Arboretum

Chaparral

Chaparral is a shrubland plant community found primarily in the U.S. state of California and in the northern portion of Lower California, Mexico. It is shaped by a Mediterranean climate (mild, wet winters and hot dry summers) and wildfire. A typical chaparral plant community consists of densely-growing evergreen scrub oaks and other drought-resistant shrubs.


Common Name: California Fushsia
Latin Name: Zauschneria Californica
Native Habitat: Dry slopes below 2,000 ft. from Baja California to Monterey County, California
Soil: Dry, decomposed granite, sand, clay loam, low organic content, well drained
Water: None to one ounce a month
Light: Sun or shade
Height X Width: Max: 18“ x 4 feet. Usual : 1 foot x 4 feet
Leaves or stems: Gre-green, finely textured, dormant in winter

California Fushsia is used for erosion control and flowers are used by hummingbirds and butterflies.


Common Name: California Sagebrush
Latin Name: Artimisia Californica
Native Habitat: Coastal scrub, chaparral and dry foothills below 2,500 feet in dryer parts of central and southern California and Baja California
Soil: Dry, decomposed granite, sand, clay loam, low organic content, well drained
Water: None to twice a month
Light: Sun or shade
Height X Width: Max: 5 feet x 5 feet . Usual 3 feet x 3 feet
Leaves or Stems: Evergreen, silver, aromatic

The fruits are eaten by birds and it is a larval plant for butterflies. The blue-green lacy foliage is useful for indigestion and stomach cramps. It can also be used as a scent in a sauna.


Common Name: Red Yucca
Latin Name: Hesperaloe parviflora
Native Habitat: Limestone hills, arroyos and mesquite thickets in Chihuahuan Desert, infrequent to rare in the wild
Soil: Moist to dry, decomposed granite, sand, clay loam, limestone, low to high organic content, well drained
Water: None to once a week
Light: Sun to partial shade
Height X Width: 2ft. X 3ft.
Leave or Stems: Evergreen

The flowers are used by hummingbirds. Red Yucca starts to bloom in mid-spring.


Common Name: Cleveland Sage
Latin Name: Salvia Clevelandii
Native Habitat: Chaparral, coastal sagescrub in mountains mostly below 3,000 feet from San Diego County to Baja California
Soil: Dry, decomposed granite, sand, low organic content, well drained
Water: None to once a month
Light: Sun or shade
Height X Width: Max: 5 feet x 6 feet. Usual 3 feet x 4 feet
Leaves or Stems: Silver, aromatic, fuzzy, evergreen or dormant in late summer

The leaves can be used to make herbal teas. Hummingbirds use the flowers. Sages are known for their fragrance. The rich violet-blue flowers account for its popularity.


Common Name: Bigberry Manzanita
Latin Name: Arctostaphylos Glauca
Related species: Refugio Manzanita
Native Habitat: Dry slopes, chaparral below 4,700 feet from Contra Costa County to desert mountains to Baja California
Soil: Dry, decomposed granite, sand, sandstone, low organic content, well drained
Water: None to once a month, drip irrigation
Light: Sun to partial shade
Height X Width: Max: 25 ft. x 20 ft.
Leaves or stems: Evergreen, pale blue, smooth or velvety

Blue Manzanita is the most common southern California Manzanita.


Common Name: Wild Lilac Hybrid
Latin Name: Ceanothus ‘Concha’
Native Habitat: Chaparral and coastal bluffs below 1,500 feet. Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo Counties California
Soil: Dry, sand, low organic content, well drained
Water: None to once a month
Light: Sun or shade
Height X Width: Max: 10 feet x 8 feet
Leaves or stems: Evergreen, dark green, small and round

Flowers heavily beginning in late winter and produces clusters of luminous cobalt blue flowers. Flowers are used by butterflies and honey plant for bees.