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Faculty Notes

Professor of Political Studies Jack Sullivan Retires

Jack SullivanPitzer College faculty, staff, alumni, family and friends gathered on April 23 for a dinner honoring Professor of Political Studies Jack Sullivan. Professor of Political Studies Nigel Boyle emceed the evening, which included numerous tributes to Sullivan and his more than thirty years at the College.

“Jack’s guidance has helped me take a methodical approach to addressing societal problems and work towards finding solutions, both large and small,” said Meredith Henry ’01, who now works for The Midnight Mission on Skid Row in Los Angeles.

Over the years, Sullivan has served Pitzer in a wide array of roles including dean of faculty and dean of students, among others. “Whenever the College had an important task that required a wise head and a steady hand, Jack has been the go-to guy for thirty-two years,” said Boyle.

As a political scientist, Sullivan has written important books on both international relations and public policy, as well as many articles on other issues such as ethnic minority health outcomes and AIDS education.

Thomas Poon

Thomas Poon
Thomas Poon, associate professor of chemistry, with co-authors J. Sivaguru, C. Hooper, H. Saito, M. Solomon, S. Jockusch, W. Adam, Y. Inoue and N. J. Turro, published an article title "A Comparative Mechanistic Analsysi of the Steroeselectivity Trends Observed in the Oxidation of Chiral Oxazolidinone-Functionalized Enecarbamates by Single Oxygen, Ozone and Triazolinedione" in the November 2006 issue of Tetrahedron (Symposia-in-Print). Poon gave four presentations at the National Meeting of the American Chemical Society held in Chicago. Chinese and Japanese translations of Poon and W. Brown's Introduction to Organic Chemistry were published by Tsang Hai Book Publishing Co. and Hirokawa Publishing Co., respectively.

Bill Anthes

Bill Anthes
Bill Anthes, assistant professor of art history, gave a lecture titled “Native Modern: American Indian Painting” at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. He also received a Rockefeller Fellowship in Theorizing Cultural Heritage from the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage for his proposal titled “Red Earth, Flat World: Theorizing Native American Cultural Heritage in a Global Age.” Anthes published two chapters titled “Cultural Controversies” and “Native American Art Centers” in The American Midwest: An Interpretive Encyclopedia, edited by A. Cayton, R. Sisson and C. Zacher (Indiana University Press, 2006).

Paul Faulstich

Paul Faulstich
Paul Faulstich, professor of Environmental Studies, wrote a chapter titled “Sacred Places” in MANA: The Power of Things (2007). He also gave a presentation titled “Sustainability: Perspectives from Human Ecology” at the Humanities Roundtable held at Stanford University. Faulstich has been appointed to a two-year term on the Fulbright Association’s Institute of International Education national screening committee.

Kathy Yep

Kathleen S. Yep
Kathleen S. Yep, assistant professor of Asian American Studies and sociology, was selected as a Faculty Fellow for the California Campus Compact–Carnegie Foundation Faculty Fellows Service-Learning for Political Engagement Program. Only twenty-five faculty members from across the state were chosen for this honor. As a Faculty Fellow, Yep will be working with other colleagues from a wide variety of disciplines over the next two years to create, implement and reflect on service learning in at least one of her courses with the goal of increasing students’ understanding, skills and motivation for political participation. Yep also gave a presentation titled “Conversations with my Grandfather: Angel Island, Immigration and Racialized Incarceration” at the Chinatown Library in Los Angeles.

John Norvell

John Norvell
John Norvell, visiting assistant professor of anthropology, gave a talk titled “Faces and Friends: Twenty-odd Years of Online Communities” as part of the Community Conversations lecture series held at Maryville College in Maryville, Tennessee.

Melinda Herrold-Menzies

Melinda Herrold-Menzies
Melinda Herrold-Menzies, assistant professor of Environmental Studies, gave a presentation titled “Boating on the Sea of Grass: Western Development, Tourism, Resistance, and Local Empowerment” at the Annual Meeting for the Association of American Geographers in San Francisco.

Rudi Volti

Rudi Volti
Rudi Volti, professor emeritus of sociology, published an article titled “Mass Motorization in Spain” in the autumn 2006 issue of the Journal of Transport History.

Tessa Hicks

Tessa Hicks
Tessa Hicks, instructor for the Pitzer in Ontario program and the Center for California Cultural and Social Issues, published an article titled “Humanizing the Other in ‘Us and Them’” in Peace Review: A Journal of Social Justice. She gave a presentation titled “Identity Labels and the Performativity of Race” at the Cultural Studies Association Annual Conference at Portland State University. Hicks received a grant, with L. Arguelles and T. Dolan, from L.A. County’s Children Family Council for their proposal titled “Family Economic Success in Los Angeles: A Participatory and Narrative Research Project.”

David Furman

David Furman
David Furman, professor emeritus of art, had an opening reception for his figurative and sculptural ceramics, his forty-second one-person exhibition, at the Armstrong Gallery in Pomona, California. The American Museum of Ceramic Art purchased “The Retirement Dinner” for their permanent collection. His work was also recently exhibited in “Small Favors II” at the Clay Studio in Philadelphia, the Venice Art Walk at Bergamont Station, Santa Monica, California, and the NCECA Figurative Invitational Exhibition at the Amaco Gallery in Indianapolis. Furman’s artwork was featured in the May issue of Art Ltd./West Coast Art+Design, and the May issue of American Art Collector.

Judy Grabiner

Judith V. Grabiner
Judith V. Grabiner, Flora Sanborn Pitzer Professor of Mathematics, will publish her article titled “Why Should Historical Truth Matter to Mathematicians?: Dispelling Myths and Promoting Maths,” in the Bulletin of the British Society for the History of Mathematics. She also gave invited talks for the British Society for the History of Mathematics, the Oxford History of Mathematics Group and the University of Lancaster Statistics Mathematics Group, among others, this spring while a visiting scholar at the University of Leeds, England.

Michael Woodcock

Michael Woodcock
Michael Woodcock, professor emeritus of Creative Studies, exhibited his artwork at two shows: “New Year in Black and White” at the I-5 gallery in Los Angeles and “Ink and Clay 33,” the annual national juried exhibition of prints and ceramics at Cal Poly Pomona. Woodcock’s work has also been recently acquired by the Center for the Study of Political Graphics in Los Angeles and the Phoenix Art Museum in Arizona.

Carmen Fought

Carmen Fought
Carmen Fought, associate professor of linguistics, presented the keynote address titled “Does a Smile Mean Friendship to Everyone?: Language Use in the Multicultural Classroom” at the 13th Annual Graduate TESL/ Linguistics Symposium at Arizona State University. She also gave a presentation at the Los Angeles Unified School District’s Closing the Achievement Gap Conference.

Faculty Bookplate
Jose Calderon

José Calderón
José Calderón, professor of sociology and Chicano/a Studies, published the edited volume Race, Poverty, and Social Justice: Multidisciplinary Perspectives through Service Learning (Stylus Publishing, 2007). Calderón co-authored the fourth chapter with G. Cadena titled “Linking Critical Democratic Pedagogy, Multiculturalism and Service Learning to a Project-Based Approach.” Calderón also compiled and edited with G. L. Ochoa syllabi and instructional material for the sixth edition of Chicano/a and Latino/a Studies in Sociology (American Sociological Association, 2007).



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