Assessment of Co-Curricular Activities
Student Affairs Goals and Student Learning Outcomes

Diversity

Diversity Student Goals – developed by Student Affairs staff at Pitzer. Endorsed by Resident Assistants.

  • 1. Celebrate the rich diversity of people on Pitzer's campus by recognizing and appreciating differences in all forms.
  • 2. Respectfully engage in critical discussions and thought about diversity and the various dimensions of identity.
  • 3. Intentionally support the integration of Pitzer's international, exchange, and bridge program students.
  • 4. Create a supportive environment for people of historically marginalized populations to share personal experiences.

 Diversity Student Learning Outcomes
Students will be able to:

  • 1. Recall at least three campus resources devoted to supporting dialogue and action surrounding issues of diversity.
  • 2. Identify multiple forms of differences.
  • 3. Report at least two on or off campus events that they attended which support diversity.
  • 4. Describe one or more ways in which they personally supported the integration of Pitzer's international, exchange, and/or bridge program students.

Sustainability

Sustainability Student Goal – modified from Statement of Environmental Policy and Principles developed by Pitzer College Council.

Students will incorporate socially and environmentally sound practices into their life and be aware of the impacts of their actions on humanity and the rest of nature.

Sustainability Student Learning Outcomes – modified from outcomes developed by ACPA – College Student Educators International in collaboration with the U.S. Partnership for Education for Sustainable Development.  Endorsed by Pitzer student leaders and Student Affairs Staff involved with sustainability initiatives on campus.

Students will be able to:

  • 1. Define sustainability.
  • 2. Explain how sustainability relates to their lives and their values, and how their actions impact issues of sustainability.
  • 3. Utilize their knowledge of sustainability to change their daily habits and consumer mentality.
  • 4. Describe how to apply concepts of sustainability to the campus community and globally.

Residential Life Program

Student Goals for the Residential Life Program – developed by VP for Student Affairs, Dean of Students, Resident Directors, and Resident Assistants and statements of the College Council.

Through student participation in Pitzer’s Residential Life program students will:

  • 1. Be capable and self-directed individuals.
  • 2. Be engaged and responsible community members.
  • 3. Be aware of issues of social justice and intercultural understanding.
  • 4. Incorporate socially and environmentally sound practices into their life and be aware of the impacts of their actions on humanity and the rest of nature.
  • 5. Gain skills necessary to excel in the academic classroom.

Through Resident Assistants’ employment in Pitzer’s Residential Life program RA’s will:

  • 1. Be capable and self-directed individuals.
  • 2. Be engaged and responsible community members.
  • 3. Be aware of issues of social justice and intercultural understanding.
  • 4. Incorporate socially and environmentally sound practices into their life and be aware of the impacts of their actions on humanity and the rest of nature.
  • 5. Gain skills necessary to excel in the academic classroom.

Through Resident Assistants’ employment in Pitzer’s Residential Life program RA’s will:

  • 1. Build leadership skills as they assist in the development of a community within the hall, floor or tower
  • 2. Be able to appropriately respond in emergency and crisis situations

Student Learning Outcomes for the Residential Life Program

Through student participation in Pitzer’s Residence Halls residents will be able to:

  • 1. Locate the document and explain “The Rights and Responsibilities of Residential Living” and Residents will be able to articulate three skills for resolving conflict in their residential living community
  • 2. Identify multiple forms of diversity in their living group
  • 3. Articulate at least two benefits of living in a diverse community
  • 4. State at least two sustainability practices in which they participate within the residence halls.
  • 5. Describe at least two ways in which they promote a considerate community.
  • 6. Articulate at least one way in which living in the residence halls has supported them in their academic endeavors
  • 7. Recall the individuals they should contact in case of an emergency
  • 8. Define the purpose and function of hall council within the residential halls
  • 9. Complete and submit Facilities Work Orders
  • 10. List the steps they need to complete in order to leave for Winter Break and checkout of the residence halls.

Through Resident Assistants’ employment in Pitzer’s Residence Life program RA’s will be able to:

  • 1. Coordinate small and a large scale programs within the residence halls and across campus.
  • 2. Create bulletin boards with information on campus resources, activities, and educational information.
  • 3. Articulate two reasons for programming and bulletin boards within the residence halls.
  • 4. Define the purpose of the Wellness Wheel in Residence Life programming and will be able to name all the categories.
  • 5. Accurately track their programming budget and submit a receipt for reimbursement.
  • 6. Name every resident living within their individual community.
  • 7. Identify at least three different resource centers available to students as well as each center’s hours of operation and purpose.
  • 8. Recognize symptoms, indicators, and resources for students experiencing anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, alcohol poisoning, self harm, anxiety, depression, suicidal ideation, sexual assault , and substance  abuse.
  • 9. Complete the following administrative tasks including, but not limited to:
    -request money from non-residential life funding sources.
    -submit online programming forms, evaluations, duty logs and incident reports.
    - complete room condition reports.
    -conduct health and safety inspections.
  • 10. Explain evacuation procedures for responding to fire and earthquake related emergencies.
  • 11. Explain the procedures for responding in emergency situations.
  • 12. Describe multiple strategies for confronting residents who infringe upon community standards, and/or violate College policies and/or regulations.
  • 13. List five things that they must check for during a security check. 
  • 14. Be certified in CPR and First-Aid and perform both as necessary.

Mentor Program

Mentor Program Student Goals – developed by Office of Student Affairs Staff, Dean of Students and Resident Director.

Through Mentor employment in Pitzer’s Residential Life program Mentors will:

  • 1. Become a resource for new students, providing information about academics, co-curricular activities, student organizations and involvement.
  • 2. Assist in the development of a community within the new student residence halls.

Mentor Program Student Learning Outcomes

Through Mentor employment in Pitzer’s Residential Life program Mentors will be able to:

  • 1. Demonstrate coordinating a small and a large scale program within the residential halls.
  • 2. Explain the academic advising system and the process of registering for classes.
  • 3. List at least 15 student organizations, and explain how to get more information about them and how to join a student organization
  • 4. Identify at least three different resource centers available to students as well as describe each center’s purpose or mission.

Faculty-in-Residence (FIR)

Faculty-in-Residence (FIR)  Student Goals – developed by VP for Student Affairs, Dean of Students, Associate Dean of Faculty, Assistant Dean of Students, and two current FIRs.

Through interactions with Faculty-in-Residence students will:

  • 1. Become familiar, and develop personal and intellectual relationships, with faculty and their families outside the traditional academic setting.
  • 2. Develop a sense of community with both faculty and other students living in residence.
  • 3. Acquire knowledge about faculty member’s discipline and be exposed to educational and cultural opportunities through programming (e.g., lectures, discussions, and field trips).
  • 4. Learn about Pitzer’s educational objectives and academic advising system.

Faculty-in-Residence (FIR) Student Learning Outcomes

Through interactions with Faculty-in-Residence students will be able to:

  • 1. State the name of at least one Faculty-in-Residence and his or her area of study; and recognize the faculty member’s family.
  • 2. Describe something gained (intellectually, culturally, or socially) through the FIR program.
  • 3. List FIR programs attended and state purpose of programs.
  • 4. Describe how interactions with their academic advisor have been influenced by FIR.

Career Services

Career Services Student Goal – developed by Career Services Director and Career Services staff.
Students who use Career Services’ resources and services will develop life-long skills they can use to seek jobs, internships, apply to graduate school and make career changes.  \

Career Services Student Learning Outcomes

Students will:

  • 1. Be able to identify specific career field interests.
  • 2. Have a professional resume and cover letter to use for job and internship applications.
  • 3. Know how to interview effectively for professional jobs and internships.
  • 4. Identify several strategies for conducting a job or internship search.
  • 5. Have identified professionals in the career field with whom they may network.

Academic Support Services

Academic Support Services Student Goal – developed by Associate Dean of Students and Vice President for Student Affairs.

Students who utilize Academic Support Services will embrace the academic excellence value, and learn about learning, motivation, time management, organization, goal-setting, test-taking, and self-regulation, and apply this knowledge now and later in life. 

Academic Support Services Student Learning Outcomes

Depending on their specific needs, students will be able to:

  • 1. Summarize three principles of motivation.
  • 2. Define what an active learner is.
  • 3. Demonstrate use of a planner, calendar, and note taking strategies.
  • 4. List three strategies for retention of information.

Center for Asian Pacific American Students (CAPAS) Student Goals– developed by CAPAS Director and Advisory Board.

Through the use of the Center and by participation in CAPAS programs, students will:

  • 1. Develop a sense of Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) identity.
  • 2. Become involved or become a leader within the AAPI community.
  • 3. Become aware of issues surrounding the AAPI community.
  • 4. Utilize CAPAS for collaboration and outreach to Pitzer and the greater Claremont College community.

Center for Asian Pacific American Students (CAPAS)

Center for Asian Pacific American Students (CAPAS) Student Learning Outcomes - developed by CAPAS Director and Staff, Office of Student Affairs Staff and Assistant Director of Office of Institutional Research and Assessment

Students will be able to:

  • 1. Create and participate in social, cultural and educational programs that support the Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) community.
  • 2. Access the Asian American resource library and other services (e.g., scholarships).
  • 3. Discuss issues affecting AAPI students.
  • 4. Identify leadership opportunities in the AAPI community on and off campus.

Orientation Adventure (OA)

Orientation Adventure (OA) Student Goals– developed by Assistant Dean of Students and Student Involvement Coordinator.

Students who coordinate the Orientation Adventure program will:

  • 1. Master the leadership, administrative, and other responsibilities of coordinating a 350 person multi-day program.
  • 2. Become successful peer trainers.
  • 3. Represent the OA program in a professional manner.
  • 4. Develop skills that will connect to their future personal and professional goals.

Students who lead Orientation Adventure trips will:

  • 1. Gain leadership and communication skills.
  • 2. Successfully plan, lead and facilitate a multi-day trip with 20 plus participants.
  • 3. Facilitate leadership and community building activities for participants.
  • 4. Understand Pitzer’s core values and connect them to their OA trip.
  • 5. Learn general and specific information about the greater Southern California area (trip specific).
  • 6. Acquire transferable skills.

Students who participate in the Orientation Adventure program will:

  • 1. Build relationships with their peers and returning student leaders.
  • 2. Learn general and specific information about the greater Southern California area (trip specific).
  • 3. Become familiar with Pitzer’s core values and recognize the relationship of the core values to the OA program.
  • 4. Learn more about what Pitzer College has to offer and how they fit into Pitzer College.
  • 5. Develop a desire to become involved on campus when they return from their trips.

Orientation Adventure (OA) Student Learning Outcomes

Students who coordinate the Orientation Adventure program will:

  • 1. Be able to explain how OA contributes to student learning and how OA connects to Pitzer’s core values.
  • 2. Be able to produce succinct and thorough itineraries for student-led trips.
  • 3. Be certified in First aid and CPR skills.
  • 4. Be able to explain the purpose of assessing the OA program.
  • 5. Identify acquired transferable skills.

Students who lead Orientation Adventure trips will:

  • 1. Be able to identify at least two of Pitzer’s core values and explain their connection to the OA program.
  • 2. Demonstrate how to plan, lead and facilitate a multi-day trip with 20-plus participants.
  • 3. Be certified in First-Aid and CPR skills.
  • 4. Identify at least three effective communication skills.
  • 5. Articulate general and specific information about the greater Southern California area (trip specific).

Student Clubs and Organizations

Student Clubs/Organizations Student Goals – developed by Assistant Dean of Student Affairs and Student Involvement Coordinator in consultation with various student leaders and Office of Student Affairs Staff.

Leaders of sponsored clubs and organizations will:

  • 1. Build leadership and communication skills.
  • 2. Know how their club connects to Pitzer’s core and community values.
  • 3. Know how to manage the organizational and financial needs of the club.

Students participating in sponsored clubs and organizations will:

  • 1. Know how their club connects to Pitzer’s core and community values.
  • 2. Be familiar with the leadership structure in the club.
  • 3. Be familiar with the basic organizational and financial operations of the club.
  • 4. Improve communication skills.

Student Clubs/Organizations Student Learning Outcomes

Leaders of sponsored clubs and organizations will be able to:

  • 1. Articulate the procedure/protocol to run a successful meeting.
  • 2. State how leadership is transitioned in their club or organization.
  • 3. Explain how their club connects to Pitzer’s core and community values.
  • 4. Describe the value of budgeting, recording minutes, and archiving historical information pertaining to the club.
  • 5. Explain how to register an event.
  • 6. List three ways to solicit participation.
  • 7. Explain the function of Pitzer’s accounting forms.
  • 8. Identify and utilize appropriate/professional techniques for giving feedback.
  • 9. Name three strategies for resolving disagreement in a meeting.

Students participating in sponsored clubs and organizations will be able to:

  • 1. Explain how their club connects to Pitzer’s core and community values.
  • 2. Identify three attributes of a properly run meeting.
  • 3. Explain the value of recording minutes and historical information pertaining to the club.
  • 4. State how leadership is transitioned in their club or organization.
  • 5. Name three strategies for resolving disagreement in a meeting.

Students who participate in the Orientation Adventure program will:

  • 1. Be able to articulate general and specific information about the greater Southern California area (trip specific).
  • 2. Be able to identify at least one of Pitzer’s core values and explain their connection to the OA program.
  • 3. Describe a way in which they feel they might like to be involved on campus once they return from their trips.
  • 4. Be able to identify group members’ names and a few facts about each group member.

Food Services

Food Services Student Goals – developed by Grove House Kitchen Manager, GM of Food Services, and Office of Student Affairs Staff.
Through Food Services employment students will learn the following:

  • 1. How to communicate effectively with both the kitchen staff and customers.
  • 2. Safety and sanitization skills and compliance.
  • 3. How to effectively organize ingredients and prepare recipes.
  • 4. How to conduct themselves appropriately in a work setting which includes punctuality, attentiveness, time management, and flexibility.
  • 5. Foster job pride and respect for one another as co-workers by emphasizing leadership and assertiveness as a student, worker or manager.

Through eating the cuisine prepared by Food Services, students will:

  • 1. Foster awareness and knowledge about: nutrition, locally sourced food, and the difference between organic and sustainable food.
  • 2. Experience and appreciate different flavor profiles, regional and ethnic cuisines.

Food Services Student Learning Outcomes

hrough Food Services employment students will be able to:

  • 1. Explain food safety/sanitation procedures.
  • 2. Locate safety equipment at their workplace.
  • 3. Demonstrate effective organization of ingredients and recipe preparation.
  • 4. Articulate the importance of punctuality, attentiveness, time management, and flexibility.
  • 5. Name an occasion when they took an assertive and/or leadership role to facilitate a task.

Through eating the cuisine prepared by Food Services, students will be able to:

  • 1. Identify flavors and ingredients typical of at least three regions.
  • 2. Explain the difference between organic and sustainable food.
  • 3. Articulate basic principles of healthy eating.

Jumpstart

Jumpstart Student Goals – developed by Jumpstart National Program, Vice President for Student Affairs, Pitzer Jumpstart Site Manager.
Jumpstart participants will:

  • 1. Gain knowledge of Early Childhood Education.
  • 2. Gain knowledge of social justice issues related to educational opportunities within low-income communities.
  • 3. Develop an ability to work in multi-cultural and diverse environments.
  • 4. Learn value of participation in long-term service.
  • 5. Have a greater interest in and commitment to education and/or educational careers.

Jumpstart Student Learning Outcomes
Jumpstart participants will be able to:

  • 1. Articulate at least three benchmarks of Early Childhood Education.
  • 2. Prepare age-appropriate and high-quality sessions for a preschool child.
  • 3. Describe social justice issues related to educational opportunities within low-income communities.
  • 4. Express the value of long-term service through the completion of a 300-hour term of service.