Anthropology Courses

1. Introduction to Archaeology and Biological Anthropology. An introduction to the basic concepts, theories, methods and discourses of these fields. The course includes an examination of human evolution as well as a survey of human cultural development from the Stone Age to the rise of urbanism. Each student is required to participate in one lab session per week in addition to the regular lecture meetings. Spring, S. Miller.

2. Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology. An introduction to the basic concepts, theories and methods of social and cultural anthropology. An investigation of the nature of sociocultural systems using ethnographic materials from a wide
range of societies. Fall/Spring, L. Martins; Fall/Spring, A. Shenoda (Scripps).

3. Language, Culture & Society. How speech and writing reflect and create social and cultural differences (and universals). We will consider factors that can lead to miscommunication between speakers with different cultural expectations— including speakers who seem to share the same language but use it very differently, whether language shapes thought, how social ideologies and relations of status and power are reflected in language use and the politics of language use (e.g., who decides that a particular language variety is "standard"). Spring, C. Strauss.

Anth 11/Hist 11. The World Since 1492. This course explores the last 500 years of world history. In examining this large expanse of time, the focus is on four closely related themes: (1) struggles between Europeans and colonized peoples, (2) the global formation of capitalist economies and industrialization, (3) the formation of modern states and (4) the formation of the tastes, disciplines and dispositions of bourgeois society. Fall, C. Johnson/D. Segal.

12. Native Americans and Their Environments. This course will investigate the traditional interrelationships of Native American ethnic groups with their various environments. Are patterns of collecting wild resources or farming primary foods
environmentally determined? How does the physical environment affect a group's social system, politics, art, religion? What impact do these cultural factors have on a group's utilization of its environment? We will examine these and other issues through class discussions and readings. We will consider several regions of North America in our study of such groups as the Inuit, Kwakiutl, Cahuilla, Hopi, Navajo, Dakota and Iroquois. Fall, S. Miller.

16. Introduction to Nepal. The course provides an introduction to the history and cultures of Nepal. Drawing on ethnographic accounts and anthropological framings, the class explores gender, literacy, class, caste, consumption, and recent political changes in contemporary Nepal. This course is appropriate for, but not limited to, students interested in study abroad in Nepal. Fall, E. Chao.

20. Anthropology of Latin America. Latin America is among the most extensively studied regions by anthropologists worldwide. This course surveys some of the main themes in The Anthropology of Latin America, through the close reading of several ethnographies on the region. We will critically examine topics including: gender, sexuality, violence, indigenous rights, difference, and marginality. Fall, A. Shenoda (Scripps).

Clas 20. Fantastic Archaeology: Modern Myths, Pseudo-Science, and the Study of the Past. (See Classics 20). M. Berenfeld.

23. China and Japan Through Film and Ethnography. This course will use feature films as ethnographic sources for exploring the cultures of China and Japan. It will juxtapose the examination of historical and anthropological material with films and recent film criticism. Includes weekly film screenings. Enrollment is limited. E. Chao. [not offered 2011–12]

25. Anthropology of the Middle East. Drawing on a variety of ethnographies, films, and theoretical perspectives, this course simultaneously provides an overview of the Middle East (broadly defined) from an anthropological perspective and a critical exploration of the ways anthropology has contributed to the construction of the Middle East as a region in the first place. L. Deeb (Scripps).

28. Colonial Encounters: ASIA. Drawing on a variety of ethnographies, films, and theoretical perspectives, this course simultaneously provides an overview of the Middle East (broadly defined) from an anthropological perspective and a critical exploration of the ways anthropology has contributed to the construction of the Middle East as a region in the first place. L. Deeb (Scripps).

33. Caribbean Histories, Cultures and Societies. Though known to persons from the United States primarily as sites of recreational tourism ("sun, surf and sex"), the islands of the Caribbean are sites of daily work and life for some 36 million persons. This course examines the cultures, societies and histories of the Caribbean, focusing primarily on the English and French speaking Caribbean. Thematically, the course focuses on processes of racialization, effects of globalization, experiences of labor, the circulation of popular/mass culture and the openness of the Caribbean to travel. Prerequisite: History 11 or permission of instructor. D. Segal. [not offered 2011–12]

41. Social Movements and Other Forms of Political Struggles.The last decades have been marked by a proliferation of social and political movements all over the world. Indians, peasants, mothers, students, among others, have organized collective actions to fight discrimination, poverty, violence, environment degradation, etc. This course will examine the historical context and different forms of the so-called New Social Movements in the context of globalization and latecapitalism. We will read ethnographic accounts of these movements, watch movies made by and about them and analyze the theories that attempt to explain these struggles. L. Martins. [not offered 2011–12]

47. Other People's Beliefs: The Anthropology of Religion. How do we know when we are encountering the religious? And how can it be studied? This course will address these questions and others by examining the major themes in the anthropology of religion: magic, belief, symbols, ritual, morality, spirit possession, conversion, and secularization. Students will learn about a variety of religious practices while critically probing the question of studying other people's beliefs. Spring, Staff (Scripps).

50. Sex, Body, Reproduction. Is there a line between nature and culture? Drawing on historical, ethnographic and popular sources, this course will examine the cultural roots of forms of knowledge about sex, the body and reproduction and the circulation of cultural metaphors in medical, historical and colonial discourse. Spring, E. Chao.

52. Indigenous Societies: Histories of Encounters. The course gives an overview of the current lives of indigenous societies in different parts of the world (North America, South America, Africa, and Asia). We will examine major topics that mark their encounters with nation-states: political power, economic development, gender relations, collective rights, healthy, formal education, and religion. The course compares a variety of ethnographic cases (through movies and texts) to expose the difference and similarities between 'indigenous peoples." Spring, L. Martins.

58. Doing Research Abroad. Designed to prepare students to conduct independent research projects in the Pitzer study abroad programs. This course will assist students in conducting research in unfamiliar or less familiar cultures than their own. We will focus on issues related to the scope of the research, methodology and ethics. The course will also provide a general basis for the encounter and understanding of other societies. Open and relevant to students in all areas. L. Martins. [not offered 2011–12]

62. Embodying the Voice of History. This course will examine various testimonials such as the education of Little Tree, the life of Rigoberta Menchu, Burundian refugee accounts, descriptions of satanic ritual possession and post-revolutionary Chinese narratives known as "speaking bitterness." Do these testimonials unproblematically inform us about the historical contexts they describe? Issues of veracity and authenticity will be examined as well as processes of politicization. E. Chao. [not offered 2011–12]

EA 68. Ethnoecology. (See Environmental Analysis 68). P. Faulstich.

Mus 66. Music Cultures of the World. Fall, C. Jaquez (Scripps).

70. Culture and the Self. This course examines the way emotions, cognition and motivations are shaped by culture. Topics will include ideas of personhood in different societies, cultural differences in child rearing, whether there are any universal emotions or categories of thought and mental illness cross-culturally. C. Strauss. [not offered 2011–12]

76. American Political Discourses. This course will examine individualist discourses and alternatives to them (e.g., populist, religious, ethnic/racial identity, socialist, New Age) in the United States. We will study how these discourses have
been used in the past and present by elites and average citizens, including their key words, metaphors, rhetorical styles and unspoken assumptions. The focus of the class will be original research projects examining the ways these discourses are used in discussions of politics and public policy. C. Strauss. [not offered 2011–12]

Anth 77/Hist 77. Great Revolutions in Human History? The Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions Compared.This course will examine individualist discourses and alternatives to them (e.g., populist, religious, ethnic/racial identity,
socialist, New Age) in the United States. We will study how these discourses have been used in the past and present by elites and average citizens, including their key words, metaphors, rhetorical styles and unspoken assumptions. The focus of the class will be original research projects examining the ways these discourses are used in discussions of politics and public policy. C. Strauss. [not offered 2011–12]

81. Media Discourse. What is the relation between discourse in the media and in everyday life? This course will examine language use in print media, television and movies as ways of portraying fantasies, stereotypes, power and both contested and taken-for-granted cultural assumptions. C. Strauss.

83. Life Stories. We cannot just tell any story about ourselves. This course examines life stories from various societies and time periods, including our own. The focus is on the cultural concepts of self, linguistic resources, and aspects of
autobiographical memory that shape how we represent and imagine our lives. C. Strauss. [not offered 2011–12]

86. Anthropology of Public Policy. Cultural assumptions help determine debates about public policy, as well as what is not even considered a subject for debate. This course will focus on the way past and current cultural assumptions have
shaped policies in the United States and other nations about the environment, abortion, welfare, immigration and other issues. C. Strauss. [not offered 2011–12]

87. Contemporary Issues in Gender and Islam. Cultural assumptions help determine debates about public policy, as well as what is not even considered a subject for debate. This course will focus on the way past and current cultural assumptions have shaped policies in the United States and other nations about the environment, abortion, welfare, immigration and other issues. C. Strauss. [not offered 2011–12]

88. China: Gender, Cosmology and the State. This course examines the anthropological literature on Chinese society. It will draw on ethnographic research conducted in the People's Republic of China. Particular attention will be paid to the genesis of historical and kinship relations, gender, ritual, ethnicity, popular practice and state discourse since the revolution. Spring, E. Chao.

89. The American Sixties. This course will examine the now much mythologized period of American history known as "the sixties." It will inevitably deal with the sordid history of "sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll," as well as histories of revolting youth.
But just as importantly, the course will be driven by three theoretical questions. First, what is the relationship between the political activism of bourgeois youth in the "the sixties" and ritualized processes of social reproduction, experienced as
the transition from "childhood" to "adulthood"? Second, what is the relationship between the leftist politics of "the sixties" and the historical formation of professional managerial classes in U.S. and world history? And third, how do singular events—such as the decade's iconic assassination of President John F. Kennedy—articulate with cultural schemas? Prereq: Anth/Hist 11 or concurrent enrollment in Anth/Hist 11. Fall, D. Segal.

90. Schooling. This course examines the history of mass schooling, the undergraduate curriculum and professional education from the mid-19th through the end of the 20th century. The course is primarily concerned with the relationship
of schooling at all these levels to the state, capitalism and popular belief. The geographic focus will be on the U.S., but comparisons will be made with schooling elsewhere, notably in Caribbean and European societies. Prerequisite: Anth/Hist 21 or permission of instructor. D. Segal. [not offered 2011–12]

95. Folk Arts in Cultural Context. This course will investigate the nature of folk arts, along with the roles of the folk artist in a variety of cultures. We will discuss various media of folk expression such as ceramics, basketry and textiles; many
of these are made by women and gender issues will be central to discussion. The course will consider traditional cultural controls over techniques and designs, as well as the impact of outside influence such as tourist demands for "ethnic" arts. Enrollment is limited. S. Miller. [not offered 2011–12]

97G. Political Anthropology. This course will investigate the nature of folk
arts, along with the roles of the folk artist in a variety of cultures. We will discuss
various media of folk expression such as ceramics, basketry and textiles; many
of these are made by women and gender issues will be central to discussion. The
course will consider traditional cultural controls over techniques and designs, as
well as the impact of outside influence such as tourist demands for "ethnic" arts.
Enrollment is limited. S. Miller. [not offered 2011–12]

99. China in the 21st Century: Gender, Culture, Nation. This course will investigate the nature of folk arts, along with the roles of the folk artist in a variety of cultures. We will discuss various media of folk expression such as ceramics, basketry and textiles; many of these are made by women and gender issues will be central to discussion. The course will consider traditional cultural controls over techniques and designs, as well as the impact of outside influence such as tourist demands for "ethnic" arts. Enrollment is limited. S. Miller. [not offered 2011–12]

101. Theory and Method in Archaeology. This course considers theoretical approaches in archaeology and compares their assumptions, methods and results. Problems of interpreting archaeological data will be discussed. Students will have practical experience with field methods of excavation and laboratory analysis of artifacts. Enrollment is limited. S. Miller. [not offered 2011–12]

102. Museums and Material Culture.Material culture consists of artifacts that represent the behaviors of humans who create, utilize, value and discard things in culturally significant ways. This course will investigate the cultural and individual
meanings of objects from several different groups. A major section of the course will focus on museums: how they present cultural materials (and possibly misrepresent). In required lab section meetings throughout the semester, students will cooperate to design and mount an exhibition of early American material culture. S. Miller. [not offered 2011–12]

103. Museums: Behind the Glass.The focus of this course is on the museum as a cultural institution. In the class we will consider why our society supports museums and why we expect that a museum will conserve materials which are deemed of cultural value and exhibit these for the education of the public. A significant part of each student's experience in the course will consist of a working internship in a nearby museum. Fall, S. Miller.

105. Field Methods in Anthropology. An investigation of various methods used in the study of culture, e.g., participant observation, key informant interviewing, linguistic analysis. Students will learn techniques of both collecting and analyzing
sociocultural data and will carry out a range of research projects during the course of the semester. Prerequisites: Anthropology 2. Fall, L. Martins.

108. Kinship, Family, Sexuality. How do cultures organize human reproduction and integrate it into social life? Because of the universality of biological reproduction, anthropology has used kinship to compare greatly diverse cultures and societies. Tracing the history of anthropology's concern with kinship, the course examines marriage patterns, descent, and family structure in Western and non-Western societies. It also considers emerging forms of kinship involving new reproductive technologies and lesbian and gay kinship ties in a global perspective. L. Deeb (Scripps); D. Segal.

110. Nature and Society in Amazonia. The course investigates the relations between humans and the environment, focusing on the inter-play of social and natural Amazonian worlds in material, political, cultural and economic terms.
The course has ethnographic and historical components: we will study different Amazonian groups and the ways their lives connect to the forest and its beings; we will consider the history of the human presence and the colonization of the Amazon
to tease out the different roles that the region has played in the political-economy and the imaginary of Western societies. Spring, L. Martins.

111. Historical Archaeology. This course examines the goals and methods of historical archaeology, as well as the archaeology of specific sites. Its focus is North America and the interactions of European immigrants with Native Americans and peoples of African and Asian ancestry. Archaeological data are used to challenge accepted interpretations (based on written documents) of such sites as Monticello and the Little Bighorn Battlefield. We will look at early Jamestown's relationship with the Powhatan Indians, the lives of Thomas Jefferson's slaves and other examples as seen through the archaeological evidence. S. Miller. [not offered 2011–12]

MS 111. Anthropology of Photography. (See Media Studies 111). Spring, R. Talmor.

MS 112. Anthropology of Media. (See Media Studies 112). Fall, R. Talmor.

Mus 112. Intro to Ethnomusicology. For description, see Music 112. C. Jaquez (Scripps).

113. Ethnographic Tales of the City: Anthropological Approaches to Urban Life. Students in this course will examine the ways ethnographic fieldwork methods have been applied to research in urban settings, explore global patterns of urbanization and urban sociality, and consider the distinct theoretical and epistemological issues that arise from the cultural analysis of urban life. Seminar participants will critically engage a range of recent and classic urban ethnographies from around the world and conduct their own investigations. Staff (Scripps).

117. Language and Power. What is power and how is it reflected in and created through talk and writing? For example, who takes control of a conversation? Do women do more conversational work than men? How do immigrants feel about
non-native speakers using their language? How are ideological differences reflected in the way "facts" are reported? When is language discriminatory? We will examine the theories of Bourdieu, Bakhtin and Foucault through our own analyses of power dynamics in language use. Spring, C. Strauss.

120. Studying Up: The Anthropology of Elites and Other Dominant Social Groups. This course surveys ethnographic studies of elites and other dominant class groups, bureaucracies, institutions, governmental and non-governmental
organizations, etc. Through lectures, discussion of readings, and individual ethnographic research projects, students will explore the particular ethical, methodological, theoretic, political, critical, and moral dimensions of such work.
Prerequisite: Anth 2 or permission of instructor. Staff (Scripps).

124. Illness and Health: Anthropological Perspectives. This course provides an introduction to the study of medical anthropology, with emphasis on the human rather than the biological side of things. It examines medicine from a crosscultural perspective, focusing on the relationship between culture, health and illness in various contexts. Students will learn how to analyze medical practice as cultural systems. The course also looks at how Western medicine (bio-medicine) conceptualize disease, health, body and mind and how they intersect with national and international organizations and processes. L. Martins. [not offered 2011–12]

125. U.S. Social and Immigration Discourses. How do Americans arrive at their beliefs about public policy? We will analyze interviews with diverse Americans (African American, European, American and Mexican American men and women
from different backgrounds) about such issues as national health insurance, welfare and immigration. What ideologies have affected the way Americans talk about these issues? How are people's views on these issues related to their personal identities? We'll read the work of other scholars on Americans' social policies views, but our focus in this seminar will be learning how to analyze what people say to uncover implicit and possibly conflicting cultural assumptions, ideologies and identities. Seminar, limited enrollment. C. Strauss. [not offered 2011–12]

Clas 125. Ancient Spectacle: Glory, Games and Gore in Ancient Greece and Rome. (See Classics 125). M. Berenfeld.

126. Gangs. What are gangs? Who joins them and why? Why are they so violent? While answers to these questions are often laden with political rhetoric, this class takes an ethnographic and community-based approach to the study of gangs,
positioning gang culture within the complex social forces that necessitate alternative strategies for survival in urban arenas. S. Phillips. [not offered 2011–12]

129. Gender, Nationalisms and the State. This seminar examines the centrality of gender to identities produced in the modern world through participation in (or exclusion from) state, nation and nationalist and/or anti-colonial movements. Critical analyses of concepts such as "gender," citizenship," "imperialism," "nationalism," "power," and "militarism" will be integrated with specific case studies. L. Deeb (Scripps).

Anth133/Arhi133. Indians in Action.Understanding of the indigenous cultures in the Americas have been shaped profoundly by cinematic images. Representations of and by Native Americans have much to say not only about the people they depicture but also about the complex relationships between them and national societies. This class studies a selection of iconic films: including ethnographies, mainstream narrative films, as well as the work of indigenous film and videomakers. Our focus will be on understanding the constructed nature of these cultural artifacts as they become important elements in the production of history and historical agents. This course considers that what is put into images is as important as what is left out. Spring, B. Anthes/L. Martins. [not offered 2011–12]

134. Colonial Societies. This seminar explores colonial societies through a small number of case studies. Themes will include the mutual shaping of colonizers and colonized peoples, the historical construction of identities of race, nationality and gender and the importance of colonialism in the history of the modern world. Students will participate in research on archival materials. Prerequisite: History/Anthropology 11. D. Segal. [not offered 2011–12]

Anth135/Envs 135. Plants and People. Plants play an important role in nearly all areas of human activities and are the basis of human culture. Topics to be covered include plants used for food, medicine, clothing, shelter and poisons, past and present uses of indigenous and introduced plants by Native Americans, current uses of plants growing in California and sustainable plant communities. Course activities include field trips, field identification and preparation and consumption of certain plants. S. Miller/M. Herrold-Menzies. [not offered 2011–12]

137. Food and Culture. Food is at the heart of most cultures and this course examines the social practices and meanings that surround food and food rituals. Feasts, fasts, and diets will be viewed in historical and social context with close
attention to issues of gender and class. Consumption and industrial foodways in the global context will be linked to local tastes and food practices. Staff (Scripps).

EA 140. The Desert As a Place. (See Environmental Studies 140) P. Faulstich.

EA 141. Progress & Oppression. (See Environmental Analaysis 148). P. Faulstich.

EA 148. Ethnoecology. (See Environmental Studies 148). P. Faulstich.

149. Miracles, Visions, and Dreams: The Anthropology of the (Extra)Ordinary. What makes a phenomenon "extraordinary?" And how do anthropologists study such phenomena? This course explores these questions by looking at the roles of miracles, dreams, and visions in human life. Among the course's tasks is to consider how such phenomena are studied, theorized, and written about. Spring, A. Shenoda (Scripps).

Clas 150. Archaeology of the Age of Augustus. (See Classics 150). M. Berenfeld.

153. History of Anthropological Theory. This course will provide a survey of the history of anthropological theory and method through a combination of theoretical writings and ethnographic monographs. It will examine how different historical moments and theories of knowledge have informed anthropological objectives and projects. Close attention will be paid to the changing content, form and sites addressed throughout the history of the discipline. Prerequisite: Anth 11/ Hist 11. Spring, D. Segal.

Anth 160. Native American Women's Arts. This course explores arts created by native American women emphasizing their traditional forms of ceramics, basketry, textiles and beadwork. Other media such as painting, sculpture and jewelry are included. A primary focus is on the lives and work of individual artists, expressed in their changing cultural contexts. S. Miller. [not offered 2011–12]

Clas 161. Greek Art and Archaeology. (See Classics 161). Fall, M. Berenfeld.

Clas 162. Roman Art and Archaeology. (See Classics 162). M. Berenfeld.

Clas 164. Pompeii and the Cities of Vesuvius. (See Classics 164). M. Berenfeld.

168. Prehistoric Humans and Their Environments.The prehistoric development of human cultures occurred in a variety of environmental contexts. How did these environments shape the cultures? How did human cultures utilize and even try to control their environments? In this course we will consider examples from around the world, investigating the interaction of culture and environment in the prehistoric period. S. Miller. [not offered 2011–12]

170. Seminar in Human Evolution. The course will investigate recent discoveries and theories concerning our evolution. We will emphasize the interrelationships of environment and behavior, anatomical structure and function, technological advance and social change. We will focus particularly on the earliest African evidence, drawing on comparative materials from Europe and Asia. Prerequisite: Anthropology 1, or equivalent. Enrollment is limited. Spring, S. Miller.

171. Seminar in Sexuality and Religion. This advanced seminar examines a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches to questions of the relationship between religion and sexuality cross-culturally. Questions addressed may include the production and nature of categories, discipline, bodies, submission, marriage and juridical regulation, moralities, kinship, politics, and the state. Prerequisites: Anthro 2 or ID 26. L. Deeb (Scripps).

178. Prisons: Theory, Ethnography and Action.This seminar critically analyzes past and present issues in juvenile detention, mass incarceration and the prisonindustrial complex in the United States. Although the class is primarily focused on juvenile detention, we familiarize ourselves with readings about the current state of our penal system as a whole. This semester, the class will create and pilot a curriculum designed as a rapid-fire, three-week literacy intervention. The class will consist of readings and discussion, as well as planning curriculum development and implementation. S. Phillips. [not offered 2011–12]

185. Topics in Anthropology of the Middle East/North Africa. Intensive and focused study of specific issues and themes in the Middle East and North Africa, drawing extensively on anthropological sources and modes of inquiry. Repeatable for credit with different topics. L. Deeb (Scripps)

185U. Topics in Anthropology of the Middle East/North Africa: The Uprisings of Winter 2011. Intensive and focused study of specific issues and themes in the Middle East and North Africa, drawing extensively on anthropological sources and modes of inquiry. Repeatable for credit with different topics. In Spring 2012, the topical focus will be the uprisings of winter 2011, including Tunisia, Egypt, Bahrain and Libya, among others. L. Deeb (Scripps)

190. Senior Seminar in Anthropology and Ethnographic Writing. This course has both practical and intellectual ends. Practically it aims to help students who plan to write theses on topics involving cultural representations to (a) formulate research questions; (b) situate their work in and against a relevant body of existing writing, and (c) structure their own descriptions and arguments. Intellectually, it aims to introduce students to some of the ways anthropologists have thought about the processes and politics of writing about culture(s) and people(s). L. Deeb (Scripps)

191. Senior Thesis Seminar. Spring, L. Deeb (Scripps).

MCSI 195. Advanced Seminar in Social Inquiry. Topic for Spring 2012: Democracies. (See Munroe Center for Social Inquiry 195). Spring, D. Segal.