Senior IMS majors share their projects at the Senior Seminar Media Studies Digital Presendations, December 2009

Senior IMS majors share their projects at the Senior Seminar Media Studies Digital Presendations, December 2009.

Intercollegiate Media Studies Major

Media Studies is an intercollegiate major offered jointly by Claremont McKenna, Harvey Mudd, Pitzer, Pomona and Scripps Colleges. The major requires the completion of 11 courses, with a concentration in Film/Video, Digital/Electronic Media, or Critical Studies.

All Media Studies majors will complete the following courses.

Courses listed as fulfilling each requirement are subject to change, and other courses may be counted toward those requirements with the consent of the IMS curriculum committee.

1. One introductory critical/theoretical course

MS 49 PZ, PO, SC: Introduction to Media Studies

Presents a comprehensive view of the issues important to media studies, including the development of new technologies, visual literacy, ideological analysis, and the construction of content. Students read theory, history and fiction; view films and television programs; and write research and opinion papers. Course is taught at least once a semester on at least one of three campuses. Instructor: Staff [Introductory]

MS 50 HM, PZ, PO or LIT 130 CM: Intro to Film

This course is taught at least once a semester on one or more of four campuses. Intro to Film is an introductory film course that considers the formal elements of cinema as well as the history of film beginning in 1895. This course serves as a prerequisite for production courses and some film history courses. Instructor: staff. [Introductory]

MS 51 PO: Introduction to Digital Media Studies

An interdisciplinary introduction to digital and electronic media, exploring the relationships between "old" and "new" media forms, the historical development of computer-based communication and the ways that new technologies are reshaping literature, art, journalism and the social world. Instructor: K. Fitzpatrick [Introductory]

2. One introductory production course

ART 20 PO: Photography I

A basic photographic course emphasizing all aspects of black and white film exposure, development, and printing. Classes develop technical and conceptual expertise, knowledge of historic and contemporary directions in the field, and an ability to make extended, personal statements in the medium. Equipment needed: camera; tripod useful but optional. Instructor: Staff [Production]

ART 21 PO: Foundations of 2D Design

Introduction to creative and conceptual strategies for artists working in the area of digital art. Readings and lectures provide a historical, technical and conceptual framework, while studio practice introduces computer- and network-based methods of art production. Formerly taught as Digital Art I. Instructor: M. Allen [Production]

ART 141 SC: Introduction to Digital Imaging

This course is designed to develop a sense of computer literacy using the Macintosh system and to acquaint students with the most current state-of-the-art programs in graphics software. Critical discourse is a key element to the structure of the course in examining some of the principles of visual literacy that are encountered in photography, video, animation, and the Internet. Laboratory fee: $75. Offered annually. Instructor: N. Macko [Production]

ART 145 SC: Beginning Photography

A lecture and laboratory course in black-and-white photographic principles with an emphasis on visual content, aesthetic concepts, and creative seeing. Instruction in basic camera and darkroom technique and in the history of the photographic medium. Instructor: J. Orser [Students need to have constant access to a 35mm camera. Lab Fee: $75. Production]

ART 148 SC: Intro to Video Art

A studio course introducing students to the basic techniques of digital video production: camerawork and non-linear editing. Production is augmented by critiques, screenings, and discussions of conceptual and formal ideas. This class has a required lab. Students in this course must also register for MS 82L PZ. Instructor: T. Tran or Staff [Fee: $75. Prereq: MS 49, 50, 51 or equivalent. Non-Scripps students need instructor permission. Production]

MS 82 PZ: Intro to Video Art

This workshop is an introduction to all aspects of digital video production—camera, lights, tripods, sound and non-linear editing. Hands-on assignments will be organized around the formal properties and power of video. The workshop will allow students to evaluate each other’s work as well as that produced by media professionals and to create a final video of their own. This class has a required lab. Students in this course must also register for MS 82L PZ. Instructors: A. Juhasz, M. Ma, S. Hutin, R. Talmor [Prereq: MS 49, 50, 51 or equivalent. Enrollment is limited. Fee: $150. Production]

MS 182 HM: Intro to Video Art

Students learn how to make their own videos, using professional video cameras and editing systems. Weekly, hands-on workshops will cover the entire production process—storyboarding, shooting, lighting, recording sound and editing in Final Cut Pro. Students will complete several group exercises and individual projects, and participate in critiques of professional media and each other's work. Video is explored as a medium for expression, persuasion, humor, storytelling and art-making. This class has a required lab. Students in this course must also register for one section of MS 182L HM. Instructor: R. Mayeri [Prereq: MS 49, 50, 51 or equivalent. Production]

3. One course in media history

LIT 131 CM: Film History I (1925-1965)

This course surveys the history of cinema as art and mass medium, from the introduction of sound to the rise of the “New Hollywood.” Topics such as cinematic response to World War II, the decline of the studio system, and “new waves” of European filmmaking are studied in social, cultural and aesthetic perspectives. Offered every other year. Instructor: J. Morrison [Media History]

LIT 132 CM: Film History II (1965-Present)

This course surveys the history of cinema as art and mass medium, from 1965 to the present. Topics such as the rise of independent filmmaking in America, the conglomeration of the studios, and European resistance to Hollywood’s domination on the world market are considered in social, cultural, and aesthetic terms. Offered every other year. Instructor: J. Morrison [Media History]

LIT 134 CM: Special Studies in Film

A seminar designed to explore the aesthetic achievement and social impact of film as an art form. Subjects for study include such topics as specific film genres, the work of individual film-makers, and recurring themes in film. Each year the seminar concentrates on a different area-for example, “Film and Politics,” “The Director as Author,” or “Violence and the Hero in American Films.” Offered every other year. Topic for Spring 2013: The Spy Film. Instructor: J. Morrison, R. von Hallberg [Media History]

LIT 137 CM: Gay and Lesbian Cinema in the U.S.

This is a survey of gay and lesbian cinema in the U.S. from the early 20th century to the present. The course examines depictions of gay/lesbian themes in Classical Hollywood cinema of the 20s-60s, as well as more recent examples including Sylvia Scarlett, Tea and Sympathy, The Children's Hour, The Killing of Sister George, Poison, Swoon, Watermelon Woman, and Brokeback Mountain. Instructor: J. Morrison [Media History/Theory]

MS 42 PZ: Transnational Crime Cinema

This course examines the ways in which crime and criminality have been represented in narrative cinema across cultures and nationalities. On the one hand, we will look at how “crime” and “the law” are construed, how violence is depicted, how criminals and the police are portrayed, and how “justice” is imagined in different national cinemas during different periods. On the other hand, we will look films that deal with specifically “transnational crimes” that involve border-crossing, including drug trafficking, human trafficking, and illegal immigration. We will also be putting these films in dialogue with readings about nationalism, transnationalism, globalization, and legal systems in different parts of the world. Moreover, questions of urban space, gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, community, and identity will be central to our discussions. The goal of the course is, through the examination of a wide range of films, to shed insight on what constitutes a “crime” and a “criminal” and, therefore, “justice” and “injustice” in our contemporary transnational, globalized society. Instructor: J. Baron [Media History]

MS 45 PZ: Documentary Media

This course involves production, a historical survey of documentary practices in photography, film and video, and a discussion of the ethical and ideological issues raised by the genre. Students will be expected to produce two short documentary projects in any media. Instructor: J. Lerner, R. Talmor [Media History/Intermediate Production]

MS 48 PZ: Media Ethnography/Autobiography

This integrated production/theory course will survey the rich traditions of autobiographical and ethnographic media production while also reading theories and histories of these practices to consider the diverse ethics, strategies, contradictions, and motives of using a camera for knowledge of self and other. Students will produce media ethnographies and autobiographies, as well as written analyses of these practices. Course fee: $150. Instructor: A. Juhasz [Prereq: MS 82. Theory or Intermediate/Advanced Production; G/U]

PZ MS 53: Science Fiction Film

One of the main icons of the science fiction film is the alien, an extraterrestrial visitor - friendly or hostile - who is markedly different from the human population.  That difference takes on various manifestations (sometimes even through similarity!), and in this class we will examine the ways the figure of the alien represents socially and politically charged differences related to racial and gender identity.  We will gain an understanding not only of the various ways the alien functions in science fiction texts, but also how we can read representations of the alien in light of different historical contexts.  We will examine science fiction texts from both film and television and engage the work of scholars in media studies, gender studies, and Critical Race Theory, attempting to answer this question: how does the figure of the alien in science fiction help us understand representations of difference in visual media and experiences of difference in society? Instructor: J. Subramanian [Media History]

MS 55 PZ: Shooting the Truth: The Rise of Political Documentary

This course will explore the evolution of the documentary genre with a particular emphasis on political films. From the simple ethnographic beginnings, to the complex creative expression of political truths that we see today, we will research the historical conditions and events that gave rise to some of the most influential American political films. The styles, ethics, choices and techniques employed by important filmmakers will be explored. Instructor: V. Mudd [Media History]

MS 61 PZ: Pan-American Vanguards

An introduction to a range of modernist vanguard movements from 20th century South, Central and North America, this course surveys the literary, cinematic and fine arts production of these groups. Emphasis is placed on the close analysis of primary texts and comparative studies across genres, media and national boundaries. Instructor: J. Lerner. [Media History]

MS 79 PZ: Silent Film

How does the invention of cinema fit within the emerging order of modernism? This class will examine early cinema in the context of the turn-of-the-century project of extending the field of human vision, examining topics such as ethnography, science, journalism, travel, representations of the city and architecture, and the construction of racial difference. Instructor: J. Lerner [Prereq: MS 49, 50, 51 or equivalent. Media History]

MS 83 PZ: Contemporary Practices in Media

Contemporary Practices in Media is a class developed around visiting media artists’ presentations through the Pitzer Cinematheque Series and field trips to media exhibits in Los Angeles. Students will be provided with related readings in order to shape and lead discussions on how these artists and exhibitions relate to larger media studies histories. Instructor: Staff [Media History]

MS 86 PZ: History of Ethnographic Film

This course offers a historical survey of ethnographic film, beginning in the silent era with the early efforts of Robert Flaherty and with Curtis, and continuing to recent works by Manthia Diawara, Marlon Fuentes and Trinh T. Minh-ha. Instructor: J. Lerner [Media History]

MS 88 PZ: Mexican Visual Cultures

A survey of both popular and elite visual arts in Mexico from the time of Independence to today, including painting, prints, murals, sculpture and, more recently, film and video. Emphasis will be placed on the interchanges between media and the understanding of visual culture as a reflection of social changes. Instructor: J. Lerner [Media History]

MS 89 PZ: Mexican Film History

This survey of the evolution of Mexican media extends from the first Edison to contemporary video art. Special attention will be paid to the avant-garde and other marginalized cinemas in relation to other art forms, experimental filmmakers from other countries working in Mexico and the Mexican film industry. Instructor: J. Lerner [Media History]

MS 91 PZ: History of American Broadcasting

Studies the history of American broadcasting from the diffusion of radio as a mass media through the transition to television, up to the development of television as the dominant broadcasting form. Students will begin to understand the impact of U.S. broadcasting by familiarizing themselves with key programs and trends. Instructor: T. MacLean [Media History]

MS 91 PO: History of American Broadcasting

Studies the history of American broadcasting from the diffusion of radio as a mass media through the transition to television, up to the development of television as the dominant broadcasting form. Students will begin to understand the impact of U.S. broadcasting by familiarizing themselves with key programs and trends. Instructor: M. Shurkus [Media History]

MS 94 PO: Transnational Asian Cinema

Introduces the cinemas of Asia. May include cinemas of East Asia, South Asian and/or the Middle East. Film and video are considered in political, social, and theoretical contexts. Instructor: J. Hall [Media History]

MS 100 PZ: Asian Americans in Media

This is an historical survey of Asian American involvement in media production, beginning with the Silent Film Era and ending with contemporary projects in film, video, and new media. In this course, we will focus on the shifting yet continuous participation of Asians in the production of media in North America, and look at how changing political, social, and cultural discourses have shaped media representations of Asians throughout this period. Instructor: M. Ma [Prereq: MS 49, 50, 51 or equivalent, or PI AA 90 or PI AA 101 or CMC HIST 125. Media History]

MS 111 PZ: Perspectives on Photography

This course critically examines the photograph as artifact, art, evidence, and weapon. Section 1 looks at photographs through the works of key theorists. Section 2 introduces the anthropology of photography as a social practice, including its relation to colonialism, race, and the global circulation of representations. Section 3 hones in on African photography. Section 4 analyzes current trends, including the role of the photograph in journalism, art, indigenous activism, and the digital era. Instructor: R. Talmor [Prereq: one previous Media Studies or Anthropology course. Media History]

MS 116 PZ: Screen Culture

Our world has become increasingly screen-dependent. This course will examine screen culture in a multitude of formats, from movie screen to mobile phones and everything in between.  It is particularly focused on the relationship of technological development to evolving modes of spectatorship in a historical and theoretical context. Instructor: E. Affuso [Prereq: one intro media studies course such as MS 49, 50, or 51. Media History]

MS 118 PZ: Visual Culture & Politics in the African Diaspora

The world has been interconnected for centuries. A great way to see this is through visual culture as a sphere of political action and critique. Centering Africa and the African diaspora, we look at art, film and other forms that comment upon identity, experience, intercultural contact, and the politics of representation. Instructor: R. Talmor [Theory/Media History]

MS 135 PZ: Learning from YouTube

What can YouTube teach us, and is this how, what, and all we'd like to learn? Over its hundred year history, radical media theorists have looked with utopian zeal to a moment in the media future which turns out to be upon us: a time where access to the production and distribution of media is democratically available outside channels organized by capital. So why is the technology being used primarily to spoof mainstream media forms, and what does this tells us about the media, our society, and political possibility? Instructor: A. Juhasz [Media History]

MS 137 PZ: Media Archives

We will consider the making, saving, sharing, using, and re-purposing of collections of media documents. The camera documents. Once archived, these images and sounds are used as testimony and evidence, to make history. The internet, a meta media archive, holds many traditional archives as well as the new people-made archives-of-ourselves constructed thrugh the networked holdings of blogs, Facebook, YouTube, and the like. Instructor: A. Juhasz [Media History/Theory; G/U]

MS 151 PZ: Television Genres

The course is based on the premise that television has been discussed as a monolithic presence in its cultural setting far more frequently than cinema or literary forms. In response, we will consider how television is made up of distinct modes—some historically sequential, some simultaneous. Key genres that will be discussed include: live drama, mini-series, sitcom, soap opera, sketch comedy, game show, science fiction, variety, news & reality. We will also engage with intermedia studies—developing close and critical readings of how television engages with radio and film in its use of genre. We will draw on theoretical approaches to television as well as close readings of texts. Instructor: T. MacLean [Prereq: MS 49, 50, 51, equivalent or permission from instructor. Media History or Theory; G/U]

MS 152 PO: TV Authorship

This class provides an exploration of key movements in recent television, as represented by the work of prominent creators, with attention to critical and theoretical questions of authorship in the medium. Instructor: K. Fitzpatrick [Media History; G/U]

MS 153 PO: The Original Television Series

The Original Television Series from "The Sopranos" to "Mad Men.". The course examines the original television series, a prominent development in U.S. television and, more broadly, in American culture during the last decade. We discuss representative texts in this genre, among them The Sopranos, The Wire, and Mad Men, and examine the genre's distinctive features. We also look at how television series engage with American culture. Instructor: K. Klioutchkine [Prereq: One of the following: MS 49, 50, 51, or 91. Media History]

MS 160 PO: Japanese Film: Canon to Fringe

Follows the emergence of Japanese filmmaking with attention to key directors: Ozu, Mizoguchi, Kurosawa, Oshima, and others. Surveys the range of Japanese genres from feature filmmaking to documentary and experimental work. Prerequisite: MS 50 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Instructor: J. Hall [Media History]

ENGL 189A SC: American Film: John Ford, Frank Capra, Alfred Hitchcock

Analysis of major works by each director in artistic and historical context. Instructor: J. Peavoy [Media History]

ENGL 189B SC: American Film: Orson Welles, Preston Sturges, Fritz Lang

Analysis of major works by each director in artistic and historical context. (Note: Lang films will be chosen from his American period.) Instructor: J. Peavoy [Media History]

ENGL 189C SC: Fifties Film: Pop Culture and Society

Using American films from the fifties, we will explore the relation between popular culture and the society that produces it. Includes films such as "Some Like it Hot," "Rebel Without a Cause," "Singing in the Rain," and "High Noon." Instructor: J. Peavoy [Media History]

ENGL 189D SC: Genre: The Art Film

In the 50s and 60s, foreign films became a cultural phenomenon in the United States. They were seen as works of art, in contrast to the "products" of the Hollywood "factory." We will study these films in terms of their reception in American culture. Works by Bergman, Fellini, Kurosawa, Buñuel, Godard, Ray, and others. Instructor: J. Peavoy [Media History]

4. One course in media theory

Art 181 SC, Theory Seminar in Studio Art and Media Studies

This upper-division course provides an in-depth look at the history and methodologies underlying contemporary art practices and is intended to provide students with an opportunity to explore, research, and write on visual culture. Connecting contemporary art practice to the wider history of art, topics may include uses of photography in the 19th century, the avantgarde in Europe, Performance Art, Conceptual Art, Minimalism, Installation Art, Pop Art, and contemporary practices. Repeatable for credit with different topics. Staff.

ART 181G SC: From Beauty to the Abject: Race, Whiteness and Modernism

Looking at various aesthetic models, this course will highlight the intersection of modern and contemporary art criticism with issues related to social and cultural constructions of difference as manifested within the visual arts. Topics include modernism, whiteness, race, and the history of lynching in California. Instructor: K. Gonzales-Day [Theory; G/U]

ART 183 SC: Feminist Concepts & Practices in Studio Art and Media Studies

This seminar/studio course examines the recent history and current trends of women's roles and contributions in media studies and studio art through readings and projects with an emphasis on gender in relationship to media culture. Analysis of and experimentation with visual media including print, photography and digital art in relation to the theory and practice of media studies and studio art is informed by a feminist perspective and critique. [Prerequisites: Art 131, Art 141, or Art 145, or permission of instructor. Theory]

ARHI 141A PO: (Re)presenting Africa: Art, History, and Film

The seminar centers on post-colonial African films to examine (re)presentations of the people, arts, cultures and socio-political histories of Africa and its Diaspora. Course critically examines the cinematic themes, aesthetics, styles and schools of African and African Diasporic filmmakers. Offered alternate years. Instructor: P. Jackson [Theory]

ARHI 141B PO: Africana Cinema: Through the Documentary Lens

Course examines documentary films and videos created by filmmakers from Africa and the African Diaspora (United States, Britain and Caribbean). Topics include: history and aesthetics of documentary filmmaking, documentary as art, the narrative documentary, docu-drama, cinema vérité, biography, autobiography and historical documentary. Offered alternate years. Instructor: P. Jackson [Theory/Film Theory]

ARHI 144B PO: (Re)presenting Africa: Art, History, and Film

Examines visual arts and cultural criticism produced by women from Africa and the African Diaspora (North America, Caribbean and Europe). Students analyze aesthetic values, key representational themes, visual conventions, symbolic codes and stylistic approaches created from feminism's spirited love of Blackness, Africaness and justice. Complement to AFRI144A, Black Women Feminism(s) and Social Change. Suggested: previous course in either Africana or Chicano/a or Gender and Women's Studies. Instructor: P. Jackson [Theory]

ARHI 178 PO: Black Aesthetics and the Politics of (Re)presentation

Survey of the visual arts produced by people of African descent in the U.S. from the colonial era to the present. Emphasis on Black artists' changing relationship to African arts and cultures. Examines the emergence of an oppositional aesthetic tradition that interrogates visual constructions of "blackness" and "whiteness," gender and sexuality as a means of revisioning representational practices. Instructor: P. Jackson [Theory]

ARHI 186T PO: Art and Time

Technological developments over the past 200 years have altered relations between art and time. How has moving from painting to lithography, photography, film and digital media influenced the creation of art and its relation to beholders? Considering North America and Europe since 1800, we explore relations between still and moving images, and ask how artists manipulate our experience of time. Alongside mainstream forms, we examine wax museums, natural history dioramas, stereographs, tableaux vivants, and MTV. The seminar constitutes a brief history of making and looking at images. Instructor: A. Reed [Theory/Art History; G/U]

ARHI 186Y PO: WMDs: Cinema Against War, Imperialism, & Corporate Power

Documentary films (weapons for mind decolonization) by human rights advocates offer critical narratives effectively silenced by the blare of commercial mass media and post-9/11 nationalism. This study of visual culture and representational theories is for global villagers eager to raise their historical awareness, deconstruct the rhetoric of power elites, debunk the conceits of imperialism, and dismantle the deceits of transnational corporations. Course promotes active spectatorship, courage as the antidote to fear, and anti-war activism (see: http://costofwar.com/index.html) Instructor: P. Jackson [Theory/Film Theory/Media History]

ENGL 118 PO: Nature of Narrative in Fiction and Film

Investigates narrative as a fundamental mode of understanding and organizing human experience. Practice of storytelling in writers like Calvino, Diderot, Kundera, Borges, Proust, Kafka, Dante, Sterne, Woolf and Sartre; and in filmmakers like Lynch, Hitchcock, Roeg, Mallek and Allen. Theories of narrative from Aristotle through Freud to Barthes. Instructor: A. Reed [Elective]

ENGL 147 PO: Contemporary Critical Theory

Introduction to the tasks and problems of contemporary literary theory. Readings drawn primarily from structuralism and post structuralism. Offered alternate years. Instructor: P. Mann [Media Theory]

LIT 103 HM: Third Cinema

Emerging in Latin America in the 1960s and 1970s, the notion of Third Cinema takes its inspiration from the Cuban revolution and from Brazil’s Cinema Novo. Third Cinema is the art of political film making and represents an alternative cinematic practice to that offered by mainstream film industries. This course explores the esthetics of film making from a revolutionary consciousness in three regions: Africa, Asia and Latin America. Instructor: I. Balseiro [Theory/Film Theory]

LIT 136 CM: American Film Genres

Mainstream genres can be seen as expressions of American culture’s popular mythology. This course will concentrate on selected genres to examine the social values, issues, and tensions that underlie these narratives and their characteristic ways of resolving fundamental societal conflicts. Instructor: J. Morrison [Theory/Film Theory; G/U]

LIT 138 CM: Film & Mass Culture

This course will examine film as art and as medium in the context of the rise of 20th-century “mass culture.” We will take up such topics as the role of film in producing the ideas of “mass culture;” the cinematic representation of the “masses;” film as an instrument of the standardization of culture and as a mode of resistance to it; film and modernism; film and postmodernism; representations of fascism in cinema; and “subculture” considered as an effect of mass culture. Offered every third year. Instructor: J. Morrison [Theory/Film Theory; G/U]

LIT 139 CM: Film Theory

This course investigates the major film theories from the beginnings of cinema to the present. We begin with a study of classical film theory (1900-1960) that attempts to define the essence of the form, its relation to reality, and its status as mass medium and/or art. We then move on to more recent work that examines film from ideological, sociological, or psychological perspectives, or considers the changing nature of cinema in the digital age. Readings include works by Hugo Munsterberg, Vachel Lindsay, Sergei Eisenstein, Lev Kuleshov, Rudolf Arneim, Bela Balasz, Andre Bazin, Christian Metz, Raymond Bellour, Laura Mulvey, Mary Ann Doane, Paul Virilio, Friederich Kittler, D.N. Rodowick, and Nicole Brenez. Instructor: J. Morrison [Theory/Film Theory; G/U]

MS 46 PZ: Feminist Documentary Production and Theory

Women have made politicized documentaries since the invention of the motion picture camera. Students will learn this complex theoretical, historical and political tradition while producing their own feminist documentary. Enrollment is limited. Course fee: $150. Instructor: A. Juhasz [Prereq: MS 49, 50, 51 or equivalent, or MS 82. Theory/Film Theory; G/U]

MS 48 PZ: Media Ethnography/Autobiography

This integrated production/theory course will survey the rich traditions of autobiographical and ethnographic media production while also reading theories and histories of these practices to consider the diverse ethics, strategies, contradictions, and motives of using a camera for knowledge of self and other. Students will produce media ethnographies and autobiographies, as well as written analyses of these practices. Course fee: $150. Instructor: A. Juhasz [Prereq: MS 82. Theory or Intermediate/Advanced Production; G/U]

MS 70 PZ: Media and Social Change

This course presents an overview of movements, theories, and methods employed by media makers committed to social change. From the early Soviet film collectives, through the Third Cinema movement of 60s in Latin America, and continuing on to feminist, queer, and youth video activist movements in the U.S. that have laid the groundwork for the rise of socially driven media collectives and campaigns today. In response readings and film screenings, students will be asked to critique both the ethical means and efficacy of media documents as organizing tools for raising consciousness and critical dialogue. They will also be encouraged to develop their own theories of media as a conduit for social change based on the creation of participatory production projects that strive to incite civic discourse. Instructor: G. Lamb [Media History/Theory]

MS 105 PZ: Transnational Media Theory

This course reviews a wide range of scholarship on national cinema and electronic media practices, as well as how visual media production and consumption connect to developing ideas of nation, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and a public sphere in diasporic and immigrant communities. Instructor: Eve Oishi [Theory]

MS 106 PZ: Power/Knowledge

In this course we examine Michel Foucault's work on modern forms of power and its connection to the production of knowledge.  In "Discipline and Punish," Foucault argues that modern panoptic techniques of surveillance have produced a universal normative gaze that each of us internalizes, and though which we become, as he puts it, "docile bodies."   In his later work he complicates this argument by contending that the confessional operates as a blueprint for the operation of what he calls "bio-power," which, through the scientific "liberation" of bodies, shapes them at both an individual and social level. Instructor: Henry Krips [Theory]

MS 110 PZ: Media & Sexuality

This course is an intermediate/advanced-level course examining the intersections between media theory and the study of sexuality. In exploring issues including transgenderism, pornography, censorship, feminism, queer cinema, and representations of race and sexuality, this course focuses on compelling case studies that provide students with specific understanding of the prevailing debates and defining theories of sexuality within media studies. Please note: Students must be aged 18 and above to enroll in this course. Instructors: A. Juhasz/M-Y. Ma [Prereq: MS 49, 50, 51 or equivalent. Theory; G/U]

MS 112 PZ: Anthropology of Media

Life today is saturated by various kinds of media. In the last two decades, a new field—the ethnography of media—brings anthropology's cross-cultural perspective and attention to everyday reality to studies of media and theorizes media as constituting new spaces of community and self-making in a globalized world. Instructor: R. Talmor [Theory]

MS 113 PZ: African Masculinities in Film

This course explores issues that shape African masculinities as these are expressed in film. Beginning with the premise that masculinities are plural, processual, and dialogic, we will investigate the ways African men enact and experience their masculinity in contexts of colonialism, national liberation, and neoliberalism, in relations between youth and elders, between men and men, between men and women, and between Africans and foreigners. Instructor: R. Talmor [Theory]

MS 114 PZ: Film Sound

An intermediate level media history and theory course exploring how sound functions in cinema. Topics covered by the course include the history of sound technologies, film sound theories, voice in cinema, film music, sound recording and reproduction in film. Instructor: M. Ma [Prereq: MS 49, 50, 51; or some introductory level music theory courses. Theory/Media History, G/U]

MS 118 PZ: Visual Culture & Politics in the African Diaspora

The world has been interconnected for centuries. A great way to see this is through visual culture as a sphere of political action and critique. Centering Africa and the African diaspora, we look at art, film and other forms that comment upon identity, experience, intercultural contact, and the politics of representation. Instructor: R. Talmor [Theory/Media History]

MS 136 PZ: Online Feminist Spaces

This hyper/in/visibility of the feminist in digital spaces is the (non)place, and yet somehow also the very real location, of a course that will consider—by reading, using, and making—the nowhere and everywhere of feminism in on-line, user-generated, social networked spaces of web 2.0. Instructor: A. Juhasz [Theory]

MS 147B PO: Topics in Media Theory: Body, Representation, Desire

A close examination of theories of media analysis, with an emphasis on the visual arts (painting, photography, film, video, installation art, performance art, conceptual art, art museums). Topics change from year to year. Course may be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisite: one media studies or art history course. Topic for Spring 2013: Body, Representation, Desire. Instructor: J. Friedlander [Theory]

MS 147C PO: Topics in Media Theory: Constructing/Dismantling the Body

The body is more than just flesh and blood; it is a social and cultural entity shaped by a variety of factors. This course will investigate some of the many ways in which bodies have been constructed and interpreted in culture, focusing particularly on the bodies in states of flux—diseased, dying, gestating, etc. Instructor: L. Mullens [Theory]

MS 147E PO: Topics in Media Theory: Politics of Representation

This class examines the complex and even contradictory notion of "politics" as it is used to describe the contents, contexts and consequences of mass media.  Drawing on political economy, critical cultural theory, and social movement theory, the course aims to address questions like these: What makes the media powerful?  And who bears the burden of representation?  Students will also create media projects—short films, zines, blogs, etc.— in order to contend with these questions materially from the standpoint of a producer. Instructor: C. Snorton [Theory]

MS 147G PO: Topics in Media Theory: Virtuality & the Body

Traditionally, the notion of the virtual referred to something unreal. Yet, along with the development of digital technologies our understanding of “the actual” and the body’s perceptual capacities has transformed. Drawing on philosophical and cultural theories, we will investigate virtuality and the body’s capacities to apprehend and process virtual information. Instructor: M. Shurkus [Theory]

MS 147H PO: Topics in Media Theory: Reality, Realism, & the Real

In the Humanities, Realism has been criticized for impressing upon audiences the illusion that they are watching real life events unfold spontaneously before their eyes—an illusion which takes on a politically conservative role as a vehicle for the circulation of dominant ideological meanings. In the sciences, by contrast, Realism has attracted far more favorable reviews: for example, Einstein writes that "If one renounces this assumption [of Realism] then I do not see what physics is supposed to describe." In this course we will examine the interplay between these two attitudes to Realism. In particular we will suggest that it is possible to recuperate a politically progressive role for Realism as an aesthetic-representational form. Letter grade only. Instructor: J. Friedlander [Prereq: MS 49, 50 or 51. Theory]

MS 149 PO: Topics in Media Theory 2

A rigorous, focused inquiry into the theorists, schools and movements that have set the terms for analysis of contemporary media, including print media, film, television and the Internet. Topics change from year to year; course may be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor: K. Fitzpatrick, L. Mullens [Theory]

MS 149E PO: Topics in Media Theory: A Brief History of Film Theory

This course traces the theoretical considerations of film from the early 20th century to the present with special attention to the provocative intersection of semiotics, Marxism, and psychoanalysis that defined film theory from the late 1960s through the 1980s. We examine this brief history of film theory alongside the cinema that inspired it and the films it engendered. Prerequisite: MS 50 or equivalent. Instructor: J. Hall [Theory]

MS 149F PO: Topics in Media Theory: Queer Visions, Queer Theory

Examining the creative and critical work of three gay male filmmakers—Pier Paolo Pasolini (1922-1975), Rainer Werner Fassbinder (1945-1982), and Tsai Mingliang (1957–present) —this seminar probes the intersection of avant-garde cinematic practice, sexuality, and queer theory. Semiotic theories of language and image, hyperbolic reformulations of family romance, and a constant critique of left-liberalism are some of the thematics through which we approach these directors. But we also explore how the work of these filmmakers engages feminist film criticism, how new, queer scholarship has attempted to address the dystopic positions often identified within the gay male film text, and how Pasolini, Fassbinder, and Tsai, each in a different manner, refuse subordination to a sexual hermeneutics. Instructor: J. Hall. [Theory or Media History]

MS 149H PO: Topics in Media Theory: Games, Theory, and Narrative Structures

This course provides an introduction to the scholarship that has developed around video games. Our primary focus will be on the various narrative structures games employ, both within the programmed structures of the game and at the level of interface with players. Readings will include contemporary videogame theory and history. Instructor: M. Shurkus [Theory]

MS 149Q PO: Topics in Media Theory: Freud, Film, Fantasy

An in-depth exploration of key texts from psychoanalysis reveals a scandalous relation between desire and representation, namely fantasy. We probe the political life of fantasy and the usefulness of sexuality and the unconscious for conceiving alternative to the hegemony of the normal. Instructor: J. Hall [Theory, G/U]

5. A senior seminar

MS 190 PO, MS 190 PZ, or MS 190 SC (MS 190: Senior Seminar will be taught jointly effective Fall 2007.)

Each student will also complete one of the following six-course concentrations:

Film/Video

6. One intermediate or advanced film/video production class.

7. One additional course in media history, as listed above.

8-11. Four appropriate electives, drawn from the list of all approved courses that follows (note that Pitzer MS majors must select MS 194 PZ, Media Arts for Social Justice, or MS 196 PZ, Media Internship, as one of their electives).

Digital/Electronic Media

6. An intermediate or advanced digital production course.

7. One course in twentieth or twenty-first century art history:

ARHI 181 SC: Art Since 1945

Painting, sculpture, and non-traditional art forms from Abstract Expressionism to the present, with emphasis on American art. Topics include Abstract Expressionism, Pop, Minimalism, Conceptual and Performance Art, Land Art, Site-Specificity and Institutional Critique, feminist art and video. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Instructor: J. Koss [Prereq: one previous art history course. Art History/Elective]

ARHI 184 PO: Modernism, Antimodernism & Postmodernism: A Social History of North American Art

A comparative analysis of artistic production in Canada, the U.S., and Mexico in the 20th and 21st centuries. Examines issues of race, class, and gender and the relationships between artistic theories and practices, economic developments, and social and political movements (e.g. the Mexican Revolution, the Depression, the Women's Movement). Instructor: F. Pohl [Art History]

ARHI 185 PO: History of Photography

Explores evolution of the photographic image in documentary work, portraiture, aesthetic expression, journalism, and advertising from its inception to the present time. Instructor: K. Howe [Art History/Media History]

ARHI 185T PO, Art and Time

8-11. Four appropriate electives, drawn from the list of all approved courses that follows (note that Pitzer MS majors must select MS 194 PZ, Media Arts for Social Justice, or MS 196 PZ, Media Internship, as one of their electives).

Critical Studies

6. One additional media theory course, as listed above. One of the two required media theory courses must be MS 147 PO or MS 149 PO, Topics in Media Theory I or II.

7. One additional course in media history, as listed above.

8-11. Four appropriate electives, drawn from the list of all approved courses that follows (note that Pitzer MS majors must select MS 194 PZ, Media Arts for Social Justice, or MS 196 PZ, Media Internship, as one of their electives).

Critical Studies: Film Studies Option

Students desiring an emphasis in Film Studies should follow the Critical Studies track, tailoring their major by selecting the following courses:

1. MS 50 PZ or LIT 130 CM, Language of Film

2. MS 82 PZ, Introduction to Film and Video Production; ART 148 SC, Introduction to Video; or MS 182s HM, Introduction to Video Production

3. MS 147 PO, Topics in Media Theory I; or MS 149 PO, Topics in Media Theory II

4. One course in film theory such as: LIT 103 HMC, Third Cinema; LIT 138 CMC, Film and Mass Culture; LIT 139 CM, Film Theory; MS 46 PZ, Feminist Documentary Production and Theory; MS 72 PZ, Women and Film; or MS 76 PZ, Gender and Genre; MS 48 PZ, Media Ethnography/Autobiography; MS 74 PZ, Sound Theory, Sound Practice; MS 110 PZ, Media and Sexuality; MS 197 PZ, Media Praxis in Ontario; or ARHI 141B PO, Africana Cinema: Through the Doc Lens

5-6. LIT 131 CM, Film History I (1925-1965) and LIT 132 CM, Film History II (1965-Present)

7. MS 190 PO, Senior Seminar

8-11. Four appropriate film-oriented electives drawn from the list of all approved courses that follows (note that Pitzer MS majors must select MS 194 PZ, Media Arts for Social Justice, or MS 196 PZ, Media Internship, as one of their electives).

Senior Exercise

The senior exercise consists of a topical senior seminar jointly taught during the fall semester by faculty from each of the concentrations. This seminar asks students to bring together the various aspects of their course of study, producing an appropriate culminating seminar project that demonstrates their command of the fields and the forms of critical and creative practice that they have studied. During this seminar, all senior Media Studies majors will be given the option to develop a proposal for a second-semester Senior Project. These proposals will be reviewed by the Media Studies faculty, and selected students will go on to complete an independent project under the supervision of two members of the Media Studies faculty or appropriate affiliated faculty members from the Claremont Colleges. The Senior Project course will count toward the four electives required for the major.

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