Social Innovations Projects with Native American Communities

The Community Engagement Center at Pitzer College, with the support of California Campus Compact Student Leadership Initiative grant presents the “Indigenous Students Expanding Alliances, Access, and Awareness in Higher Education”

Social Innovation Projects. The "Social Innovation Projects" is an umbrella program with several smaller projects/activities which serve to promote student development as well as address economic development for and with local native communities through cultural empowerment, college access and social service collaborations. Through participation in any of the Social Innovation Projects, students will be given opportunities to sustain important relationships with Tribal Nations, expand alliances and interaction with local Native American youth, create new programming, participate in teambuilding, plan events, facilitate agendas, learn intercultural skills, exercise leadership abilities, and assist in public education. The overall goal is to create opportunities for service, learning, understanding, and dialog to take place at a groundbreaking level, to break barriers, to build bridges, and to train leaders for our future. We hope these opportunities serve to bring an upturn in the community’s economy with our service, patronage, publicity and education. Programs in this SLI grant project include: Partnerships with local colleges and tribes, Local Tribal Nations Service Learning Partnerships, MLK, Jr. Day of Service, the Elders In Residence program, the Native American Open House; and Pitzer Native College Pipeline affiliated programs. This grant and the projects therein are facilitated by Pitzer’s Native American Program Coordinator, Scott Edward Orellana Ingles Scoggins.

Native American Program Coordinator

My name is Scott Edward Orellaña Ingles Scoggins and I am proud to be of Pipil Nahuat, Pocoman Maya, and Scottish ancestry. I am a Native of Los Angeles and was born into a family that was deeply invested in various political and social movements in El Salvador and the United States. This background instilled in me an internal drive, desire, and sense of duty to work towards social justice for all. I implement multicultural education programs that challenge, inspire, support, and motivate young people to pursue higher education. At the same time, I strive to educate non-Native communities on traditional cultures and protocol, as well.

My current work at the Claremont Colleges connects Native American youth to higher education opportunities that will enable them to take on leadership roles within their tribal communities. My personal motto, “Tradition for Life - Education For Our Future” cuts to the core of my belief in a dual focus on traditional learning and academic preparation for success in both local and global networks. My comprehensive programs are designed to support students and community members on intellectual, physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual levels.

Native American Student Coordinator

Nicolás Romo is an undergraduate in his second year at Pitzer College. He plans to double major in Political Studies and Sociology. Nicolás is also the son of indigenous educators who have instilled him with his affinity for treating all people and cultures with dignity. He was involved in a research project on Decolonizing American Universities, which took him to British Columbia this past summer.  He is an avid basketball fan, plays guitar and has an interest in music and pop culture. He also enjoys the campus life and surrounding spaces but Los Angeles will always be home. Nicolás will be coordinating events such as Elders in Residence and Pitzer’s Native Pipeline to College program just to name a few.

Elders in Residence Program
The Elders-in-Residence Program 2012-2013 is in its 3rd year of successfully providing Pitzer students with access to Native Elders and their knowledge. The core programming of the Elders-in-Residence program is to bring Native Elders to Pitzer’s campus where they share their knowledge and experiences with the Pitzer students in an intimate setting. Past examples of Elders-in-Residence programming include Soapstone Carving and Stories with Julia Bogany, Native Regalia with Sarita McGowan, and Ceremony with Chief Tony Cerda.

Volunteering at Sherman Indian High School
Sherman Indian High School is a historic boarding school for Native youth from around the country. Many students go to Sherman to interact with the kids, who lack after school activities outside of their regularly planned classes. Pitzer students have taught varied classes such as Soccer, Knitting, Writing Skills, and Spanish, among others.

Pitzer’s Native American Summer Pipeline to College
Pitzer’s Native American Summer Pipeline to College (Pipeline Program) is a two-week, co-ed, on-campus college life experience for Native students entering 9th-12th grades, hosted on the Pitzer College campus in Claremont, CA, in association with Western University of Health Sciences. It is designed to motivate students to complete high school, promote leadership, and strengthen their self-esteem and academic preparation for college along with their connection to traditional knowledge and culture. The curriculum includes academic and creative writing, computer literacy, self-expression through multidisciplinary arts workshops, and the newest addition – introduction to Health Sciences and Native American Community Wellness.

Other Internship Opportunities Include:

Drum Circle and Sweat Lodge with the Costanoan Rumsen Carmel Tribe of Ohlone Indians
Gardening at Chaffey Communities Cultural Center Tongva Living Garden
MLK Day of Service
Working With Tongva Elder Julia Bogany
Shadowing a Doctor at the Clinica Medica San Miguel
American Indian Health Career Ladder Sessions
Indigenous Film Festival?

More Volunteer and Internship Opportunities can be found in a booklet in the CEC Office.

Elders In Residence

McConnell Living room (1 PM - 2:30 PM)

The Community Engagement Center at Pitzer College with the generous support of the California Campus Compact is pleased to present the Elders In Residence program. Modeled after a similar program at the University of Victoria, Office of Indigenous Affairs, this program allows students, faculty, staff, and community members to meet face to face with Native American Elders. Light refreshment will be served.  For more information please contact scott_scoggins@pitzer.edu.

Timetable:

September 23

Julia Bogany, is a member of the Tongva Nation/ Gabrielino Band of Mission Indians and is their cultural affairs consultant. She has been a teacher, director, and activist for over thirty years fighting for equal rights for all Native Americans.  Julia also consults with and trains school boards on how to revise their curricula to reflect the correct history of California tribes. She has served on several committees and organizations including: the American Indian Children’s Council; the Chaffey College President’s Equity Council; the Pomona Board of Education; the Riverside Municipal Museum Multicultural Board. Julia is the Vice-President of the Keepers of Indigenous Ways, a non-profit group with the mission of bringing people together to develop and implement programs and activities relating to indigenous ancestral lands and maritime cultures. One notable program includes the building, repairing and maintenance of traditional Tongva plank canoes. Julia likes to remind people that she is the mother of four, grandmother of twelve, and great-grandmother of four.

October 7,

Cindi Moar Alvitre, (Tongva) is a mother and grandmother and has been a educator and activist for over three decades. She is descendant from the Tongva, the original inhabitants of Los Angeles & Orange Counties, and the four Southern Channel Islands, and served as the first woman chair of the Gabrieleno/Tongva Tribal Council. In 1985, she & Lorene Sisquoc co-founded Mother Earth Clan, a collective of Indian women who created a model for cultural and environmental education. In the late 1980s, she co-founded Ti’at Society sharing in the renewal of the maritime culture of the Tongva. Cindi is currently a PhD candidate at UCLA, Department of World Arts and Culture and a lecturer at California State University Long Beach in the American Indian Studies and Anthropology. Her specialties aretraditional medicine, cultural identity, revitalization, and cultural trauma.  Cindi is a Task Force member for the State of California, California Indian Heritage Center, and alumni Board Member for California Council for the Humanities. As a social-political activist she has represented her community domestically and internationally including opening for Nobel Laureates, Rigoberta Menchu Tum and His Holiness the Dalai Lama. She is one of the original plaintiffs in Puvungna caseduring the two year occupation of this sacred site. She continues to dedicate her life to the preservation and protection ofCalifornia Indian culture.

October 21

Tata Mario Zapien was born in the small town of Artiaga in the Mexican state of Michoacán. At the age of seventeen he was introduced into the Indigenous ceremonial ways of the Purepecha people of the highlands of Michoacán. He worked for decades in the remote mountain villages throughout Mexico before coming to the United States. Here, he trained in the ceremonial ways of the Purepecha, Huicholes, Tarahumaras, Lacandones and Cardenches (to name only a few). He considers it his life’s work now to preserve the Indigenous ceremonial cultures of Mexico. Zapien studied theater in Morelia and Mexico City and later, when he came to the U.S, he studied with Jaime Jaimes. He became an accomplished actor, poet, playwright and, eventually, founder and artistic director of two theater companies, Teatro Tatalejos (based in Los Angeles) and Teatro Meshico (based in Phoenix, Arizona). His work in the Indigenous traditions continues through his theater work. Under his instruction, participants in his theater companies undergo rigorous ceremonial training. He directs members of the groups to work with the elements of nature, and to serve their communities. For the last eight years, he has guided nine day processions at Placita Olvera in Los Angeles to mark the Day of the Dead, or Dia de los Muertos. Mario likes to remind people that "La cultura es la identidad". Over the years, his theater companies have also performed a large repertoire of plays that deal with social issues of Chicana/o and Latina/o audiences who are removed from their culture, traditions and customs living in the United States.

November 4

Saginaw Grant, a respected member of the Sac & Fox, Iowa & Otoe Missouria Nation was born to Austin & Sarah Grant at Pawnee Indian Hospital in Pawnee, Oklahoma and is an enrolled member of the Sauk & Fox Tribe.He was raised on a farm in Cushing, Oklahoma along with two brothers and one sister. Having a traditional upbringing by both parents, Saginaw was especially influenced by his grandparents. His grandfather named (Kirvin) was a strong Medicine Man and his other grandfather named (Saginaw) whom he was named after was also a very spiritual man. Saginaw was taught their customs, culture and tradition and the importance of the Native people's way of life. As a result, Saginaw witnessed many special ceremonies and events that were taught to only the very few. Saginaw explained that while growing up, his family gave him the spiritual guidance that he needed as a child and as a result, he had a great childhood. "I have always embraced my spirituality and traditions," explains Saginaw and it is this kind of tradition that he has also instilled to his own children and grandchildren. He has become an important role model and mentorfor many of the young people who has met him. A graduate of Bacon Indian College in Oklahoma, Saginaw also served in the United States Marine Corp. As a young adult Saginaw has experienced all of the situations in life (both good and bad) that every young person faces in today's society. Yet he was able to overcome the obstacles that had challenged him and along with that he took his courage to become the man he is today. During his early life in Oklahoma, Saginaw took on a variety of jobs from various types of industries from the dry cleaning business to the Bureau Of Indian Affairs and other vocations. He has always enjoyed interacting with people. This gave him the opportunity to learn about the different philosophies, beliefs and religions of other cultures. He states, "I have gained a better understanding of other people's cultures and religion as I was able to also learn something good from all of them”. "This taught Saginaw to always keep an open mind, which helped him gain respect and a better understanding of people. Saginaw continues his acting career in television, stage and films. He is also called upon for spiritual counseling, lectures, book signing and to speak at special events. He has travelled around the world and was also the Delegate to the United Nations Conference On Human Rights sponsored by Germany. He has worked with other famous celebrities to include: Sir Anthony Hopkins, Tantoo Cardinal, Wes Studi, Sheila Tousey, Dean Cain, and Lindsay Wagner just to name a few. His acting career has proven that his goals are endless. He also participates in many Native Gatherings/Pow Wows throughout southern California as well as throughout the US where he is often requested to be part of their head-staff. Saginawis married and resides in southern California with his wife. He was two grown children; a son and daughter as well as grandchildren and great grandchildren. He enjoys the outdoors, watching his favorite sports on television and attending the many Indian pow wows in the area.

November 18

TBA

December 2

Julia Bogany, is a member of the Tongva Nation/ Gabrielino Band of Mission Indians and is their cultural affairs consultant. She has been a teacher, director, and activist for over thirty years fighting for equal rights for all Native Americans.  Julia also consults with and trains school boards on how to revise their curricula to reflect the correct history of California tribes. She has served on several committees and organizations including: the American Indian Children’s Council; the Chaffey College President’s Equity Council; the Pomona Board of Education; the Riverside Municipal Museum Multicultural Board. Julia is the Vice-President of the Keepers of Indigenous Ways, a non-profit group with the mission of bringing people together to develop and implement programs and activities relating to indigenous ancestral lands and maritime cultures. One notable program includes the building, repairing and maintenance of traditional Tongva plank canoes. Julia likes to remind people that she is the mother of four, grandmother of twelve, and great-grandmother of four.

Women’s Talking Circle

Facilitated by Tongva Elder Julia Bogany. The “women’s talking circle” is meant to offer support, empowerment and build unity among all women who participate.  The circle meets in various locations and is open to all women regardless of ancestry. For more information please contact scott_scoggins@pitzer.edu.

Timetable:

Sherman Indian School

San Manuel Reservation

Cooper Museum and the Chaffey Cultural Center

The Community Engagement Center at Pitzer College with the generous support of California Campus Compact is proud to announce its most recent partnership with Tongva Elder Barbara Drake at the Cooper Museum/Chaffey Cultural Center in the city of Upland. Students will have the unique opportunity of working closely with Barbara Drake on a variety of projects ranging from the creation of the new “Living History Garden” to becoming a docent for the “Tongva Nichols Gallery” and the construction of a “Tongva Village” just to name a few.  For more information please contact Nicholas_Romo14@pitzer.edu or scott_scoggins@pitzer.edu.

Cooper Museum Location

217 East A Street, Upland (Hours Thursday-Saturday 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.)

The Tongva Nichols Gallery – Docent opportunities

Skills: Public Specking

Educational Opportunity: Native American History & Heritage

Time: To be arranged with youth & other tour schedule

Docents will learn about the Tongva Indians and the items on display at the Cooper museum.  Docents will present Tongva Indians history and the items on display with tour groups visiting the Cooper museum.

Collections: Pictures - Clerical opportunities

Skills: clerical & computer

Educational Opportunity: Local & American history

Time: To be arranged

Work on a project to finalize the catalog reorganization of pictures in the museums’ collection.  Matchup labels to the original pictures. Enter picture data into the museum database. Scan pictures for database if not previously scanned.

Collections: Artifacts - Clerical opportunities

Skills: clerical & computer, photography

Educational Opportunity: Local & American history

Time: To be arranged

Work on a project to finalize the catalog reorganization of artifacts in the museums’ collection.  Take pictures of artifacts.  Matchup labels to the artifacts. Enter artifact data into the museum database.  Load pictures into database.

Miniature Tongva Village - Construction opportunities

Skills: Creative, art, construction & minor labor

Educational Opportunity: Native American History & Heritage

Museum display & presentation

Time: To be arranged

Mural & general painting

Miniature village creation and assembly

Setup and minor maintenance of plants (eatable & non-eatable) for the display.

 

Chaffey Community Cultural Center Location

525 West 18th Street, Upland (Hours TBD)

Collections: Pictures - Clerical opportunities

Skills: clerical & computer

Educational Opportunity: Local & American history

Time: To be arranged

Work on a project to finalize the catalog reorganization of pictures in the museums’ collection.  Matchup labels to the original pictures. Enter picture data into the museum database. Scan pictures for database if not previously scanned.

Collections: Artifacts - Clerical opportunities

Skills: clerical & computer, photography

Educational Opportunity: Local & American history

Time: To be arranged

Work on a project to finalize the catalog reorganization of artifacts in the museums’

collection. Take pictures of artifacts.  Matchup labels to the artifacts. Enter artifact

data into the museum database.  Load pictures into database.

Living History Gardens - Basic labor opportunities

Skills: gardening & landscaping, creative

Educational Opportunity: Native American history & Local, American History

Time: To be arranged

Assist with the creation of gardens that accurately depicts the rich local history from the time of the Tongva, Spanish, and American Culture. Research opportunities regarding local historic plants will be required

Pitzer College Native American Open House

In collaboration with Pitzer College, Offices of Education of Tribal Nations, and the generous support of the California Campus Compact Pitzer College will hold several Native American Open House events for Native American high school students and tribal members during the semester. The day includes a tour of the campus and gives students a chance to connect with local tribal elders. Students may talk to admissions counselors, inquire about financial aid, interact with current students, and audit a class. For more information please contact Nicholas_Romo14@pitzer.edu or scott_scoggins@pitzer.edu.

 Timetable: Fall 2011

Wednesday, September 28

Torres Martinez Desert Cahuilla Indians 

Wednesday, October 26

Inter-Tribal Educational Collaborative

Pitzer Pipeline to College Prep

Broad Performance Center (6:00 PM - 8:00 PM)

The Community Engagement Center at Pitzer College with the support of California Campus Compact is proud host Pitzer’s Native Pipeline to College Prep. The group meets every other Thursday and is meant to support Native American high school students with writing college essays, SAT’s preparation, and filling out FAFSA’s. Students interested will also be able to attend cultural events, meet and converse with Native American Elders, attend off campus seminars, and workshops on a variety of subjects.  For more information please contact Nicholas_Romo14@pitzer.edu or scott_scoggins@pitzer.edu.

Timetable:

October 6

College Essay writing 

October 20

Filling out FAFSA applications

November 3

SAT preparations

November 17

Picking a Career