de cada día laboral.

Informar síntomas o exposición por contacto cercano Si experiencia síntomas de COVID-19 o ha estado en contacto cercano (más de 15 minutos dentro de 6 pies con o sin máscara) con alguien que dio positivo por COVID-19, llame a la LÍNEA DIRECTA DE COVID-19 de Pitzer: 909-607-2180. Un profesional médico de Hamilton Health Box programará una cita en el campus el mismo día para una evaluación médica, prueba de COVID-19, instrucciones de cuarentena y apoyo para la recuperación.

Siga las instrucciones de cuarentena
Si un profesional médico le ha dado instrucciones de cuarentena o aislamiento, le pedimos que siga esas instrucciones hasta que alguien de Hamilton Health Box le haya indicado que ya no es necesario separarse de los demás.


COMPRENDER LOS SIGNOS Y SÍNTOMAS DEL COVID-19

Fiebre o escalofríos: temperatura corporal superior a 99,6 grados Fahrenheit o sensación de escalofríos o escalofríos

Dolor de garganta o tos: sensación de irritación y dolor en la garganta, tos seca o húmeda

Dificultad para respirar: sensación inesperada de falta de aire, falta de aliento o respiración rápida y difícil

Fatiga: cansancio extremo o sensación de debilidad.

Dolores musculares o corporales: dolor en todo el cuerpo

Dolor de cabeza: dolor continuo o sensación punzante dentro o alrededor de la cabeza

Nueva pérdida del gusto o del olfato: repentinamente incapaz de saborear u oler los alimentos o bebidas que se consumen comúnmente

Congestión: acumulación excesiva de moco o líquidos en las cavidades mucosas (nariz, senos nasales, pecho, ojos)

Nariz que moquea: drenaje excesivo, que va desde un líquido transparente hasta un moco espeso, de la nariz y los conductos nasales.

Nariz que moquea: drenaje excesivo, que va desde un líquido transparente hasta un moco espeso, de la nariz y los conductos nasales.


CONTACTO CERCANO: Para COVID-19, un contacto cercano se define como cualquier persona que estuvo a 6 pies de una persona infectada durante al menos 15 minutos desde 48 horas antes de que la persona comenzara a sentirse enferma hasta el momento en que el paciente estuvo aislado, con o sin máscara.

CUARENTENA: La separación o restricción de movimiento de una persona que puede haber estado expuesta a una enfermedad contagiosa para ver si se enferma.

AISLAMIENTO: El aislamiento separa a las personas enfermas con una enfermedad contagiosa de las personas que no están enfermas.


CONSULTE EL FOLLETO DE PREGUNTAS FRECUENTES PARA COMPRENDER MEJOR COVID-19 Y CÓMO PUEDE PROTEGERSE

Frequently Asked Questions about the Novel CoronaVirus (COVID-19) - 02.10.21

What is the Novel CoronaVirus (COVID-19)?

A novel coronavirus is a new coronavirus that has not been previously identified. The virus causing coronavirus disease in 2019 (COVID-19), is not the same as the coronaviruses that commonly circulate among humans and cause mild illness, like the common cold.


How does the virus spread?

The virus that causes COVID-19 is thought to spread mainly from person to person, mainly through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks. These droplets can land in the eyes, mouths or noses of people who are nearby, or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. Spread is more likely when people are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet), particularly when not wearing face coverings.


What signs and symptoms are associated with COVID-19 infection?

People with COVID-19 have reported a wide range of symptoms – from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus.

COVID-19 Symptoms May Include:

  • Fever or Chills – body temperature above 99.6 degrees fahrenheit or sensation of chills or shivers  
  • Sore Throat or Cough – scratchy, sore sensation in throat, dry or wet cough  
  • Shortness of Breath – unexpectedly feeling out of breath, or winded, or breathing fast and hard  
  • Fatigue – extreme tiredness or feeling of weakness  
  • Muscle or Body Aches – soreness throughout the body  
  • Headache – continuous pain or throbbing sensation in or around the head  
  • New Loss of Taste or Smell – suddenly unable to taste or smell commonly consumed foods or drinks  
  • Congestion – an excessive accumulation of mucus or fluids in mucous cavities (nose, sinuses, chest, eyes)  
  • Runny Nose – excess drainage, ranging from a clear fluid to thick mucus, from the nose and nasal passages.  
  • Nausea – a feeling of sickness with an inclination to vomit.  
  • Vomiting – forcefully expelling the stomach’s contents out of the mouth.  
  • Diarrhea – loose, watery stools that occur more frequently than usual.    

When should I seek Emergency Care if I have COVID-19?

If you show any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately*:

  • Chest pain or trouble breathing
  • New confusion or excessive drowsiness
  • Temperature reaches 103°F or higher at any time
  • A fever of any temperature >99.6°F that lasts more than three days

*This list does not include all possible life-threatening conditions. Please call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.

Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.  


What is close contact?

For COVID-19, a close contact is defined as anyone who was within six feet of an infected person for at least 15 minutes starting from 48 hours before the person began feeling sick until the time the patient was isolated – with or without a mask.


Am I considered to have been in close contact if I was wearing a face mask?

Yes, according to the CDC, you are still considered to have been in close contact even if you were wearing a cloth face covering while you were within 6 feet of an infected person for at least 15 minutes.


What is Quarantine?

Quarantine is a word used to define the separation or restriction of movement of a person who may have been exposed to a communicable disease to see if they become ill.   You will be asked to Quarantine if you experience signs & symptoms of COVID-19, have come into close contact with anyone who has or is suspected of having COVID-19, or while you wait for your test results confirmation.  


What is Isolation?

Isolation separates sick people with a contagious disease from people who are not sick. If you have been diagnosed POSITIVE for COVID-19, you will be asked to isolate for a period of time to be determined by a medical professional.


How do I protect myself and others from contracting COVID-19?

WASH YOUR HANDS OFTEN

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • It’s especially important to wash:
    • Before eating or preparing food
    • Before touching your face
    • After using the restroom
    • After leaving a public place
    • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
    • After handling your cloth face covering
    • After changing a diaper
    • After caring for someone sick
    • After touching animals or pets
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.

AVOID CLOSE CONTACT WITH OTHERS

  • Inside your home: avoid close contact with people who are sick.
    • If possible, maintain 6 feet between the person who is sick and other household members.
  • Outside your home: keep 6 feet of distance (about 2 arms’ length) between yourself and people who don’t live in your household.
    • Remember that some people without symptoms may be able to spread the virus.

 COVER YOUR MOUTH AND NOSE WITH A MASK OR FACE COVER

  • You could spread COVID-19 to others even if you do not feel sick.
  • The mask or cloth face cover is meant to protect other people in case you are infected.
  • Everyone should wear a mask or cloth face cover in public settings and when people who don’t live in their household, especially when other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain.
    • Masks or cloth face coverings should not be placed on children under age two, or anyone who has trouble breathing, is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.
  • Continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The mask or cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.

COVER YOUR COUGHS AND SNEEZES

  • Always cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, or use the inside of your elbow, and do not spit.
  • Throw used tissues in the trash.
  • Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

 CLEAN & DISINFECT

  • Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.
  • Avoid sharing difficult to clean items, including electronic devices, personal grooming items, etc.
  • Keep working, learning and living environments and personal items as clean as possible
  • If surfaces are dirty, clean them. Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.
  • Then, use a household disinfectant. Know the most common EPA-registered household disinfectants.

MONITOR YOUR HEALTH DAILY

  • Be alert for symptoms. Watch for fever, cough, shortness of breath, or other symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Take your temperature if symptoms develop.
    • Don’t take your temperature within 30 minutes of exercising or after taking medications that could lower your temperature, like acetaminophen.
    • Please note that lack of fever does not necessarily mean that you do not have COVID-19.

How does washing your hands with soap and water help prevent COVID-19 infection?

On a molecular level, soap molecules disrupt the fatty layer or coat that surrounds the virus, once the external viral coat is broken down, the virus is no longer able to function. The soap molecules need some time to react with the viral coat and break it up. That is why it is recommended to lather soap and water by rubbing your hands thoroughly for a minimum of 20 seconds each time you wash our hands.

According to the CDC, handwashing is one of the best ways to protect yourself and your family from getting sick. Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.

WARNING: The FDA has recently announced that Methanol is not an acceptable ingredient for hand sanitizers and must not be used due to its toxic effects.


About Face Masks: why, different types, proper wear and care

Why are face masks required in public?

According to the CDC, COVID-19 is thought to spread from person to person, mainly through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses* of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. Spread is more likely when people are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).

For this reason, face masks and social distancing are the most effective ways to protect yourself and protect others from becoming infected with COVID-19.

*COVID-19 can also be transmitted through respiratory droplets that may infect the mucous membranes of the eyes, glasses can serve as a protective barrier for the eyes.

Face Masks

What is the difference between cloth face masks, surgical face masks, and N95 Face Masks?

Cloth Face Masks
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended that people wear cloth face coverings in public to help prevent the spread of COVID-19, regardless of whether they have a fever or other COVID-19 symptoms. There is evidence that COVID-19 can be transmitted by people who don’t have symptoms. Wearing cloth masks helps slow the spread of the virus, which is primarily transmitted from person to person through respiratory droplets produced when we talk, cough or sneeze. The CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in stores and other places where social distancing is hard to maintain, especially in areas where there is significant community-based transmission.

Surgical Masks
Surgical masks (also called medical masks) are loose-fitting, disposable coverings for the nose and mouth. They are intended to be worn by healthcare workers. They are fluid-resistant and protect the wearer against large droplets, splashes and sprays, according to the CDC. They also capture the wearer’s respiratory droplets, helping to protect patients against contamination.

N95 Face Masks:
Per the CDC, N95 Face Masks are not to be worn by the general public as protection from COVID-19. N95 face masks are intended to be tight-fitting. Normally, wearers must pass a “Fit Test” to confirm a proper seal before using one. Due to concerns about a shortage of fit-testing kits and test solutions, OSHA is encouraging employers to prioritize fit-testing for those who must use N95 face masks in high-hazard procedures such when performing COVID-19 Testing on patients, intubating or extubating patients, and treating patients in negative pressure isolation rooms.

How to properly put on your face mask: 

  • Wash your hands before putting on your face mask.
  • Secure the mask over your nose and mouth and secure it under your chin.
  • Ensure that your mask fits securely against the sides of your face.
  • Make sure you can breathe easily.
  • Don’t touch the front surface of your face mask, and, if you do, wash your hands or use hand sanitizer to disinfect​.
  • Don’t wear a face mask under your nose, above the chin, around your neck, up on your forehead, hanging off one ear, or on your arm/elbow.

How NOT to Wear Your Mask

  • Do not wear your mask under your nose.
  • Do not pull your mask under your chin, even to drink.
  • Don’t put the face covering around your neck or up on your forehead
  • Do not wear your mask on your arm/elbow.
  • Do not hang your mask from one ear.

How to properly take off your face mask:

  • Handle only by the ear loops or ties.
  • Carefully remove the face mask by using your fingers to stretch the ear loops away from the face. 
  • Fold outside corners together & discard in trash.
  • For cloth face masks, immediately place in washing machine.
  • Be careful not to touch your eyes, nose, and mouth when removing and wash hands immediately after removing.

How to Wash a Cloth Face Mask:

According to the CDC, masks should be washed after each use. It is important to always remove masks correctly and wash your hands after handling or touching a used mask.

Washing Machine

  • You can include your mask with your regular laundry.
  • Use regular laundry detergent and the warmest appropriate water setting for the cloth used to make the mask.

Dryer

  • Use the highest heat setting and leave in the dryer until completely dry.

Washing by hand

  • Wear gloves and prepare a bleach solution by mixing:
    • 5 tablespoons (1/3rd cup) household bleach per gallon of room temperature water; or
    • 4 teaspoons household bleach per quart of room temperature water.
  • Check the label to see if your bleach is intended for disinfection. Some bleach products, such as those designed for safe use on colored clothing, may not be suitable for disinfection. Ensure the bleach product is not past its expiration date. Never mix household bleach with ammonia or any other cleanser.
  • Soak the mask in the bleach solution for 5 minutes.
  • Rinse thoroughly with cool or room temperature water.

Air dry

  • Lay flat and allow to completely dry. If possible, place the mask in direct sunlight.

Who is at higher risk for serious illness from COVID-19?

Based on currently available information and clinical expertise, older adults and people with underlying medical conditions are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

People of any age with the following conditions are at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19:

COVID-19 is a new disease. Currently there are limited data and information about the impact of underlying medical conditions and whether they increase the risk for severe illness from COVID-19. Based on what we know at this time, people with the following conditions might be at an increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19:


What should people at higher risk of serious illness with COVID-19 do?

In addition to social distancing, practicing hand hygiene, and wearing a mask, those that are at risk for severe illness from COVID-19 should:

  • Continue your medicines and do not change your treatment plan without talking to your healthcare provider.
  • Have at least a 30-day supply of prescription and non-prescription medicines.
  • Do not delay getting emergency care for your underlying medical condition because of COVID-19. Emergency departments have contingency infection prevention plans to protect you from getting COVID-19 if you need care.

About COVID-19 tests: types, limitations, results

TYPES OF COVID-19 TESTS

Diagnostic tests for current infection: If you want to know if you are currently infected with the COVID-19 virus, there are two types of tests: molecular tests and antigen testing.

MOLECULAR TEST (also called PCR tests, viral RNA tests, nucleic acid tests)

How is it done?  Nasal swabs or throat swabs

Where can you get this test?  At a hospital, in a medical office, drive-by testing stations (will be available at the Pitzer campus)

What does the test look for?  Molecular tests look for genetic material that comes only from the virus.

How long does it take to get results?  It depends on lab capacity. Results may be ready the same day, but usually take at least a day or two. Throughout the pandemic, especially lately, delayed turnaround times of up to a week or two have been reported in many places.

What about accuracy?  False negatives — that is, a test that says you don’t have the virus when you actually do have the virus — may occur. The reported rate of false negatives is as low as 2% and as high as 37%.

A molecular test using a deep nasal swab is usually the best option, because it will have fewer false negative results than other diagnostic tests or samples from throat swabs or saliva.

ANTIGEN TEST

How is it done?  A nasal or throat swab.

Where can you get these tests?  At a hospital or doctor’s office.

What does the test look for?  This test identifies protein fragments (antigens) from the virus.

How long does it take to get results?  The technology involved is similar to a pregnancy test or a rapid strep test, with results available in minutes.

What about accuracy?  The reported rate of false negative results is as high as 50%, which is why antigen tests are not favored by the FDA as a single test for active infection.

Tests for past infection

ANTIBODY TEST (also called serologic testing)

How is it done?  A sample of blood is taken.

Where can you get these tests?  At a doctor’s office, blood testing lab, or hospital.

What does the test look for?  These blood tests identify antibodies that the body’s immune system has produced in response to the infection. While a serologic test cannot tell you if you have an infection now, it can accurately identify past infection.
How long does it take to get results?
  Results are usually available within a few days.

What about accuracy?  Having an antibody test too early can lead to false negative results. That’s because it takes a week or two after infection for your immune system to produce antibodies. The reported rate of false negatives is 20%. However, the range of false negatives is from 0% to 30% depending on the study and when in the course of infection the test is performed.

Research suggests antibody levels may wane over just a few months. And while a positive antibody test proves you’ve been exposed to the virus, it’s not yet known whether such results indicate a lack of contagiousness or long-lasting, protective immunity.


If it is clinically indicated that I need to be tested for COVID-19, which type of test will Hamilton Health Box be providing to the Pitzer community?

Hamilton Health Box will be providing diagnostic testing for the Pitzer community through the means of a Molecular PCR Test. This test will be collected using the naso-phyrengeal swab method. A molecular test using a deep nasal swab is usually the best option, because it will have fewer false negative results than other diagnostic tests or samples from throat swabs or saliva.


Are there any limitations to COVID-19 diagnostic tests?

With any diagnostic test, there is the potential for false negatives or false positives. For existing COVID-19 tests in the U.S., there have been reports of false negative tests. False negative tests can occur if a specimen was not properly obtained or if a patient was tested too early or too late in their infection. Laboratory error is also a possible cause of false negative test results. Conversely, false positive reports are less common.


Can someone test negative and later test positive for COVID-19?

Yes, it is possible. You may test negative if the sample was collected too early in your infection. You could also be exposed to COVID-19 after the test and get infected then. Even if you test negative, you still should take steps to  protect yourself and others. See Testing for Current Infection for more information.


About Contact Tracing: what is it, what to expect, data privacy

What is Contact Tracing?

Contact tracing will be conducted by Hamilton Health Box to help prevent the spread of the virus amongst the Pitzer community. In general, contact tracing involves identifying people who have an infectious disease (cases) and their contacts (people who may have been exposed due to close contact) and working with the contacts to interrupt disease transmission. For COVID-19, this includes asking people to either isolate or quarantine.

Contact tracing for COVID-19 typically involves

  • Interviewing people with COVID-19 to identify everyone with whom they had close contact during the time they may have been infectious,
  • Notifying contacts of their potential exposure,
  • Referring contacts for testing,
  • Monitoring contacts for signs and symptoms of COVID-19, and
  • Connecting contacts with services they might need during the self-quarantine period.

To prevent the further spread of disease, COVID-19 contacts are encouraged to stay home and maintain social distance (at least 6 feet) from others until 14 days after their last exposure to a person with COVID-19. Contacts should monitor themselves by checking their temperature twice daily and watching for symptoms of COVID-19.


What happens during contact tracing?

Generally, contact tracing includes the following steps:

  • Case investigation: A medical professional works with the patient to help them recall everyone with whom they have had close contact during the time when they may have been infectious.
  • Contact tracing: The medical professional will begin contact tracing by notifying exposed individuals (contacts) of their potential exposure as rapidly and sensitively as possible, not revealing the infected patient’s identity.
  • Contact support: Contacts are provided with education, information, and support to help them understand their risk, what they should do to separate themselves from others who are not exposed, and how to monitor themselves for illness. In addition, they are informed of the possibility that they could spread the infection to others even if they do not feel ill.
  • Self-quarantine: Contacts are encouraged to stay home, monitor their health, and maintain social distance (at least 6 feet) from others until 14 days after their last exposure to the infected patient, in case they also become ill.

What can a person diagnosed with COVID-19 expect to happen during a contact tracing investigation?

If you are diagnosed with COVID-19, a case investigator from Hamilton Health Box and/or the LA County Health Department may call you to check-in on your health, discuss who you’ve been in contact with, and ask where you spent time while you may have been infectious and able to spread COVID-19 to others. You will also be required to self-isolate, if you are not doing so already.

  • Your name will not be revealed to those you may have exposed, even if they ask.
  • Self-isolation means staying at home in a specific room away from other people and pets, and using a separate bathroom, if possible.
  • Self-isolation helps slow the spread of COVID-19 and can help keep your family, friends, neighbors, and others you may come in contact with healthy.

What will happen with my personal information during contact tracing?

Discussions with health department staff are confidential. This means that your personal and medical information will be kept private and only shared with those who may need to know.

Your name will not be revealed to those you came in contact with. The health department will only notify your close contacts that they might have been exposed to COVID-19.


What can close contacts expect to happen during COVID-19 contact tracing?

If you have been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19, a contact tracer from the health department might contact you to inform you that you’ve been exposed to COVID-19.

You should stay at home and self-quarantine for 14 days, starting from the last day you were possibly exposed to COVID-19. The contact tracer will help identify the dates of your self-quarantine.

  • Self-quarantine means staying home, monitoring your health, and maintaining social distancing (at least 6 feet) from others at all times.
  • If you need to be around other people or animals in or outside of the home, wear a cloth face covering. This will help protect the people around you.
  • If you need support or assistance with self-quarantine, the College may be able to provide assistance.

You should take your temperature twice a day, watch for symptoms of COVID-19, and notify your health department if you develop symptoms. You should also notify people you had close contact with recently if you become ill, so they can monitor their health. If your symptoms worsen or become severe, you should seek medical care. Severe symptoms include trouble breathing, persistent pain or pressure in the chest, confusion, inability to wake or stay awake, or bluish lips or face.


Should I get a flu vaccine this fall? Why is it important for influenza (flu) vaccines to be given during the COVID-19 pandemic?

Per the CDC, annual flu vaccination for 2020-2021is highly recommended for everyone 6 months of age and older, with rare exceptions, because it is an effective way to decrease flu illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths.

Efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19, such as stay-at-home and shelter-in-place orders, have led to decreased use of routine preventive medical services, including immunization services. Ensuring that people continue or start getting routine vaccinations during the COVID-19 pandemic is essential for protecting people and communities from vaccine-preventable diseases and outbreaks, including flu. Routine vaccination prevents illnesses that lead to unnecessary medical visits and hospitalizations, which further strain the healthcare system.

For the upcoming flu season, flu vaccination will be very important to reduce flu because it can help reduce the overall impact of respiratory illnesses on the population and thus lessen the resulting burden on the healthcare system during the COVID-19 pandemic.

A flu vaccine may also provide several individual health benefits, including keeping you from getting sick with flu, reducing the severity of your illness if you do get flu and reducing your risk of a flu-associated hospitalization.


How does domestic or international travel influence your chances of contracting COVID-19?

According to the CDC, Department of State, and the State of California there is ongoing transmission of novel coronavirus within the United States and in destinations throughout the world.

After You Travel:

You may have been exposed to COVID-19 on your travels. You may feel well and not have any symptoms, but you can be contagious without symptoms and spread the virus to others. You and your travel companions (including children) pose a risk to your family, friends, and community for 14 days after you were exposed to the virus. Regardless of where you traveled or what you did during your trip, take these actions to protect others from getting sick after you return:

  • When around others, stay at least 6 feet (about 2 arms’ length) from other people who are not from your household. It is important to do this everywhere, both indoors and outdoors.
  • Wear a mask to keep your nose and mouth covered when you are outside of your home.
  • Wash your hands often or use hand sanitizer (with at least 60% alcohol).
  • Watch your health: Look for symptoms of COVID-19, and take your temperature if you feel sick.

If at any time you develop signs or symptoms of COVID-19 during or after your trip, please quarantine yourself and seek medical attention as soon as possible.

U.S. Citizens Returning from China

Any U.S. citizen returning to the United States who has been in China in the previous 14 days may be subject to up to 14 days of quarantine.

Pitzer’s COVID-19 Process - 02.09.21

Healthy Pitzer Daily Health Screening

Healthy Pitzer is an experience management platform that we’ve configured to create a technological pathway for our COVID-19 protocols and procedures, including that communication conduit between the Pitzer community and our healthcare service provider, Hamilton Health Box.

Beginning Monday, February 15th, visitors coming to campus will use our new health screening form: www.pitzer.edu/healthypitzer

You can also reach this form by:

  • Using the link on Pitzer’s main website under Resources > Daily Screening Form
  • Adding this link to your mobile phone.
  • Scanning the QR code on the signage outside campus buildings.
  • Using the iPad Kiosk near the timeclock in McConnell Basement

This new form is designed to be mobile-phone friendly, available in Spanish, and uses your login information to fill out identifying fields so that you don’t have to. For more instructions on how to use the new form, please visit:  https://www.pitzer.edu/information-technology/covid-19/

In addition to the health screening form, this platform will allow you to manage your personal COVID-19 data; including scheduling testing, receiving test results, and communication/reminders about testing on campus.

Please be aware that the first time you log into this new tool you will be prompted to provide your consent and acknowledgement for forms relating to the COVID-19 testing process and our health services provider, Hamilton Health Box.  If you do not provide your consent and acknowledgement, you will not be able to fill out the screening forms and be permitted on campus.  This consent process is a one-time only occurrence and the next time you log into the tool you will go directly to the main menu where you can fill out your daily health screening.


Introduction: Hamilton Health Box

At Hamilton Health Box, your health and safety is our top priority. We have committed to protecting and caring for the Pitzer College community during the COVID-19 pandemic by establishing a private, COVID-19 Response Clinic that will allow Pitzer faculty and staff to have direct access to onsite medical advice, tele-health appointments, COVID-19 Testing, and personalized follow up care.

Meet the Team

River Santee RN, BSN is Pitzer’s designated nurse.  She has 6 years of experience in the acute care setting with 5 years in the emergency department.  She is passionate about the Claremont colleges and the Claremont community as she grew up locally. She attended Claremont High and her mother and twin sister are 5Cs alumni (Pitzer and Scripps). 

Dr. Toby Hamilton is the CEO of Hamilton Health Box (HHB), a fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians and board-certified in emergency medicine. (M.D., B.S., Texas Tech University)

Dr. Glenn Davis is the chief medical officer for HHB. He is board-certified in internal medicine and pediatrics. (M.D., Baylor University; B.S., Texas A&M University)

When and how to contact us:

If you are experiencing signs and symptoms that are associated with COVID-19 or have come into close contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19, you should quarantine yourself as soon as possible and report it to Pitzer COVID-19 HOTLINE: 909-607-2180 x72180 or nurse@pitzer.edu

Medical Emergency

If you show any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately

  • Chest Pain or Trouble Breathing
  • New Confusion or Excessive Drowsiness
  • Temperature reaches 103°F or higher at any time
  • A fever of any temperature >99.6°F that lasts more than three days

*This list is not all possible life-threatening conditions. Please call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.

Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.


Testing

Screening testing

Testing with nasal swab

We will be providing on site screening testing for staff and faculty who are coming to campus on a regular basis.  This testing is to monitor the prevalence of COVID-19 infections in our community and to catch infection early in order to prevent outbreaks. This will be done with a self-administered nasal swab under supervision/direction from a Hamilton Health Box medical professional.  Results will be provided to you via email in 24-48 hours. 

Screening will take place at the Benson Atrium. This location is perfect for testing because it allows for good airflow and is equipped with a new ventilation system. Frequency of testing will depend on your work schedule and how often you are on campus based on Pitzer’s screening testing policy. You will be notified by your supervisor of your testing schedule and when testing will begin for you.

Diagnostic testing

We will be providing on-site diagnostic testing for individuals who test positive during a surveillance test, are symptomatic of COVID-19 or have been exposed to a positive case. In these situations, HHB nurse River Santee will make an appointment with you for a diagnostic swab (usually same-day). Instructions for diagnostic testing will be given via phone/email as needed.

What happens if I test Positive or am exposed to someone who was sick?

If at any point you test positive for COVID-19, Pitzer’s nurse River Santee will contact you directly and give you further instructions for isolation as well as provide resources and medical advice.

Hamilton Health Box will be conducting contact tracing measures for positive cases to notify close contacts as soon as possible in an effort to prevent further spread of COVID-19.  If you are deemed a close contact River will contact you immediately and give instructions for quarantining and further testing.

Confidentiality:

What we don’t share:
While we are working closely with Pitzer, we are a healthcare providers and obligated to maintain the confidentiality of your private medical information, such as your medical history, unless you consent to sharing it with the College.

What we do share: 
As an institution of higher education, Pitzer is mandated by the county to report positive cases among employees who are working on campus to the Public Health Department so that public health officials can monitor potential outbreak situations. If you test positive for COVID-19, we will share your name and contact information along with your positive test results to the LA county public health department on a case by case basis. We will also work in conjunction with Pitzer HR only to facilitate time off work, benefits, and resources to assist you if you need to quarantine at home.  This would include notifying HR of any isolation or quarantine dates (how long you will remain off campus) and of a positive test result as needed.


Health & Safety Guidelines

Wear a Mask Wearing a mask or face mask is mandatory on campus, and in public or outdoors per County ordinance. Please refer to the instructions below for proper use of a face mask.

Wear a mask

Wear a Mask
Wearing a mask or face mask is mandatory on campus, and in public or outdoors per County ordinance. Please refer to the instructions below for proper use of a face mask.

Social distancing

Social Distancing
Maintain a distance of 6 FEET minimum between yourself and others at all times.

Hand hygiene

Hand Hygiene
Wash your hands as often as possible with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or clean your hands with an alcohol based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

Daily Screening Survey

Healthy Pitzer Daily Screening Survey
All Faculty/staff are required to complete the Health Pitzer Daily Screening Survey before each work day.

Report symptoms or close contact

Report Symptoms or Close Contact Exposure
If you experience symptoms of COVID-19 or have been in close contact (more than 15 minutes within 6-ft with or without a mask) with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19, call the Pitzer COVID-19 HOTLINE: 909-607-2180. A Medical Professional from Hamilton Health Box will schedule a same-day, on-campus appointment for a medical evaluation, COVID-19 test, quarantine instructions, and recovery support.

Follow quarantine instructions

Follow Quarantine Instructions
If you have been given quarantine or isolation instructions by a medical professional, we ask that you abide by those instructions until someone from Hamilton Health Box has indicated it is no longer necessary to separate yourself from others.


Understanding Signs & Symptoms of COVID-19

Coronavirus Prevention

Fever or Chills – body temperature above 99.6 Degrees Fahrenheit or sensation of chills or shivers

Sore Throat or Cough – scratchy, sore sensation in throat, dry or wet cough

Shortness of Breath – unexpectedly feeling out of breath, or winded, or breathing fast and hard

Fatigue – extreme tiredness or feeling of weakness

Muscle or Body Aches – soreness throughout the body

Headache – continuous pain or throbbing sensation in or around the head

New Loss of Taste or Smell – suddenly unable to taste or smell commonly consumed foods or drinks

Congestion – an excessive accumulation of mucus or fluids in mucous cavities (Nose, Sinuses, Chest, Eyes)

Runny Nose – excess drainage, ranging from a clear fluid to thick mucus, from the nose and nasal passages.

Nausea – a feeling of sickness with an inclination to vomit.

Vomiting – forcefully expelling the stomach’s contents out of the mouth.

Diarrhea – loose, watery stools that occur more frequently than usual.


CLOSE CONTACT: For COVID-19, a close contact is defined as anyone who was within 6 feet of an infected person for at least 15 minutes starting from 48 hours before the person began feeling sick until the time the patient was isolated – with or without a mask.

QUARANTINE: The separation or restriction of movement of a person who may have been exposed to a communicable disease to see if they become ill.

ISOLATION: Isolation separates sick people with a contagious disease from people who are not sick.

PLEASE REFER TO THE FAQs TO BETTER UNDERSTAND COVID-19 & HOW YOU CAN PROTECT YOURSELF