Baby Lab

The Claremont Infant Study Center (Baby Lab)

Claremont Infant Study Center
Pitzer College
1050 N. Mills Avenue
Claremont, CA 91711
909-607-4236

Questions? Email us at babylab@pitzer.edu

The Claremont Infant Study Center conducts ongoing research to study and explore the ways babies from birth to 9 months of age perceive and learn from the world around them.

The center is directed by Dr. David Moore. Dr. Moore earned his Ph.D. at Harvard University and has studied infant development for eighteen years. He is currently professor of Psychology at Pitzer College. To read more about Dr. Moore, see his faculty profile.

We are currently seeking babies between the ages of 2 and 5 months to help us with our research. If you are an interested parent, you can call us, email us, or fill out our online form to let us know you are interested.

Participating in a Study

Participation in a study means a visit to our lab on the campus of Pitzer College in Claremont. Each study is unique, but a typical study involves your baby sitting on your lap while computer-generated sounds and video are presented. The 15-minute sessions are non-invasive, non-stressful, and interesting for both babies and parents.

To make your visits at Pitzer as convenient as possible, we provide sibling-sitting services. A cheerful babysitter in a room stocked with toys keeps older siblings occupied. We also offer free parking and stroller access.

For directions to Pitzer College, please click here.

Publications

These reprints of publications are available in pdf format. If you do not have Acrobat Reader, it may be downloaded for free from Adobe.

Categorization of Infant-Directed Speech: Development From 4 to 6 Months

Perception Precedes Computation: Can Familiarity Preferences Explain Apparent Calculation by Human Babies?

Six-Month-Olds' Categorization of Natural Infant-Directed Utterances

Infants' Visual Preferences in the Presence and Absence of Auditory Stimulation

Effect of Auditory Numerical Information on Infants' Looking Behavior: Contradictory Evidence